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Publication numberUS2854186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1958
Filing dateMar 15, 1954
Priority dateMar 15, 1954
Publication numberUS 2854186 A, US 2854186A, US-A-2854186, US2854186 A, US2854186A
InventorsRussell J Williams
Original AssigneeBemis Bro Bag Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag
US 2854186 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept; 30, 1958 R. J. WILLIAMS 2, 54, 6

BAG

4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 15, 1954 Sept. 30, 1958 R. J. WILLIAMS 2,854,186

BAG

4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 15, 1954 Sept. 30, 1958 R. J. WILLIAMS 1 2,854,186

BAG

Filed March 15, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United States Patent 6 BAG Russell J. Williams, iayton, Mo., assignor to Bemis Bro. Bag Coxnpany, St. Louis, Mo, a corporation of Mis sonri Application March 15, 1954, Serial No. 416,281

7 Claims. (Q1. 229-55) This invention relates to bags, and more particularly to rnnlti-ply paper bags having laterally offset ply seams.

Multi-ply paper bags of the class described are conventionally formed with either stitched or folded and pasted closures. Bags with stitched bottom closures are usually provided with a stitched top closure. Bags with folded and pasted bottom closures (for example, selfopening squared bottoms or satchel bottoms) may be provided either with a stitched top .closure or a folded and pasted top closure. In the case of a stitched closure, the line of holes punched in the bag by the needle which drives the stitches through the bag weakens the bag at the closure. Under strain such as may occur when the filled bag is dropped, the stitches may cut through the paper. In the case of a pasted closure, the bag is weakened by the creasing and folding incident to the closure, particularly at crease intersections. To offset the weakening effect of the closures bags of the class described have usually been made with enough plies to resist cutting the paper in the case of stitched closures and to resist tearing at the creases in the case of pasted closures. This means that one or more plies is useful only as regards its end portions at the closures, and that its intermediate portion between closures has no useful effect, representing a waste of paper.

'Among the several objects of this invention may be noted the provision of a mode of reinforcing multi-ply bags of the class described at their end closures to offset the weakness otherwise caused by the stitching in the case of stitched closures or by the creases in the case of pasted closures, which eliminates any necessity for the use of one or more complete extra plies to offset the weakening effect of the closures, thereby effecting great saving of paper in quantity production; and the provision of bags with the stated reinforcement adapted for economical manufacture. ()ther objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the constructions hereinafter described, the scope of the invention being indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which several of various possible embodiments of the invention are illustrated,

Fig. 1 is a semi-diagrammatic view in perspective illustrating procedure in the manufacture of gusseted stitched bottom bags in accordance with this invention;

Fig. 1A is an enlarged continuation of Fig. l illustrating further steps in the procedure;

Fig. 2 is a View in perspective of a gusseted stitchedbottom bag of this invention as it appears from one side thereof, part of the outer ply of the bag being broken away;

Fig. 3 is a view in perspective showing the other side of the Fig. 2 bag, part of the outer ply of the bag being broken away;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged line cross-section taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 3 showing a modification;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged line cross-section taken on line 66 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a View in perspective of a length of multi-ply gusseted tubing adapted to be provided with a pasted selfopening square bottom and a pasted top closure, parts of the outer ply of the tubing being broken away;

Fig. 8 is a horizontal cross-section taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a vertical cross-section taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 10 is a view in perspective, on a reduced scale, of a self-opening square bottom bag formed from the length of tubing shown in Fig. 7, the bag being shown as open, and part of the outer ply of the bag being broken away;

Fig. 11 is a view in perspective of a length of multi-ply gusseted tubing adapted to be provided with a pasted selfopening square bottom and a stitched top closure, parts of the outer ply of the bag being broken away; and,

Fig. 12 is a view in perspective, on a reduced scale, of a bag formed from the length of tubing shown in Fig. 11 having a self-opening square bottom and a stitched top closure, part of the outer ply of the bag being broken away.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring to the drawings, Figs. 1-4 illustrate the manufacture of gusseted multi-ply stitched-bottom paper bags in accordance with this invention. To avoid complication of the disclosure, the manufacture of twoply bags is shown, but it will be understood that the principles of the invention are applicable to the manufacture of bags with more than two plies. In accordance with this invention as it pertains to the manufacture of two-ply bags, two Webs of paper 1 and 3 are continuously drawn from supply rolls 5 and 7, combined to form a twoply Web at a combining guide Q, and the two-ply web is continuously fed through a conventional tuber (not illustrated) to be formed into tubing. Guide 9 is shown as a roll. The webs 1 and 3 travel to the roll 9 in spaced paths, converging together at the roll to form a two-ply web. The web 1, which eventually becomes the inner ply of the tubing, is shown as travelling from supply roll 5 over an upper guide roll 11 from which it leads downward to the combining roll 9. The web 3, which eventually becomes the outer ply of the tubing, is shown as travelling from supply roll 7 around a lower guide roil 13, from which it travels upward to a guide roll 15, thence forward to a guide roll 17, and thence forward and downward to the combining roll 9. The bite of webs l and 3 (i. e., the transverse line on which they come into engagement) is indicated at B. The webs 1 and 3 are combined in laterally offset relation, as is conventional in the manufacture of multi-ply paper bags.

As the webs l and 3 are combined at the combining roll 9, reinforcing patches or hands 21 are fed in between the webs and pasted in between them, the patches or bands being spaced at bag length intervals along the length of the composite two-ply web formed at the combining roll. The patches or bands 21 are severed from a continuous Web 23 of material drawn from a supply roll 25. This material may be paper, cloth or any other suitable reinforcing material. As shown in Fig. l, the width of web 23 is preferably somewhat less than the Width of webs 1 and 3. The web 23 is drawn from the supply roll 25 at a speed less than the speed of webs 1 and 3 by a pair of draw rolls 27. It is fed by the draw rolls in a preferably downwardly inclined path through a cutter 29 and between the converging webs 1 and 3 into the bite B of the webs. The cutter 29, as shown,

Patented Sept. 30, 1958 may comprise an anvil roll 31 and a double-blade cutter 33, and is adapted to sever the web 23 into patches which are of an appropriate dimension in the longitudinal direction: ofthe webs 1 and 3. Whatthe appropriate 1011- gitudinal dimension is will, be. later madev clear; in reference to the finished bags. The line on which the cutter cuts,- web; 23.. is preferably spaced from, the bite B of webs 1. and. 3 a distance corresponding generally to the desired lomitudinal dimension for the patch, The tun-- ing of the cutter is such that it severe the web 23' to form; a patch substantially at the instant that the end of the web 23 is caught in the bite of webs 1 and 3, and theses/cred patchis thereupon drawn in between the webs 1 and 3 at the speed at which webs 1 and 3 are, travelling. The. patch; is pulled; away from the freshly cut end. of web 23 since web" 23.. is fed by the. draw roll-s. 27 at aspeed lower than the speed of the webs. 1 and 3, the patches drawn in; between the webs 1 and: 3 are spaced: along the length of the webs 1 and 3 at equal intervals. The speed of web 23 in relation to, the. speed of webs 1 and 3 is made such that the spacing of the patches corresponds to the desired length of the bags to bemanufactured.

The patches or bands 21 are shown as being adhered between the webs 1 and 3 by applying a pattern of adhesive (paste) to the inside surface of the web 3 as it travels toward the combining roll 9. As illustrated, this is accomplished by means of aspot paster adapted. to apply a pair of rows of spots 37b and 37t across the width of the web 3, the two rows of the pair being,

spaced longitudinally of the web a distance somewhat and; with sucessively applied pairs spaced at bag length intervals along the length of the web. The timing of the paster is such that each pair of rows of paste spots 37b and 372 registers with a patch 21 as the patch is drawn in between the webs 1 and 3, with the two rows 37b and 3'lt lying on opposite sides of the transverse center line C--C of the patch and closely adjacent those edges of thepatch which extend transversely of the webs.

Thus, there issues from the combining roll 9 the composite web 39 consisting of the webs or plies 1 and 3 with the patches or bands 21 pasted in between the plies atbag length intervals along the length of the composite web. In accordance with the invention as illustrated in Fig. 1, the. bands extend from near one side margin of the. composite web 39 to near the other. The composite web travels around a guide roll 41 and thence to a tuber (not illustrated) where it is formed in, conventional manner into gusseted tubing 43 in whichv the two edges of each ply are overlapped and secured. directly together throughout their length by adhesive to form an individual tube having a longitudinal seam. The seams of the resultant inner and outer tubes are designated 45 and 47. These are laterally offset from one another,

shown in Fig. 1A. The bands extends substantially completely girthwise of the tubing from near one side of the seamed region of the tubing to near the other side thereof. Here it will be understood that the width of the band-forming web 23and hence the transverse dimension of the bands is preferably somewhat less than the: width of the ply-forming webs 1 and 3 so that the. bands do. not extend into the, ply seams, otherwise the tubing (and bags to be formed therefrom) would be unduly thickened. at the seam.

The tubing 43 is severed into individual bag lengths 51 substantially on the transverse center lines O C ofthe patches. or bands 21 (see Fig. 1A). This divides each. individual patch or bands. 21 intov two patches or bands 21b and 2lt, and results in each bag length 51 having a patch or band, 2112 at one end, and a, patch band 21! at the other. The band 21b of each bag length is pasted in between the two plies 1 and 3 of the bag length by the row of spots 37b, and the band 21t is pasted in between the plies by the row of spots 37t. Rows 37b and 37t, having originally been located adjacent thetransverse edges of bands 21, are spaced from the respective ends of the bag length. Each bag length is bottomed bystitching together its front and back walls adjacent, one; end ofthe baglength (the end including band 21b) as indicated at 53 in Figs. 2 and 3. The stitches extend wise of the bag (longitudinally of plies 1 and 3) need.

be. only suflicient to account for the spacing of the stitchingabove the bottom of the bag (standard spacingbeing one-half inch) plus enough space for the paste spots, and.

.it will be clear that the appropriate longitudinal dimension for each band 21 is twice this. Each bag length. is also ultimately closed at its top by a line of, stitching like stitching- 53, with the .top stitches extending through 4 the band 21: above the row of paste spots 37t;. It; will .be understood that the top closure may be formedeither after filling, or after the formation of a valve; and, before filling;

Inthe filled bag provided with thestitched bottom and. top closures, the patches or hands 21b and Mt act, as, re.

inforcement to prevent the stitches from cutting through the bag plies under strain such as is incurred when the bag is dropped. 7 This. reinforcement results from the bands being. pasted in between the bag plies, wherebythey are locked or anchored against moving outward from tween the plies. Each band provides two extra; thick:

nesses of paper for reinforcement, except in, the region of the ply seams, but here there are two extra thick-- nesses irrespective of thebands in view of the overlapping of the margins of the plies. Hence, the absence of band material in the region of the ply seams is not detrimental to the strength of the bag. The bands also provide rein: forcement at the corners of the fitted bag.

It will be understood that in some cases it maybe dosirable to have the bands pasted to both plies more S- curely to anchor them in between the plies. be particularly desirable where the band material is, of considerably higher strength than the bag ply material and additional pasting is needed to utilize the full, strength of, the band material. Under th se circumstances, paste may be applied to web 1, as well as to Web 3, by a pastel? similar to the paster 35.

The bags may be manufactured, with more. than two plies simply by combining additional webs with webs; 1.

and 3 at the combining roll, 9, as will be readily under- I stood. It is also contemplated that bags, which have. more than two plies may have more than one band at: each end. For example, a three-ply bag may have two bands at each end, one pasted in between the inner, ply and intermediate ply, and, the other pasted in between the intermediate ply and the outer ply. i

It will be observed that the stitched closure for. a gusseted bag is inherently reinforced where" it traverses-me:

or bands, which are designated 61b and 61t to distinr This may guish them from bands 21b and 21t. Each of bands 61b and 612 is pasted in between the plies of the front wall (the unseamed wall) of the bag, the bottom edge of the bottom band 6112 being coincident with the bottom edges of the plies, the top edge of the top band 61t being coincident with the top edges of the plies. The transverse dimensions of the bands and their position are such that their side edges are approximately coincident with the inner creases 63 of the gussets. Thus, the bands reinforce the stitching in the two-ply region of the front wall of the bag between the gussets. Outward of the side edges of the bands, the gussets provide reinforcement. In the back wall of the bag, the longitudinal ply seams provide reinforcement. It will be understood that bags of the type shown in Figs. and 6 may be manufactured in the same manner as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 1A, using a relatively narrow patch-forming web.

Figs. 7-9 illustrate a length of gusseted two-ply paper tubing 71 provided toward its ends with patches or hands pasted in between its plies and specially adapted to be provided with a pasted self-opening square bottom and a pasted top closure. The inner ply of the tubing is designated 73, and the outer ply 75. The seam for the inner ply is indicated at 77 and the seam for the outer ply at 79. The bottom band is designated 81b and the top band 81t. Each of these bands extends substantially completely girthwise of the tubing from near one side of the seamed region of the tubing to near the other side thereof. The lower edge of the bottom band is spaced from the bottom edges of the plies and the upper edge of the top band is spaced from the top edges of the plies to avoid undue stiffening of the end regions of the tubing. The heightwise dimension of the bottom band 81b is such that it extends somewhat above the uppermost crease 83 which is made in forming the bottom according to conventional and well-known bag bottoming procedure. The heightwise dimension of the top band is shown as corresponding to that of the bottom band. The bottom band is pasted in between the plies by a row of spots of paste 85b which is located above the uppermost crease 83 adjacent the upper edge of the band. The extension of the band above this crease need be only sufiicient for the pasting. The top band is similarly pasted in between the plies by a row of spots of paste 85t adjacent the lower edge of the band. Conventional bottoming slits are indicated at 87.

Fig. 10 illustrates the self-opening square bottom bag formed from the length of tubing shown in Fig. 7. The bottom comprises side flaps 89 folded in one lines 91, a flap 93 folded in from the front wall of the bag on line 95, and a flap 97 folded in from the back Wall of the bag on line 99 overlying and pasted to flap 93. It will be understood that in the conventional manufacture of bags with self-opening square bottoms, they are creased on the line 83 where the front wall is folded back in forming the bottom. All the bottom creases, including the creases 83, are reinforced by the band 81b. Band 81! similarly reinforces the creases made in forming a pasted top closure for the bag.

Fig. 11 illustrates a length of gusseted two-ply paper tubing 101 the lower part of which is like the lower part of the length of tubing 71 of Fig. 7, including a band 81b for reinforcing a self-opening square bottom, and the upper part of which is like the upper part of the bag shown in Figs. 2 and 3, including a band 21t for reinforcing a stitched top closure. Fig. 12 shows the bag made from the length of tubing shown in Fig. 11 with a self-opening square bottom identical to that shown in Fig. 10, and a line of stitching 103 at its top with the stitches extending through the band 21t in the unpasted area above the row of paste spots 372. which secure band 21t between the plies.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A multi-ply paper bag formed from a length of multi-ply paper tubing and having a front wall and a back wall, the plies of the tubing having the edges thereof which extend lengthwise of the tubing laterally offset, the two edges of each ply being overlapped and secured together by adhesive to form an individual tube having a longitudinal scam, the seams of said individual tubes being laterally offset by reason of the lateral offset of the edges of the plies, and all of the seams being located in the back wall of the length of tubing, said tubing having at least at one end thereof a band of reinforcing material extending girthwise of the tubing between two of said individual tubes across the front wall and around into the back wall, the length of said band being less than the girth of said tubing and said band being so positioned in relation to the girth of said tubing as to terminate short of the seam of at least one of said two tubes, and the two edges of each ply included in the seam of the respective tube being adhered directly together throughout the entire length of the seam, means anchoring the hand between said two tubes, and means securing together portions of said front and back walls of the tubing at said end of the tubing to provide a closure, said band having a portion thereof located within and reinforcing said closure.

2. A multi-ply paper bag formed from a length of multi-ply paper tubing and having a front wall and a back wall, the plies of the tubing having the edges thereof which extend lengthwise of the tubing laterally offset, the two edges of each ply being overlapped and secured together by adhesive to form an individual tube having a longitudinal seam, the seams of said individual tubes being laterally offset by reason of the lateral offset of the edges of the plies, and all of the seams being located in a region of the back wall of the length of tubing, two bands of reinforcing material, one at each end of the length of tubing, extending girthwise of the tubing between two of said individual tubes thereof across the front wall and around into the back wall, the length of each of said bands being less than the girth of said tubmg and said bands being so positioned in relation to the girth of said tubing as to extend from near one side to near the other side of the said seamed region of the back wall of the length of tubing and terminate short of said seamed region, and the two edges of each ply included in the seam of the respective tube being adhered directly together throughout the entire length of the seam, means anchoring the bands between said plies, and a line of stitching closing at least one end of the bag and extending through the band at said end of the bag, said hand through its anchorage between the plies acting as reinforcement to prevent the stitching from cutting through the bag plies.

3. A multi-ply paper bag as set forth in claim 2 wherein the anchoring means comprises adhesive applied on a line offset from the line of stitching.

4. A multi-ply paper bag as set forth in claim 3 wherein the adhesive is applied on a line spaced inward from the line of stitching.

5. A multi-ply paper bag formed from a length of multi-ply paper tubing and having a front wall and a back wall, the plies of the tubing having the edges thereof which extend lengthwise of the tubing laterally offset, the two edges of each ply being overlapped and secured together by adhesive to form an individual tube having a longitudinal scam, the seams of said individual tubes being laterally offset by reason of the lateral oifset of the edges of the plies, and all of the seams being located 7 ina region of. the backwall of, thelength, of tubing-,. two bands, of reinfiorcing material, one at each end of, the length of tubing, extending girthwise of the; tubing be,- tween two of said individual tubes thereof across. th v front wall and around into the back wall, the lengthoi each of said bands being less than the girth of said tubing and said bands being so-positioned in relation to the girth of said tubing as to extend from near one side, to near the other side of the said seamed region of the back wall of the length of tubingfand' terminate short of said seamed region, and, the two edges of each ply included, in the seam ofthe respective tube being adhered directly together throughout'the entire length of the in the bands are spaced from the ends of the length of tubing. 7 I

7. A multi-ply paper bag as set forth in claim 5wherein the bands are anchored between the plies by adhesive only in region located inward from the, ends of the 3 length, of tubing 21 distaneegreater thauthe spacing of the. innermost 0:15, said, folds from the respective. end. of the length of. ubing... V 4

Refierences (Cited in the. fileof this patent UNITED STATES 962,934 1,910,449. Rose May 23, 1933. 1,914,113 Eaton lune 13, 1933 1,922,867 R0sm it Aug., 1-5, 1933. 2,092,602 Finn. et a1 Sept. 7,1937 2,116,571, Gurwick May 10, 193.8] 2,220,874 Waters Nov. 5., 1940, 2,260,064 Stokes Oct. 21, 1941 2,311,733 Bushman Feb/2 3, 1943 2,330,015 Stokes ,.Sep.t. 21,, 1943 2,330,255 Ames Sept. 28, 1943 2,442,431 Peters et al. 1 June 1, 19,48, 2,493,349 Hoppe Ian. 3, 1950v 2,625,318 R'oss Jan. 13, 1953, 2,745,593 Brady May 15, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 512,903 Belgium Aug. 14', 1952 Weathenwax June 2-8,, 1910 EARL UNITEDWSTATES rlTENT UFFICE H CE'HFICATE OF CQRRECTIUN Patent Non 2,854,186 September 30, 195

Russell J. Williams It is Iuerebj certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected belowo Column '7, line 22, for the claim reference numeral "5" read 6 g line 24, for "region" read regions Signed and sealed this 30th day of December 1958.

( Attest:

" ROBERT c. WATsoN Cossioner of Patents Attesting' Oflicer

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2969907 *Apr 15, 1958Jan 31, 1961Dixie Wax Paper CompanyReinforced bag
US2989218 *Feb 5, 1958Jun 20, 1961Continental Can CoReinforced drum body
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US3081674 *Jun 22, 1961Mar 19, 1963Interstate Bag Company IncMethods of making shopping bags having reinforced top and bottom
US3105417 *Nov 18, 1960Oct 1, 1963Hammer SteffenMethod for production of reinforced bags, tobacco pouches, etc. of synthetic foil
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US3680445 *Jun 5, 1970Aug 1, 1972Apl CorpMethod and apparatus for manufacturing shopping bag
US4014252 *Sep 2, 1975Mar 29, 1977Show Seitai Kogyo Kaisha Ltd.Method of manufacturing bags
US5871790 *Mar 4, 1997Feb 16, 1999Union Camp CorporationLaminated bag wall construction
US8579507 *Aug 27, 2010Nov 12, 2013Graphic Flexible Packaging, LlcReinforced bag
US20110052106 *Aug 27, 2010Mar 3, 2011Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Reinforced Bag
WO1989007561A1 *Feb 17, 1989Aug 24, 1989Fluid Bag Ab OyA flexible receptacle
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/109, 493/210, 383/126
International ClassificationB31B19/62, B65D33/02
Cooperative ClassificationB31B2219/6007, B65D33/02, B31B19/62
European ClassificationB65D33/02, B31B19/62