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Publication numberUS2855927 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1958
Filing dateMay 5, 1955
Priority dateMay 5, 1955
Publication numberUS 2855927 A, US 2855927A, US-A-2855927, US2855927 A, US2855927A
InventorsEdward Henderson
Original AssigneeEdward Henderson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic needle mount
US 2855927 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 14, 1958 E. HENDERSON 2,855,927

HYPODERMIC NEEDLE MOUNT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 5, 1955 INVENOR Edward 17e/darum ATTORNEY Oct..l4, 1958 E. HENDERSON HYPODERMIC NEEDLE MOUNT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 5, 1955 ATTORNEYS HYPODERMC NEEDLE MOUNT Edward Henderson, Montclair, N. J.

Application May 5, 1955, Serial No. 506,208

9 Claims. (Cl. 12S-218) This invention relates to a hypodermic needle mount for releasably and resiliently 'holding a hypodermic needle securely in place for use.

Known types of hypodermic needle m-ounts include those which are adapted for rigidly holding needles of uniform diameter from end to end and others which accommodate only needles of special construction, as with flared ends, intermediate flanges or other peripherally projecting parts. In the rst mentioned group, are mounts provided with clutch devices of metal or other rigid material. These have disadvantages which greatly limit their use. For example, a rigid clutch can eifectively retain only needles of a given diameter under conditions which avoid leakage; or, 1as an alternative, must be employed with adequate gaskets. A further disadvantage of the rigid or unyielding clutch mount is that a needle so held is easily broken by lateral impact.

Known clutch type mounts also have the disadvantage that toc much time and care are required in replacing needles, particularly under conditions which make the time factor critical. Thus, where there is no inner end stop to quickly and automatically limit inward movement of the needle, valuable time can be wasted in trying to place it accurately in the clutch. Also, without such a stop, undue handling of the needle is involved with consequent increased likelihood of its contamination before use.

Where the mount receives only needles specially formed to limit their inward movement, its use is, to that extent, restricted because such needles are not in abundant supply and are more expensive than conventional types of needles which are commonly of uniform diameter.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved needle mount assembly which retains the needle securely but resiliently in place when in use and provides a positive stop to limit inward displacement of the needle even when considerable force is -applied thereto, but which nevertheless may be readily opened and closed, when desired, to permit the convenient and rapid insertion, adjustment and removal of the needle.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved hypodermic needle mount of the above character which maybe readily cleaned and sterilized.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an improved needle mount having means for retaining an inexpensive needle of substantially uniform diameter from end to end so that the needle can be discarded if desired after use. Such needles may advantageously be packed in improved sterile vpackages which permit shipping, storage, handling and insertion in the mount for use without contamination.

It is also an object of the invention to provide an improved shock absorbing mount for a hypodermic needle which embraces a shank portion thereof in a cushioning element for absorbing and minimizing shocks or impacts to the needle applied in a transverse or lateral direction.

My invention contemplates the provision of an improved hypodernric needle mount or holder having a Patented oct. i4, s

stressed or released condition, a needle of uniform diamy eter from end to end may ibe readily inserted in or removed frorn said opening. An adjustable member is provided for stressing the collet so that the material thereof ows into gripping engagement with a shank portion of the needle to securely hold it in place. The collet thus serving as the sole retainer for the needle, not only securely holds it against accidental endwise displacement but also serves as a shock absorber minimizing impacts andv shocks imparted to the needle in a lateral or transverse direction.

A positive stop is preferably provided to engage the needle and limit the imward displacement thereof.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed. description of the drawings in which- Fig. l is a central longitudinal sectional View of my improved hypodermic needle mount showing a needle with a portion of its shank positioned loosely in the collet thereof which is in normal, unstressed condition;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. l showing the mount in closed position with the collet stressed so as to grip and securely retain the needle in position for use;

Fig. 3 is a central longitudinal sectional View similar to Fig. l showing a modified form of mount in which resilient prongs embrace the collet and a slightly different form of needle stop is employed;

Fig. 4 is a similar view showing the collet of Fig. 3 in closed position gripping the needle;

Fig. 5 is a central longitudinal sectional view of a further modiiied form of the collet in a mount adapted to iit the outer end or tip of a hypodermic syringe having a detachable tip;

Fig. 6 is a central longitudinal view of a further moditied form of mount similar to that shown in Fig. 5 and in which a portion of the passageway through the tip is otset to form a shoulder that serves as a positive stop;

Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional View in the direction of the arrows on the line 7 7 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a central longitudinal sectional view of a further modified form of collet and tip applied to a syringe and showing that the other end or tip of the syringe may, in certain instances, serve as a positive stop for the needle; and

Figs. 9 and 10 are central longitudinal sectional views of a further modified form of needle mount embodying my invention shown in open and closed positions, respectively, and illustrating a needle mounted therein with a laterally offset shank portion -engaging the tip which serves in such case as a positive stop.

Referring now to Figs. l and 2, the invention is there illustrated as embodied in a mount applied to the barrel l5 of a hypodermic syringe. The barrel may be made in the usual manner of glass, plastic material or the like with a tubular neck 16 at the outer end thereof to which the base iiange i7 at one end of the tubular tip i3 is suitably secured, as by being cemented thereto.

The tip i8 may be made of any suitable material, as metal, with its outer end threaded at i9. Its central bore 20 is larger in diameter than any of the needles to be used with the mount and extends through the tip With its lower or inner end communicating with the interior of the syringe barrel, as shown, through a similar bore in said neck 16 and with its outer end positioned to receive an inner end shank portion of a needle.

The outer end of tip 18 is countersunk or recessed as shown ,at 21 around bore 20 to provide a seat for one end of a collet 22 in the form of a tubular sleeve or bushing made of a flexible resilient material having th'clifeteistiesof rubber, such as natural rubber, synthetic rubber, or a naturalor synthetic silicone rubber and having a longitudinal bore- 14. Both ends of said colletm'ay be tapered, as sh'owi'i, sothat either will conform with the correspondingly tapered contour of said counterbore21. Thus," th`e"collet`may be mounted in the end of tip 18 with either end lengaging said counterbore,j 21.`

The' bore 14 through' collet 22 is'larger in diameter than the outside diameter ofthe largest size 'h'y'podermic needle appropriate for use with the mount so that when said collet is in normal' unstressedA condition, as shown in Fig. 1, the needle may oe readily inserted in and'removed therefrom. Although rubber of' the 'consistency useful for this purpose is substantially non-compressible, it will Lflow or 'shift its' position 'under compression. Accordingly, when stressis applied tothe collet with a needle positioned therein, the material thereof will flow into gripping engagem'entwith' the needle in the manner shown in Fig. Zand so securely retain the needleiin place for use.

To accomplish this result, I provide suitable collet stressing means one form of which includes a compression cap 23 internally tapered froma wide bottoinopening to a" narrower top opening 24 and which is provided with threads'on a portion of the inner surfaceengaging with the threads 19 on tip '18. In this manner, cap. 23 is adjustably mounted onV tip ISso that it can readily be-manipulated from open or needlel receiving and releasing position, as shown in Fig. l with the collet unstressed, to closed position with the cap 23 stressing collet 22 so as to cause it to tightly grip a shank portion of the needle 26. y

The outer end opening 24 of compression cap 23is substantially larger in diameterV than any of the needles to be used with the assembly; Inasm'uch'as the passage 20 `in tip 18 and the opening 24 in cap 23 are larger than the needle, the latter is engaged and securely retained in the mount when cap 23 is tightened, solely by means of said collet 22. In addition, it willbe seen that the collet of rubber or equivalentsubstance provides a resilient cushion which permits rocking of the needle out of its axial position and thusfunetions as a shock absorber for absorbing and minimizing laterally directed impacts and serves as a Watertightseal to prevent passage of fluid either around the needle or around the collet. It is contemplated that a relatively small degree of angular displacement of the needlel will be useful and will be permitted where the bore 2G and the opening 244 are sufliciently larger in diameter than needle 26.

In addition to collet 22 and other parts coopera-ting to retain needle 26, I also provide a suitable positive stop in the path of a portion of the needle. This may'take any desired form as, for instance, a pin 25 of smaller dimension than the passage 20 and mounted transversely therein so as to be engaged by the inner end of the needle when it is inserted therein. The stop should not block the ow of fluid through the needle; and for this purpose, may be positioned otf center Iwith respect to the passage 20, or it may be of suitable cross-sectional shape, as indicated in Figs. 1 through 5, so as not to block the lower end opening in the needle. v

The hypodermc needle 26, as shown, is of conventional type, but without hub or bead, is of uniform diameter and has a central bore and a pointed outer end 27; It is contemplated that amount according to my inventi'on will securely hold these needles which-are free from any needle hub, attaching bead' or like enlargement. That portionV of the shank'of needle 26 which engages the collet may be roughened or knurled at 63, as shown in Fig. 14, so as to provide additional frictional grip, if required, between'the collet and needle. The mount is thus adapted to employ needles of relatively simple 4i and inexpensive construction which may be freely discarded 'afferhsel In using a hypodermic device embodying my invention as above described, the cap 23 is rotated to open or noncompressing position to bring collet 22 into normal unstressed condition. The shank end of hypodermic needle 26 may then be easily and rapidly inserted in the mount until it engages the fixedstopZS.` The compression cap 23 is then tightened suiciently to stress collet 22 by compression into secure gripping engagement with the needle 26 to securely retain it in place for employment in the usual manner.

It will thus be seen that my improved three-part hypodermic needle mount issimple to use; and that although the needles may be readily inserted and removed, they are securely retained in the mount while in use. In addition, needle breakage is minimized due to the fact thatpthe needle is free to rock slightly against lateral cushioning means so that lateral shocks or impacts imparted thereto are absorbed or minimized by the collet 22 which forms the sole retaining means for the needle.

In'the modi'ed form of my invention shown in Figs. 3' and 4, the outer. endV of tip 18a is not recessed or counterbored as in Figs. land 2. Instead, it is provided with a projecting collar or flange 31 of reduced outside diameter which tits into a coaxial recess in the lower end of collet 32 which is made of resilient material similar'to that of the collet shown in Figs. 1 and 2 andV has a similar central bore and tapered outer end. Thus, the inner `end`of thecollet 32 can be telescoped over flange 31 of'tip 18a andthu's, to that extent, be more securely andV- accurately heldin needle receiving position when cap 23 is loosened or removed.

The collet`stressing means in Figs. 3 and 4 includes, besides cap 23, a plurality of resilient prongs 33 which erribraee'tliev collet and are preferably secured to the outer end of the'tip- When the cap'23 is in the open position' shown in Fig. 3, the prongs project outwardly in parallel relationship and do not apply stress to the collet. When the cap 23 is tightened to the position shown in Fig. 4 it deects' en'd portions of the prongs 33 inwardly causing them to stress th'e collet, with the result that the material thereof'flows into gripping engagement with the needle.' When cap 23'is adjusted'toopen position, the prongs 33 will again spring outwardly, as shown in Fig. 3, relieving the stress'onthe collet and releasing its grip on needle 26.

The cross'pin 34lserving as the positive stop for needle 26 Vmay be of-ditferent cross-sectional configuration `from thatsh'own in the first described form of my invention,A as, for'instan'ce,` triangular; and the assembly shown in Figs; 3' and 4`may be used in the same manner and'to the same advantage as the form of mount shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

Referring now to Fig. 5, I have shown a modified form of-collet 45 applied to a well-known type of removable tip 36 which can readily be attached to and removed from a standard syringe'by actuating a coupling member 38. The barrel'15 of a hypodermic syringe is shown as formed with an integral tip 16 of slightly modified form to which is permanently secured the base tlange 3S of a coupling member which receives the removable tip assembly shown generally at 36.

The coupling member includes the externally tapered neck portion 37 and the larger concentric ange 38 disposed ther'earound and both of which are secured to the base portion 39 which in turn is integral with the base ange 35. Theange 38 is internally threaded as shown at 40. The" removable tip assembly is provided with a tubular connecting portion 41 at its lower end which is internally ared so as to tit over the tapered neck 37 and is provided with external `threads 42 which mesh with the threads 40.l

The tip assembly may be coupled with the syringe by applying the lower end thereofrto the neck 37 and turning the tip assembly a clockwise direction so that the threads cause the ared coupling portion 41 to tightly grip and tightly engage and seal against the outer surface of the tapered neck 37. The parts may be uncoupled by turning the tip assembly in an anti-clockwise direction.

The tip 36 is in general similar to tip 18a, Figs. 3 and 4, being provided with a similar internal bore or passage 20 larger in diameter than any of the needles to be received therein. Tip 36 is also threaded at 19 to receive a stress applying member, such as cap 23, as shown in Figs. l and 2. A suitable positive stop for the needle is also provided as, for instance, cross pin 25 extending across the passage 2d. A retaining flange 44 similar to flange 31, Figs. 3 and 4, projects beyond the outer end of tip 36 as shown so as to receive and hold in place the collet 45 made of suitably resilient materials, as above described in connection with collets 22 and 32. Said collet shown in Fig. 5 is, however, of cylindrical shape and of uniform inside and outside diameter from end to end. The inside diameter of collet 45 is considerably larger than the diameter of the needle to be inserted therein but of such dimension that, when the cap is tightened, the collet is stressed sufficiently to cause it to flow into gripping engagement with the needle.

In Figs. 6 and 7, I have shown a tip 18]; having a central needle receiving bore or passageway 20 partially blocked at its inner end by a projection 47 which presents a shoulder 47a and defines an eccentrically disposed passageway 48, so that when needle 26 is inserted in the bore 20, its inner end will engage and rest on the shoulder 47a which thus serves as a positive stop. However, as shown in Fig. 7, at least a portion of the opening through the needle communicates with the eccentric passage 48 so that the uid contents of the hypodermic syringe can be expelled through the needle. In other respects, the needle mount shown in Figs. 6 and 7 is similar to that shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

In Fig. 8 I have shown a modified form of needle mount wherein the parts are so arranged that the discharge end of the syringe may serve as the positive stop for the needle. Thus, flange 51 of tip 18C is permanently secured to the neck 16 of the syringe 15 with bore 20 communicating with bore 50 of'said syringe. The bore or passage 2t) is somewhat larger in diameter than the largest needle to be used therewith and is also larger than the passage 50. Accordingly, needles of greater outside diameter than the passage 50 may be received therein, as shown, and with their inner ends resting on the end of neck 16" at the end of the syringe barrel which thus serves as a positive stop while at the same time fluid may be expelled through the passage 50 into `the bore of the needle.

The tubular collet 53 of rubber or the like, as in previously described collets, is tapered at both ends as shown and assembled with its inner end nested into a tapered recess 54 provided in the outer end of tip 18C. The inner end of collet 53 is recessed as shown at 55 to receive an attaching flange 31 provided at the outer end of tip 18e. The opening through collet 53 is at least as large as the passage 20 through 18C so that the needle 26 may be freely inserted in said passage and said opening when the collet is in unstressed condition.

The needle mount above described and as shown in Fig. 8 is used in similar fashion to those previously described and is particularly suitable for use with larger diameter needles and should generally not be used with small needles.

As shown in Figs. 9 and 10, a mount such as that shown in Figs. 3 and 4, may also be employed to receive a modified form of needle, as 26' which is provided with a laterally offset portion such as the small bend 57 positioned to engage an upper edge portion of the tip 18a. Said needles 26 are of uniform diameter from end to end and are free of any attaching hub or bead. The lateral offset or bend 57 does not involve any sharp angles and, accordingly, does not materially affect the cross-sectional area of the bore or the passage of fluid through the needle.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 9 and 10, a tip 18a is provided with an internal passage 20 and exterior threads 19 which engage with the threaded cap 23 serving to stress collet 60 which, as in other forms of my invention, is made of a material having the characteristics of rubber. The opening through collet 60 is at least as large as the passage 20 when the collet is in unstressed position, and passage 20 and end opening 24 are large enough to permit some rocking or inclining displacement of needle 26 when it encounters a laterally applied force. Said collet 60 has a cylindrical external diameter but is recessed as shown at its lower end to accommodate the attaching ange 61. The opening 24 through cap 23 as well as the opening through collet 6i), when the collet is in unstressed condition, are large enough to permit passage of the offset 57 to operative position. However, the passage 20 while receiving the lower end of needle 26 is not large enough to accommodate the offset S7 with the result that the later rests upon an upper edge portion of the ange 61 which thus serves as a positive stop. ln use, needle 26 is inserted in the mount until the offset 57 comes to the position just described. Thereupon cap 23 is tighened, stressing the rubber collet 6d and causing it to grip needle 26 and retain it securely in place for use.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that l have provided an improved hypodermic needle mount which serves to retain the needle firmly in place when in use; which includes a positive stop that limits the inward displacement of the needle even when considerable force is applied thereto; and which may be readily opened and closed when desired to permit the convenient insertion and removal of the needle. The mount also provides means for cusioning hypodermic needles against shocks or impacts imparted to the needle in a transverse or lateral direction. Furthermore, a mount according to my invention permits the use in one embodiment of relatively simple and inexpensive needles of various sizes which can be discarded if desired after use and which can be packaged in a sterile package which facilitates shipping, storage and use of the needles without contamination. It also appears that a needle mount having the structural features above described lends itself particularly to effective use in situations, as the battlefield or public calamities, where many patients must be treated in minimum time with optimum effect.

Modifications may be made in the illustrated and described embodiments of the invention without departing from the invention as set forth in the accompanying claims.

l. An improved hypodermic needle mount for releasably retaining in place a hypodermic needle of substantially uniform diameter from end to end and cooperable to be applied to a hypodermic syringe barrel comprising: a tip having a passage therein cooperable to be applied to a hypodermic syringe barrel with the passage in communication with the barrel; a collet made of a flexible resilient material having the characteristics of rubber positioned coaxially with said passage, said collet being in tubular form with a central opening large enough when the collet is in normal unstressed condition to freely receive the shank of a hypodermic needle to be retained in the mount; a collet stressing cap operatively engaging the collet and adjustable on said tip to apply stress to the collet and thereby cause portions thereof to ow into gripping engagement with a hypodermic needle inserted therein to provide the sole means for retaining the needle in the mount; and means providing a positive stop associated with said tip adjacent the passage therein for engaging the needle to limit the inward displacement thereof.

2. An improved hypodermic needle mount of the type set forth in claim 1 in which the tip is threaded and the collet stressing cap is in threaded engagement with the threads of the tip.

3. Anl improved hypodermic needle-.mount as 'set .for-th in claim 1 in which the positive stop comprises a pin ofsmaller transverse dimension -than-the= passage mounted 1n said tip and extendingflacross the passage.

4. An improved hypodermicneedle mount'fas-set forth in claim 1 which includes resilientprongs embracing/the collet, yand the collet stressingpcapphas threaded engagement with the tip and is engageablewith said prongs -to deflect end portions thereof inwardly upon thecollet.

5. An improved hypodermic needle mount-for releasably retaining in place a hypodermic needle of substantially uniform diameter from end to end an'cl.-cooperabl`e to be applied to a hypodermic syringe barrel comprising: a tubular tip having an externally `threaded portion and a passage extending therethrough and largerI in diameter than the` hypodermic needle to be inserted thereinrsaidtipI beingI cooperable to be applied to av hypodermic syringe barrel with the passage in communication withfthey barrel; a-

tubular collet made of a iiexible resilient ymaterial having;

the characteristics of rubber and having a centralopening large enough when the collet is in'lnormal: unstressedl condition to freely receive the shankof al hypodermic needle to be retained in the mount, said tip andcollet having cooperating means for retaining Zthem inE assembled relationship with the collet extending beyond and engaging the end of the tip and with the opening therein forming a continuation of the passage in the tip; colletstressing means including an internally threaded cap appliedto thethreaded portion of the tip and operatively engaging thev collet whereby the cap may be adjusted on the-tip to apply stress to the collet and cause portions thereof to -low into gripping engagement with a hypodermicneedlel inserted to thereby provide the sole retaining means to` retain-the needle in the mount, said cap having an opening through its outer end larger than the needle to .beinserted therein: for accommodating the needle; and means providing a positive stop associated with said tip,v adjacent the *passage therein for engaging the needle to limit the inward displacement thereof.

6. An improved hypodermic needle mount as set forth in claim 5 in which the cooperating retaining'meansl on the tip and collet includes a recess iny the end-fof the tipi 8 and a'complementary projeotingf portion formed on the end of the collet.

7: An improved hypodermic needle mount as set forth inv claim 5 in which the cooperating retaining means on theitip and collet includes a ange of reduced diameter compared to the tip projectingrfrom the end of the said tipA and frictionally engaging the inner surface of theV collet. v

8. An improved hypodermic needle mount as set forth in claim 5 in which the cooperating retaining means on the tip and collet includes aplurality of spring prongs projecting from the end ofthe tip and embracing the collet, saidV prongs being in operative engagement with7 the cap so that when the latter is tightened it engages `the prongs to cause them to .apply stress tothe collet.

9. In a hypodermic needle mount, the' combination of a tip' having a longitudinal bore arranged and adapted tof receive a portion of a needle shank,"'needle retaining means carried at one end of said tip and adjustably movable for gripping yand releasing a needle shank whereby the needleis prevented from being pulled out of-the mount when said retaining means is in gripping engagement with said shank, and stop means carried by said tip in the form of a rod-extending transversely across the bore in position to be engaged by the inner end of the needle and 4effectively limitl the extent of endwise inward movement of said needle therein.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/241, 285/148.13, 604/243, 285/354
International ClassificationA61M5/34
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/346, A61M5/344, A61M5/347
European ClassificationA61M5/34C