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Publication numberUS2856297 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1958
Filing dateMay 10, 1956
Priority dateMay 10, 1956
Publication numberUS 2856297 A, US 2856297A, US-A-2856297, US2856297 A, US2856297A
InventorsHenry C Geen
Original AssigneeSimoniz Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Polishing composition
US 2856297 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent POLISHING COMPOSITION Henry C. Geen, Grand Rapids, Mich., assignor to Simoniz Company, a corporation of Delaware No Drawing. Application May 10, 1956 Serial No. 583,938

7 Claims. (Cl. l063) This invention relates to a wax-free polishing composition of the aerosol type adapted to be sprayed onto a surface.

It has been customary practice in the past to prepare polishes containing varying amounts of wax in combination with a liquid carrier. In some instances, the wax has been dissolved in a solvent, while in others it has been both dissolved and suspended in a solvent. Where the amount of solvent has been relatively small, the polish has been in the form of a paste with the Wax being both dispersed and dissolved in the liquid. These polishing compositions are applied to wood, metal, lacquer, enamel, varnished surfaces, and other similar surfaces with the intention of giving them a high luster and an attractive, polished surface.

One of the features of this invention is to provide a polishing composition that is wax-free and that is of the aerosol type in which the polishing composition contains a dispersant that is gaseous at ordinary room temperatures and pressures, with the composition being adapted to be retained under superatmospheric pressure in a container so that it may be sprayed over the surface desired by releasing this pressure through a small orifice valve in the customary manner. Dispersants for aerosol products are well known and widely used for many different purposes.

The wax-free polishing composition of this invention includes a combination of an anti-blotching agent, a solvent in which the agent is substantially completely dissolved at ordinary room temperatures, a dispersant that is gaseous at ordinary room temperatures and pressures and which must be confined under pressure when at room temperature, and a minor proportion of a liquid silicone.

The anti-blotching agent is preferably present in an amount of about 0.1-9.0 parts by weight of the composition, with an especially preferred range being about 0.3- parts. The agent is adapted to fill up any cracks in the surface such as often are present in minute form in varnished and finished wood surfaces.

Among the anti-blotching agents that may be used are lauric isopropanolamide, Arochlor 1268 (chlorinated biphenyl containing about 68% chlorine), and Naccanol NRSF, which is sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate.

The solvent is preferably present in an amount of about 30-50 parts by weight of the composition. This solvent includes Freon l1 (trichloromonofiuoromethane), Freon 113 (trichlorotrifluoroethane), carbon tetrachloride, methylene chloride, chloroform, orthodichlorobenzene, ethylene dichloride, perchloroethylene, trichloro ethylene, benzene, toluene, xylene, coal-tar naphtha, ethyl ether, diisopropyl ether, hexyl ether, amyl acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, Z-ethyl hexanol, cyclohexane, gasoline, mineral seal oil, V. M. and P. naphtha, Stoddards solvent, mineral spirits, etc., and in some cases, acetone, butanol, dioxane, ethanol, heptadecanol, isopropanol, diethyl cellosolve (Carbide and Carbon Company), etc. Thus, the solvent employed should be a liquid, organic material which is a solvent for the silicone employed, and is a .of about 3050 parts by weight.

2,856,297 Patented Oct. 14, 1958 solvent-dispersant for the anti-blotching agent which is employed. In some cases, as'with the Freons for example, the solvent can also function as the propellent and vice versa. The solvent should not have a solvent action on the finish which is to be polished, and thus, where. a plain metal surface is to be polished, all of the foregoing solvents will be satisfactory. However, where a nitrocellulose lacquer or varnish, or some alkyd resin finishes, are to be polished, a selection of the solvent to be employed should be rather carefully done, in order that the finish itself may not be deleteriously aifected by the solvent.

The dispersant that is gaseous at ordinary room temperatures and pressures is preferably used in an amount These dispersants include Freon 12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and Freon 114 (dichlorotetrafluoroethane) as well as many other dispersants that are gaseous at ordinary temperatures and that are well known in the art. These dispersants are preferably blended to produce the desired boiling point so as to avoid dangerous and excessive pressures in the container from which the polishing composition is dispensed.

The silicone materials employed are liquids of substantially linear structure, are substantially non-volatile, and are organopolysiloxanes, preferably essentially polyalkylsiloxanes, and most desirably liquid polydialkylsiloxanes such as dimethyl or diethylpolysiloxanes. A liquid silicone having a minimum of about five centistokes viscosity constitutes the lowest practical operative material which will be employed in most applications. However, a viscosity below about 5,000,000 centistokes constitutes a preferred maximum therefor, and a polydimethylsiloxane having a viscosity range between about 50 to about 10,000 centistokes and a polydiethylsiloxane having a viscosity range between about 5,000 and 100,000 centistokes is the optimum preferred range therefor.

Because of the solubility characteristics of the ingredients, the composition of this invention in its preferred form is a clear product with substantially no sediment. Furthermore, when it is sprayed on furniture or other surface, it wipes off easily to give a good gloss, depth, and clarity.

Example I.In one example of preparing the composition of this invention, the following ingredients were mixed together and packaged in a pressurized container at a pressure of about 40-45 pounds per square inch gauge:

Parts Laurie isopropanolamide 0.5 Methylene chloride 25.0 Dimethylpolysiloxane, 350 centistokes viscosity 2.0 Freon l2 50.0 Freon 11 25.0

These ingredients were mixed together at a temperature of 25 F. and introduced into the pressurized valve container.

Example 2.A similar composition was prepared in a similar manner but having the following formula:

Parts Arochlor 1268 2.0 Dimethylpolysiloxane, 350 centistokes viscosity 2.0 Freon 11 50.0 Freon l2 "L 50.0

in which said composition is retained under superatmospheric pressure, consisting essentially of: about 0.3-5 parts of an anti-blotching agent adapted to be deposited as a film on said surface, saidagent being of the class consisting of lauric isopropanolamide and chlorinated polyphenyls; about 30-50 parts of a solvent in which said agent is substantially completely dissolved at ordinary room temperatures; about 30-50 parts of a propellant that is gaseous at ordinary room' temperatures and pressures; and about 0.3-5 parts of a liquid, substantially linear, substantially non-volatile polyalkylsiloxane soluble in said solvent, all said parts being by weight of the composition.

2. An aerosol type wax-free polishing composition adapted to be dispersed onto asurface from a container in which said composition is retained under superatmospheric pressure, consisting essentially of: about 0.3-5 parts of an anti-blotching agent adapted to be deposited as a film on said surface, said agent including isopropanolamide; about 30-50 parts of a solvent in which said agent is substantially completely dissolved at ordinary room temperatures; about 30-50 parts of a propellant that is gaseous at ordinary room temperatures and pressures; and about 0.3-5 parts of a liquid, substantially linear, substantially non-volatile polyalkylsiloxane soluble in said solvent, all said parts being by weight of the composition.

3. An aerosol type wax-free polishing composition adapted to be dispersed onto a surface from a container in which said composition is retained under superatmospheric pressure, consisting essentially of: about 0.3-5 parts of an anti-blotching agent adapted to be deposited as a film on said surface, said agent including chlorinated polyphenyls; about 30-50 parts of a solvent in whichsaid agent is substantially completely dissolved at ordinary room temperatures; about 30-50 parts of a propellant that is gaseous at ordinary room temperatures and pressures; and about 0.3-5 parts of a liquid, substantially linear, substantially non-volatile polyalkylsiloxane soluble in said solvent, all said parts being by weight of the composition.

4. An aerosol type wax-free polishing composition adapted to be dispersed onto a surface from a container in which said composition is retained under superatmospheric pressure, consisting essentially of: about 0.3-5

parts of an anti-blotching agent adapted to be deposited as a film on said surface, said agent including chlorinated biphenyl containing about 68% chlorine; about 30-50 parts of a solvent in which said agent is substantially completely dissolved at ordinary room temperatures; about 30-50 parts of a propellant that is gaseous at ordinary room temperatures and pressures; and about 0.3-5 parts of a liquid, substantially linear, substantially non-volatile polyalkylsiloxane soluble in said solvent, all said parts being by weight of the composition.

I 5. An aerosol type wax-free polishing composition adapted to be dispersed onto a surface from a container in which said composition is retained under superatmospheric pressure, consisting essentially of; about 2 parts of chlorinated biphenyl containing about 68% chlorine; about parts of trichloromonofluoromethane; about 50 parts of dichlorodifluoromethane; and about 2 parts of dimethylpolysiloxane, all said parts being by Weight of said composition.

6. An aerosol type wax-flee polishing composition adapted to be dispersed onto a surface. from a container in which said composition is retained under superatmospheric pressure, consisting essentially of: about 0.5 part of lauric isopropanolamide; about 25 parts of methylene chloride; about 25 parts of trichloromonofluoromethane; about 50 parts of dichlorodifluoromethane; and about 2 parts of dimethylpolysiloxane, all said parts being by weight of said composition.

7. An aerosol type wax-free polishing composition adapted to be dispersed onto a surface from a container in which said composition is retained under superatmospheric pressure, consisting essentially of: about 2 parts of chlorinated polyphenyls; about 50 parts of tri- -chloromonofluoromethane; about 50 parts of dichlorodifluoromethane; and about 2 parts of dimethylpolysiloxane, all said parts being by Weight of said composition.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,334,709 Katzman et al. Nov. 23, 1943 2,523,281 Currie Sept. 26, 1950 2,617,780 Lutz Nov. 11, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2334709 *Dec 19, 1940Nov 23, 1943Emulsol CorpEmulsion
US2523281 *Sep 26, 1949Sep 26, 1950 automobile polish
US2617780 *Sep 30, 1948Nov 11, 1952Raymond H LutzCoating compositions containing a synthetic resin and a liquid propellant
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2969328 *Jun 20, 1957Jan 24, 1961Evelyn EllensonComposition for removing coatings
US2978422 *Feb 19, 1959Apr 4, 1961Simoniz CoPressurized polishing composition containing polyvinyl-alcohol and gum tragacanth
US3325415 *May 7, 1965Jun 13, 1967Colgate Pahmolive CompanyEmulsion compositions
US3527723 *Mar 6, 1968Sep 8, 1970Park Chem CoPreservative and dressing coating for automobile vinyl tops and the like
US4464499 *May 19, 1983Aug 7, 1984Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaWax for low gloss resin exterior parts of an automobile
US4790877 *Aug 11, 1987Dec 13, 1988Rojef Distributors, Inc.Silicone emulsion polishes and their formulation
US4936914 *Dec 20, 1988Jun 26, 1990S. C. Johnson & Con, Inc.Film-forming emulsion polish compositions containing copolymeric siloxanes
US5112394 *Aug 28, 1990May 12, 1992S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Furniture polish concentrate and formulations
US5397384 *Feb 4, 1994Mar 14, 1995Colgate Palmolive Co.Hydrocarbon solvents, silicones, nonionic surfactants and tall oil derivatives
US5470504 *Jan 21, 1994Nov 28, 1995Bardahl Manufacturing CorporationCleaning, polishing, lubricating composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/3, 516/8, 106/8, 516/7, 106/11
International ClassificationC11D17/00
Cooperative ClassificationC11D17/0043
European ClassificationC11D17/00E