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Publication numberUS2856895 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1958
Filing dateJan 18, 1956
Priority dateJan 18, 1956
Publication numberUS 2856895 A, US 2856895A, US-A-2856895, US2856895 A, US2856895A
InventorsAnderson Donald E, Lindberg George I
Original AssigneeUnited States Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for handling elongated articles
US 2856895 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1958 D. E. ANDERSON ET AL APPARATUS FOR HANDLING ELONGATED ARTICLES Filed Jan. 18, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 8 h INVENTORS. DONALD E nn/omso/v and GEORGE I. Ll/VDBERG,

' their Attorney Oct. 21, 1958 D. E. ANDERSON ET AL 2,856,395

APPARATUS FOR HANDLING ELONGATED ARTICLES Fil ed Jan. 18, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 //V VENTOl-PS.

DONAL D E. ANDERSON and GEORGE I. L lNDBE/PG,

Maia wwfic their Affomey.

Oct. 21, 1958 D. E. ANDERSON ETAL 2,355,895

APPARATUS FOR HANDLING ELONGATED ARTICLES Fild Jan. 18, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS DONALD E ANDERSON and GEORGE L L/NDBERG, 5Y5 $471 4) A ZZEQ Oct. 21, 1958 V D. E. ANDERSON ET AL 2,

APPARATUS FOR HANDLING ELONGATED ARTICLES Filed Jan. 18, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN VE N TORS. DONALD E ANDERSON and GEORGE I. L IIVDBERG,

lfieir Attorney.

I Oct. 21, 1958 D. E. ANDERSON ET AL 2,355,895

' APPARATUS FOR HANDLING ELONGATED ARTICLES Filed Jan. 18, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Z mm 0N 0 1 N 6 E MW 0 D AW L 0 E I 0 Mm 0 s 05 m w VI 3 their Attorney.

APPARATUS FOR HANDLING ELONGATED ARTICLES Donald E. Anderson and George I. Lindberg, Duluth, lVlinn., assignors to United States Steel Corporation, a corporation of New Jersey Application January 18, 1956, Serial No. 559,856

6 Claims. (Cl. 118-423) vantages that it can introduce fence posts into a galvanizing bath in a horizontal position and then move them through the bath at a predetermined rate with a minimum of disturbance or splashing of the bath. It has the further advantage that it can eject the fence posts from the galvanizing bath in a manner that causes the excess spelter to be shaken off of each fence is ejected from the bath.

Having reference to the accompanying drawings illustrating this exemplary apparatus, the various figures are as follows:

Figure 1 is a plan view;

Figure 2 is a longitudinal section taken along the plane of line IIII of Figure 1, with parts in elevation;

Figure 3 is a transverse section taken along the plane of line IIIIII of Figure l, with parts in elevation;

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3 showing certain parts in alternate positions; 1

Figure 5 is a portion of Figure 3 shown to enlarged scale;

Figure 6 is a partial elevation showing a gear drive; and

Figure 7 is an enlarged view taken on the line VII-VII of Figure 1.

It is believed that the detailed description of the invention will be more readily understood if preceded by the following general description of the apparatus and the functions performed thereby.

In general the apparatus comprises a chain and sprocket conveyor which serves to transfer fence posts in a horizontal position from a pre-heating furnace to the entrance side of a galvanizing pot. Curved upper guides are provided around the discharge end of the conveyor for conducting the fence posts discharged therefrom to a set of curved lower guides which extend downwardly into the molten bath contained in the galvanizing pot. The fence posts are carried progressively through the bath along the curved lower guides in the pockets of a plurality of starwheels which are mounted on a common shaft lengthwise of the bath. Retractable restraining levers or arms are normally provided which bridge the path of the fence posts between the upper and lower guides. The restrain ing arms control the movement of the fence posts from the conveyor onto the lower guides restraining the movement of each entering fence post until an empty pocket on the starwheels is in proper position to receive it. Movement of the restraining arms is synchronized to that of the starwheels so thatonce fence post is fed to each post as it empty pocket of the starwheels as it reaches position to receive the same.

Ejector arms, whose movement is also synchron zed with the rotation of the starwheels, extend down nto the bath adjacent the discharge ends of the lower guides which curve away from the peripheries of the starwheels. As each fence post reaches the curved away portions of the lower guides the ejector arms pick up the post and lift it to a stop means whereby movement of the fence post is restrained while the ejector arm travels on. The stop members are provided with projections at their lower portions which receive and support the fence post after it is swept from the ejector arms when it strikes the stop members. The arrested fence post falls onto the projection with a jar which serves to shake the excess spelter from the surface of the post. A pair of withdrawal arms are provided to remove the fence post from the projections and carry it to the run-out table for conveyance to storage or shipping.

The speeds of the feeding conveyor, restraining arms, starwheels, ejector arms and withdrawal arms are synchronized so that the fence posts are passed through the bath and are removed therefrom progressively in a continuous and automatic operation. The speed of the operation may be varied as desired by varying the synchronized speeds of the various elements of the apparatus of the invention.

Referring more particularly to the drawings reference numeral 2 indicates generally a supporting framework positioned over a conventional galvanizing pot 4 containing a molten bath 6 of flux and zinc. The frame includes upstanding beams 8 which are based on the mill floor adjacent the sides and end of the pot 4 and horizontal supporting cross-beams 10 which extend transversely over the pot 4 for supporting the apparatus of the invention.

A chain and sprocket conveyor 12 leading from a preheating furnace (not shown) is positioned with its discharge end above the entrance side of the galvanizing pot 4. The conveyor 12 functions to transfer fence posts P in a horizontal position from the drying furnace to the galvanizing pot. A plurality of adjustable aligned curved upper guides 14 extend downwardly around the discharge end of the conveyor in spaced relation therewith and serve to guide the fence posts being discharged from the conveyor onto the inclined receiving skid portions 15 of the lower curved aligned guides 16 which are spaced below the discharge ends of the guides 14. The lower guides 16 extend downwardly into the batch 6, as best shown in Figures 3-5. Three starwheels 18 are keyed on a common shaft 20 which is journaled lengthwise of the bath. Each of the starwheels is positioned adjacent a lower guide 16 and carry the fence posts progressively therealong through the bath. Retractable restraining arms 21 which normally bridge the spaces between the aligned upper and lower guides control the movement of the fence posts into the bath.

A pair of ejector arms 22 extend downwardly into the bath adjacent the discharge ends 24 of the lower guides 16. Ends 24 of the guides 16 curve away from the peripheries of the starwheels 1% and the ejector arms ZZfunction to lift each fence post from the portions 24 of the lower guides and travel in an orbital path 28 to carry it to stop members 26 which arrest the travel of the fence post while the ejector arm completes its cycle of travel. Each of the stop members 26 is provided with a lower projection or platform 30 which receives the fence post after its travel is arrested and it falls from the ejector arms 22.

A pair of withdrawal hooks 32, each carried by a generally vertically disposed beam 34 which in turn is pivotally supported by a link arm 36 rigidly mounted Patented Oct. 21, 1958.

by one end on a power shaft 38, lifts the fence post from the platforms 39 and carries it in an ascending path (indicated by the reference numeral 48) directed away from the-discharge sideof the-pot 4 to a stop member 42 which arrests the movement of the fence post and causesit to-drop to :an inclined surface 44 from where it slides onto a run-out table 46. The run-out table conveys the fence post to a point where the post is removed fromthe tableand stacked for shipping or storage.

The-conveyor 12 is driven by a drive shaft 48 which is powered by a motor driven gear reducer 59 by means of sprocket 52 and-chain 54. A sprocket 56 is keyed to shaft-48-spaced from the sprocket 52 and is connected with and. drives a rotating cam limit switch 58 for a purpose to'be-further explained.

A ,gear (it) which is-mountedon the end of shaft 48 opposite its driving end meshes with a gear 62 keyed to a short shaft 64 disposed directly below shaft 48. Sprocket 66 is keyedon the end of the shaft 64. Shaft 20 upon which starwheels 18 are-keyed, is driven through a sprocket 68 keyed to-the endthereof, which in turn is connected by a chain to sprocket 66. The driving arrangement for shaft 20 is best shown in Figures and 6. With this driving'arrangement the-operations of the conveyor :12 and starwheels 18 are synchronized, mak ing it possible for the Starwheels '18 to receive a post each timethe empty pockets thereof arrive at the point between-thez-upper guides14 and lower guides 16. The cam limit switch 58 is operated by rotation of the shaft 48 and controls the operation of a motor reducer 70 which is connected to and rotates ashaft 72.

Starwheels 18 revolve in -a clockwise direction and when alignedempty pockets thereon reach the position between the upper and lower guides, the pair of restraining levers or arms 21 which are operated by rotation of shaft 72 move backward or to the left as shown in Figure 4, and allow a post to fall from the skid portions 15 into the talignedempty pockets on the starwheels 18.

The arms 21 are mounted on a short rocker shaft 76 with one arm being keyed to each end of theshaft. Shaft 76 is connected to shaft 72 by means of an eccentric1-hub 78, eccentric strap 80, connecting arm 82-and lever-84. Thezconnection between the shaft 48 and the cam limitJsWitch 58-is such 'that each time a post is discharged from the sprockets 12a on the discharge end of the conveyor '12, the motor reducer 78 is actuated by the limit switch 58 to rotate shaft 72 one revolution. One revolution of the shaft 72 rocks the shaft 76 and causes the arms 21 to release a fence post from the inclined skids -15 permitting it to fall. into the aligned empty pocketsiofthe starwheels18.

Ejector arms 22, which lift the fence post from the guides 16 when it reaches the curved away portions 24 are also operated by shaft '72. At the time levers 21 move awayfrom guides 14 and i6 and allow a post to slide into the empty pockets of starwheels 18, ejector arms 22 start a clockwise movement along the orbital path28 to lift a post ofi of skids 16 and carry it up to stops 26 from whence the=post falls onto the projections 30. The ejector arms 22 are mounted on the ends of a short shaft 88 by means of cranks 99. The shaft 88 is journaled in bearings 92 which are carried by brackets attached to the frame 2. Shaft 88 is driven by shaft 72 through a chain connection between a sprocket 94 mounted-on shaft 72 and a sprocket 96 mounted on shaft 38. Each of the ejector arms 22 is pivotally connected to an adjustable link arm 98 at a point midway of the ejector arm length. The link arms 98 provide adjustment for the orbital path of travel of the extremities of :arrns 22 and are pivotally mounted on the ends of a pivot shaft 100 which in turn is pivotally supported by brackets 182 depending from the frame 2. After the ejector arms 22'have completed their path of travel over path 28 the motor reducer '78 is stopped by the rotating cam-limit switch 58.

At the time each post drops onto the projecting portions 30 of the stops 26, the drawing hooks 32 move upward along the path 48 as best shown in Figures 3 and 4 and pick up the post from the projecting portion 30 and carry it until it strikes the stop 42 causing it to drop onto the inclined surface 44 from when it slides onto the run-out table 46. Hooks 32 are mounted on the lower ends of I beams 34 by means of brackets 34a. The upper ends of the spaced beams 34 are pivotally connected to the ends of arms 36 by means of a cross bar 34b and the lower ends are connected by means of a cross bar 34c. Arms 36 .are keyed to the shaft 38 which is connected with and rotated by a motor reducer 184 mounted on the frame 2. Shaft 38 is connected with the motor reducer 184 through a crank arm 106, adjustable link 188 and crank disc 110. Each of the beams 34 is pivotally connected at a point intermediate its length with an adjustable .guide link arm .112 which in turn is pivotally connected to a bracket 114 carried by a vertical beam 116. Theguide link arms 112 provide adjustment for the path-of travel of the extremities of hooks 32. Counterweights 118 are hung on each end of shaft 38 by means of arms .120 for the purpose of counterbalancing'the withdrawing hook arm assemblies. Motor reducer lti iis controlled :by cam 122 carried on shaft 72 which actuates a cam limit :switch 124 that energizes and deenergizes the motor reducer.

In operation, conveyor -12 is operated to move ,fence posts P in horizontal position from a drying furnace (not shown) .to the entranceside of the galvanizing pot 4. As the fence posts .1 travel around the discharge end ,of the conveyor .each is conducted by upper guides 14 ,t o inclined skid portions 1S of lower guides 16. Each fence post is held on the skid 15 by the restraining arms 21 until empty pockets of Starwheels 18 are in position for receiving the fence post. Rotation of shaft-72 bymotor reducer .70 which .is energized by cam limit switch 58 which in turn is operated by movement of the-conveyor 12, as described above causes the arms 21 to swingbut of restrainingposition momentarily to permit a fence post to drop into the aligned open pockets of Starwheels :18. Starwheels 18 push each fence post along the guides 16 until itreaches thecurved away portions 24 of the guides at which pointejectorarms .22 are put into motion by rotation of shaft 72 to pick upthe-fence post and lift it up to stops 2.6 which arrest the travel ofthe fencepost while the ejector arms continue in their path of travel backto-their original position. One complete revolution of the shaft 272 causes simultaneous movement of the lever arm 21 from restraining to nonrestraining position and return simultaneously with the travel. of ejector arms 22 on acomplete circuitof their orbital paths 28. Stops 26 arrest the movement of the fence post and cause'it to drop with a jar on the platform.30 thus causing excess spelter to-be shaken from the post. After-shaft =72;has rotated a predetermined amount and before it has completed one full revolutionthe cam 122 trips limit switch 124 and causes energization of motor reducer104 which, through .crank arm 5106 link 108 and crank disc 110, rotates shaft 38. Rotation of shaft 38 causes the books 32 to move upwardly in paths '40-to lift the fence post'from theprojectionsfSt) and carry it tostop members 42 which arrest the travel ofthe fence post while the hooks 32 travel oncausing the fence post to drop to-the inclined skid surfaces 44 and from there onto run-out table 46.

Although Ihave shown the use of motor reducers actuated by cam limit switches for rotating-shafts 38 and 72, it should be noted that, if desired, mechanical gearing connections with shaft 48 may be provided for driving shafts'38 and '72.

Whileone embodiment of our invention has been shown and described, .it'willbe apparent that otheradaptations and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for progressively passing elongated articles through a bath comprising a lower guide in said bath, the upper end of said guide being disposed above the entrance side of said bath, a plurality of starwheels spaced lengthwise of the bath cooperating with said lower guide to move the articles progressively through the bath, the end portion of said lower guide remote from its said upper end being curved away from the peripheries of said starwheels adjacent the side of said bath opposite the entrance side thereof, automatic means for feeding said articles to said starwheels, automatic means for ejecting said articles from said starwheels, said ejecting means including a drive shaft, a rotatable shaft, a driving connection between said drive shaft and said rotatable shaft, a pair of cranks mounted on said rotatble shaft, an ejector arm mounted by one end on each of said cranks and depending therefrom into said bath adjacent the curved-away portions of said guides, a rotatable pivot shaft spaced from said rotatable shaft in parallel relationship therewith, a pair of link arms pivotally attached to said pivot shaft, each of said link arms extending from said pivot shaft to a pivotal connection with one of said ejector arms at a point intermediate its length for controlling the path of travel of the free end of the ejector arm, means for rotating said drive shaft whereby said rotatable shaft is rotated and said ejector arms travel in an orbit to push the articles upwardly along the curved-away portions of said guides, and stops in the orbital paths of said ejector arms for restraining the ejected article as said ejector arms move on.

2. Apparatus as defined by claim 1 characterized by each of said stops having a support spaced therebelow for abruptly arresting the article after it has been restrained by the stops and falls from the ejector arms.

3. Apparatus for progressively passing elongated articles through a bath comprising a lower guide in said bath, the upper end of said guide being disposed above the entrance side of said bath, a plurality of starwheels spaced lengthwise of the bath cooperating with said lower guide to move the articles progressively through the bath, auto- 6 matic means for feeding said articles to said starwheels, automatic means for ejecting said articles from said starwheels to a position above said bath, and means at the side of said bath remote from its entrance side for lifting the articles singly from said position.

4. Apparatus for passing elongated articles through a bath as defined by claim 3 in which said lifting means includes a pair of spaced elongated generally vertical beams each pivotally mounted at its upper end to one end of a first link element, a hook carried by the lower end of each of said beams and extending towards said bath, a pair of second link elements each pivotally connected at one end to each of said beams at a point intermediate the ends thereof, the other end of each of said second link elements being pivotally mounted adjacent its associated beam, said second elements being effective to control the path of travel of a hook-bearing ends of the beams, a power shaft rotatably mounted above said beams, each of said first link elements being rigidly attached to said power shaft by its other end, means connected with said power shaft for rotating the same whereby said hooks are moved in an ascending path directed away from said bath to remove an article from said position.

5. Apparatus as defined by claim 4 including stops in the paths of said hooks for restraining said article as said hooks move on.

6. Apparatus as defined by claim 5 including supports spaced below said stops for receiving the restrained article after the hook moves on.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 663,034 Lynch Dec. '4, 1900 2,184,610 Church Dec. 26, 1939 2,642,368 Wallace et a1. June 16, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 510,235 Great Britain July 24, 1939 843,712 France July 10, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US663034 *Oct 28, 1899Dec 4, 1900Nat Tube CoApparatus for dipping pipes or bars.
US2184610 *Mar 29, 1937Dec 26, 1939Fretz Moon Tube Company IncCoating apparatus
US2642368 *Jan 19, 1950Jun 16, 1953Leland R MansellCoating metal articles by dipping in bath of dissimilar molten metal
FR843712A * Title not available
GB510235A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3108699 *Jan 5, 1961Oct 29, 1963Pipe Machinery CompanyUnidirectional feed and chucking apparatus for transferring and chucking elongated articles for machining
US3366258 *May 12, 1964Jan 30, 1968Chemetron CorpApparatus for storing and transferring rails
US3410200 *Jun 14, 1965Nov 12, 1968VallourecAutomatic equipment for galvanizing tubes
US3610437 *Jan 16, 1970Oct 5, 1971Alexandr Alexandrovich SukhanoDevice for tube transfer in tube-rolling mill
US3757927 *Sep 13, 1971Sep 11, 1973Gen ElectricBar stock storage dispensing and feeding apparatus and method
US4073978 *Nov 12, 1976Feb 14, 1978Southwire CompanyImmersion-treating tubular elements
US4299189 *May 6, 1980Nov 10, 1981Aktiebolaget IndeskoDipping device
US5985365 *Oct 16, 1998Nov 16, 1999Galvanizing Services Co., Inc.Method and automated apparatus for galvanizing threaded rods
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/423, 118/426, 118/500, 118/425, 414/680
International ClassificationC23C2/00
Cooperative ClassificationC23C2/003
European ClassificationC23C2/00B