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Publication numberUS2857519 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1958
Filing dateAug 2, 1956
Priority dateAug 2, 1956
Publication numberUS 2857519 A, US 2857519A, US-A-2857519, US2857519 A, US2857519A
InventorsGaskill George M, Wright Manfred G
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Miniature combination tuning means
US 2857519 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1958 s. M. GASKILL El'AL 2,857,519

' MINIATURE COMBINATION TUNING MEANS Filed Aug. 2, 1956 '1 Sheets-Sheet 1 "WI W I Amm? n i @w izwm Oct. 21, I958 MIGASKILL ETAL 2,857,519 I MINIATURE COMBINATION TUNING MEANS Filed Aug. 2, 195s 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORAEY -Oct. 21, 1958 G; M. GASKILL ETAL MINIATURE COMBINATION TUNING MEANS Filed Aug. 2, 1 956- 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 222335221 QIZ/FMGI z f? M AmRNFY Oct? 1953 I M. GASKILL ETALV 2,357,519

MINIATURE COMBINATION TUNING MEANS Filed Aug. 2 1956 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS "Y z z w Amp/m Oct. 21, 1958 I G. M. GASKILL ET AL 3 72 MINIATURE COMBINATION TUNING MEANS Filed Aug. 2, 1956 '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Oct. 21, 1958 cs. M. GASKILL ET AL 2,357,519

MINIATURE CQMBINATION TUNING MEANS 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Aug. 2, 1956 IN VENTORS 6225 Oct. 21, 1958 V G. M. GASKILL ETAL MINIATURE COMBINATION TUNING MEANS '7 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed Aug. 2, 195a Uni id tates Pa e 0.

7 1,351,519. Murmurs: MB YAIiQNTT ji 1 George M. Gaskill and Manfred G; Wright, Kok'o'rno, Ind, assigno'rs to General Motors Corporation, Detroit,

Mich a corporation-f Delaware Application August 2', 601,618 14 Claims. (CL-250-40) This invention relates to means for tuning radio apparatus and morespecifically- -to combination tuning means providing manual, mechanical preset specific station and automatic indexing-of the" apparatus operable upon the arrival ofreceived signals. In early radio communication equipment the of the apparatus over a predetermined frequency band was accomplished by some manual means for moving adjustable tuning apparatus. Later preset -mechanical adjustable means was provided which was capable of moving the tuning means quickly to given locations to tune in a plurality of preset and most frequentlylistened to stations. At a still later date tuning equipment was provided .for automatically scanning the frequency band forwhich the apparatus was designed together with automatic indexing means to stop the tuner upon the receipt of an incoming signal from any given station. This latter typeof equipment has been identified as signal seeking tuning means or stop-on-signal apparatus. 1

It is an object in making this invention to provide means for tuning radio apparatus over its designed band which may selectively be operated manually, to preset mechanically locked positions,-or automatically indexed upon the receipt of an incoming signal.

It is a further object in making this invention to provide radio tuning rneans which is a combination of manual, mechanical or signal seeking action, any one type of which may be operated immediatelywithout the necessity of using any selecting or adjusting part to provide the desired type of operation.

It is a still further object in making this invention to provide combination tuning means having a minimum number of operating parts'an'd of minimum size requirements to provide the desired action. 1

With these and other objects in view which will become apparent as the specification proceeds, our invention will be best understood by reference to the following specification and claims and the illustrations in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a front elevation of a radio receivershowing the dial and tuning means mounted therein;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the combination tuning means embodying our invention;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation taken from the left-hand side as shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a bottom plan view of the tuner;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged side elevation taken from the right-hand side of Fig. 1, parts being broken away and shown in section, and taken on lines 5-5 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view from the top taken on lines 6--6 of Fig. 5, parts being broken away and shown in section;

Fig. 6A is a sectional view through the clutch driving portion taken on line 6A of Fig. 6;

Fig. 6B is an enlarged sectional view of the governor gear train load.

7 Fig. 7 is a sectional view showing the solenoid reloading action taken on-line 7--7 of Fig. 8;

Patented Oct. 21, 1958 Fig. 8 is a sectionalview taken on line 8 -8 of Fig; 5 Fig. 9 is a circuit diagram of the control circuit for the loading solenoid; s Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the switch operating mechanism for controlling'ftli'e'loading solenoid; I

Figs. I1, 12 and 13 are each a perspective detail view of one of'the switch actuating levers that provide the compound contro'l fortheloading solenoid.

"Referring now i'n'particulajr to the drawings as shown therein in Fig. 1',the fr'onfpa'nel'Z which maybe the supporting panel in a vehicle and throughwhich the various control means project and also throughfwhich the indicating means visible. P anel2, therefore, contains a rectangular opening '4 through which a. series of push buttons 'Gmay project, the pressure on any one of whichfwill bring thetuner quickly to a predetermined station. Oh one side'a shaft bearing a control knob 8 projects'through the panel and said control knob may operate the on-oflf switch and volume control. Located on the other side of "the panel is a'second rotatable'control knoh 10 which issirnilarly'mounted on a shaft to man- 'ually tune the receiver to desired stations. Between the two knobs 8 and 10 there is a second elongated opening 12 in which ismounted a transparent glass plate to cover the sarne'and' behind which 'a dial 14 may be mounted. The dial is calibrated in terms of frequencies over which the receiver may be tuned and an indicating pointer 16 is provided to move across the dial to indicate the position of the tuning apparatus. Mounted above the dial and projecting through an opening 18 in the pa'nel2 is'a reciprocably movable bar 20 which operates a switch mechanism to controlthesignafseeking action of the tuner. Thus, if the operator desires to; bring the tuner quickly to 'a preset station, pressure on any one of the push buttons 6 will'qui'ckly accomplish the result. If, on the other hand, the operator wishes to signal tune the receiver, h'e momentarily depresses the push bar'20 to complete a control circuit to the signal seeking means which inaugurates I seeking action automatically terminated upon receipt of a signal. Lastly, if he desires to manually tune the receiver to any desired location, he merely rotates the knob 10 to accomplish this end.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 2, the tuning means is shown as including a main base 22 which extends from the left-hand side, as shown in Fig. 3, across to a pointjust beyond the last of the push buttons '6. This flat plate or base supports therebelow in normal position a plurality of slides and on its upper'surface a plurality of means for tuning the receiver. The base 22 also has two side flange portions 24 and 26 that extend downwardly to form a housing below the'plate for the mechanical slide section. A housing 27 is mounted on top of the base 22 by suitable cap screws 28. This housing supports tuning coils 30 whose inductances may be changed to change the tuning of the specific radio circuit in' which they are connected. conventionally, these coils would be connected in the antenna, R. F. and oscillator circuits. In order'to change the inductance of these coils so that the resonant circuits in which they are connected may be tuned, there are provided a plurality of comminuted iron cores '36 which are commonly supported by a transverse bar 38 which is so mounted as to move reciprocably' on the housing 27 and by so doing, move the cores 36 intoand out of their respective coils to tune the apparatus. Each of the cores is connected to the transverse bar 38 by having a'threaded member 37 cast in one end which threaded member is then threaded into an opening in the transverse bar '38 so that each may be adjusted linearly with respect to the others for tracking purposes.

The transverse bar 38 has connected to opposite ends a plug 40 or 42 to carry the bar, which plugs extend 3; through slots 44 in the sides of the housing 27. The plugs 40 and 42 extend beyond the sides of the housing 27 and are each connected to the ends of pivotally mounted levers 46. and 48 by C-shaped-coupling links50 which are snapped over the ends of-the'plugs for application and which have their opposite ends pivotally connected to the levers as, for example, at 52. to the top of the angled lever 46 as best shown in Fig. 3. A bowed spring 51 clamped around the .pivot 52 and extending under the head of plug 42 and bearing against the side of link 50 maintains theas'sembly in position and takes out lost mo'tiom. Link'50onthe right-hand side is similarly connected to the angled lever 48.

These two angled levers in combination with two transverse rods 54 and 56 form a pivotal assembly which may be designated as a treadle bar'assembly. Rod 54 extends across between the .two angled levers above the slide assemblies and rod 56 extends across in the same manner below the slide assemblies. The treadle bar assembly itself is pivoted about an axis midway between the two transverse rods. One end of this axis is determined by an opening 58 in the side wall 24 and a similarly located opening in the lever 46. A small ball bearing 60 is inserted between these two openings and held in place by end pressure when the treadle bar is snapped into position. On the other end a short stub shaft 62 is fixedly secured to the outside surface of angled lever- 48. The axis of this stub shaft 62 coincides'with the axis provided by the I ball bearing 60. This stub shaft 62 projects through an opening in the side frame member 26 and extends through a hollow sleeve 64. Shaft 62 may rotate within the hollow sleeve 64.

Supported across the front of the assembly and secured to the two end plates 24 and 26 is a transverse member 66. This member has a plurality of openings therein and supports the various slide assemblies so that they may move reciprocably in the housing. A similar transverse supporting member 68 is secured across the back of the base to support the rear ends 70 of the slide assemblies. This type of tuner including an adjustable and lockable mechanical cam is shown in Schwarz et a1. 2,489,544, issued November 29, 1949, entitled Radio Tuning Means, and will not be described here in detail. Suflice it to say that each slide assembly is biased toward the front of the tuner by a coil spring 72 mounted between a shoulder on the slide and the end member 68 to bias the slide assembly forward. Each slide assembly includes an adjustable pivoted cam 74 which is held in locked position by a brake lever 76 as fully described in the Schwarz patent. This cam 74 is capable of engaging both of the transverse rods 54 and 56 in its reciprocable movement and first engages one, then further movement of the slide inwardly\ causes the treadle bar to turn until the other side of the cam 74 engages the other bar to index the same. This brings the tuner to a predetermined mechanical position, since the tuning means are mechanically linked to the upper end of the treadle bar assembly.

Pressure upon any of the mechanical push buttons 6 also operates clutch means to be described so that the tuner is substantially relieved of extra mechanical load during the mechanical preset. cycles. This clutch operating means consists of a pivotally mounted transverse flanged bar 78 which extends across the whole housing and beyond into an area which supports both the manual and the signal seeking tuner portion of the apparatus. This flanged bar 78 may pivot about its longitudinal axis and is spring biased toward its uppermost position by a spring 80 one end of which is anchored to the frame side 24 and the other to a flanged tip 82 on the transverse bar 78. Extending downwardly from the flanged bar 78 at 70 discreet intervals are a series of operating fingers 84 which are curved and extend into the proximity of operating plugs 86 on the rear face of each of the push buttons 6. Thus, when any of the push buttons are depressed, the plug 86 associated therewith presses against the curved surface of one of the fingers 84 causing the flanged bar 78 to rotate about its axis. This motion will actuate clutch operating means to be described. Thus far the equipment described in detail is capable of quickly bringing the tuning apparatus to a predetermined mechanical setting upon the inward pressure on any one of the push buttons. The adjustable cam means 74 on any one slide may, of course, be reset to any other desired position by pulling outwardly on the associated push buttons 6 which. unlocks the cam. Then by manually tuning the apparatus to a desired stationthe treadle bar will be moved to a given position associated with such station. When the push button is then pushed in all the way, the cam 74 will first be adjusted to a given position and then locked in that position. Thereafter, when that push button 6 is depressed, the new station will be tuned in as fully described in Schwarz et al. 2,489,544.

It has been mentioned that initial depression of any I is spring-biased to the right as shown in Figure 4 by a coil spring 90 which'encircles the shaft 62 and bears against a disc 94 which" in turn presses against the side frame member 26. The opposite end of the spring 90 engages the end of the sleeve 64 to force it toward the right. An integral enlarged ring 96 is supported on the inner end of the sleeve-64 to act as a shoulder for the clutch operat ing means forcing the sleeve to the left against the bias 'of spring 90. A clutch operating lever 98 has one end hooked through an opening in a flanged bracket 100 extending from the side of the frame member 26. The lever 98 has a central opening therein through which the sleeve 64 projects and each side part of the lever on opposite sides of the-sleeve 64 has raised projections 102 which engage the side of the enlarged integral ring 96. 'Thus, when the innermost end of the lever 98 is forced to the left as shown in Fig. 4, these projections 102 press against the side oftherin'g 96 forcing the sleeve 64to the left and compressing spring 90. This disengages the clutch means to be described.

Lever 98 is moved about its pivot in bracket 100 through engagement with a curved flanged arm 104 on the rotatable transverse bar 78 which engages a roller 106 r on the innermost end of the pivoted arm 98. As the bar 78 rotates about its axis against the bias of spring 80 this curved flange 104 forces the end of the lever 98 to the left as viewed in Fig. 4. Mounted on the outside of sleeve 64, but rigidly connected thereto is a gear 108. Mounted adjacent to gear 108 and free' on sleeve 64 is a second gear 110 connectedto rotate with the first gear by springs 112 in order to absorb gear back-lash, thus rotation of the gear assembly 108-110 will drive the sleeve 64.

Mounted on the right-hand end of the sleeve 64 is a first clutch plate 114. This clutch plate is adapted to engage a second spaced clutch plate 116 rigidly secured to the end of shaft 62 and which is rotatably supported on a ball bearing 118 sunk in the cupped end of a stub shaft 120 threaded through the frame wall. A layer of friction material122 is provided between the clutch faces and secured to either one to provide for friction driving.

The manual drive and the signal seeking drive for the tuner are both provided through the gear 108 which drives sleeve 64 and clutch plate 1.14 then through clutch plate 116 to drive the shaft 62. A manually operable knob 124 is secured 011 the end of a rotatable shaft 126 which'projects from the front of the tuner. This shaft has mounted-thereon two externally threaded sections 128 and 130 which are secured together and v 64 to turn the shaft 62 through engagement of the the fully cocked position.

In order not to overload the solenoid or to require an inordinately large solenoid, the apparatus is so arranged that only one of, these parts at a time will be moved and that they will be moved in sequence. When the apparatus has moved to a point where the driving spring 202 has become discharged and should be recocked, suitable switching means will be closed to energize the solenoid 220 and it will draw in its armature 222 to r tate arm 208 and reload spring 202. This movement, however, does not move arm 238 to move the tuner to the low frequency end of the band. The solenoid is deenergized and spring 232 returns the slide link 224 to the withdrawn position. If at this time the tuner requires movement to the other end of the band, the solenoid will again be energized to draw in its core 222 and this time the arm 238 will be coupled to the link 224 and the tuner will be moved. However, since the automatic drive spring has, already been cocked, its load will not be applied and only the force necessary to move the tuner is required. The system, therefore, applies two strokes, one to load spring 202 and the second to move the tuner if necessary. If the tuner is at some position other than at the high frequency end, the coupling will not be made and the solenoid will not be energized. Initial movement of the slide away from its position of rest actuates the clutch operating bar 78 through engagement of flanged operator 133 extending from the side of slide 224 which engages a curved foot 135 of the rotatable bar 78. Thus, the clutch is open whenever. the slide moves.

This action may be generally explained by reference to the simple circuit diagram shown in Figure 9. In that instance a source of power 240 is shown connected to the solenoid coil 220 and also to ground. The solenoid coil is in turn connected through a normally closed switch 242 and thence through two parallel connected switches 244 and 246 to ground. The switches 242, 244 and 246 are mounted on the frame adjacent the various pivoted lever arms 208, 228, 230 and 238 (see Fig. 8) and are adapted to be operated by the movement of the link slide 224 and pivoted levers 238 and 208. The switch 242, as previously mentioned, is normally closed, and is only opened when the solenoid fully retracts its core within the coil to load whatever apparatus is operatively connected thereto. On the other hand, switches 244 and 246 are normally open switches, which are closed when either the driving spring 202 becomes discharged and needs recocking or the tuner assembly reaches the high frequency end of the band and must be moved to the low frequency end respectively.

Assuming for the moment that the spring 202 .becomes unloaded and has moved the assembly 128-130 as far as it can to drive the tuner, then the adjustable limit screw 248 engages the switch operating arm 250 for the switch 246, which is mounted on an insulating panel 253 on the wall of the frame to close the same. Since the switch 242 is already closed, an obvious energizing circuit through switches 242 and 244 in series is completed for the coil 220 and it draws its core 222 inwardly, pulling the arm 228 toward it as shown in Figure 7. Arm 228 is integrally connected to arm 230 across behind pivoted lever 208 so that such movement of arm 228 not only moves integral arm 230 counterclockwise about shaft 210 as viewed in Figure 7, but at the same time carties with it arm 208, since that is nested between the two parts although physically unconnected. As soon as core 222 has been withdrawn completely within the solenoid 220, the position of the link 224 opens switch 242 by movement of car 255 to deenergize the solenoid, and link 224 may be withdrawn toward the right as shown in Figure 7 by spring 232. Arm 208 will be retained in its extreme left position since plug 214 rests in annular slot 218 of the assembly 128130 which has moved to One-way ratchet drive 162-158 permits this movement but the gear train is locked for return movement under control of detent 198.

The unitary assembly of arms 228 and 230, however,

will be drawn back clockwise about shaft 210.

If at the time arms 228 and 230 are moved back, switch 242 assumes its normally closed position, a secondcircuit will becompleted for the solenoid coil 220 and that will be again energized. On its second stroke, however, no motion will be imparted to arm 208 since that has already assumed its fully cocked position, but on this stroke the plate 238 will be picked up and drawn in a counterclockwise direction around 210 as seen in Figure 7, which movement will turn clutch disc '116 through link 134 to move the tuner to the low frequency end of the band, and thus reset the tuner. The means for causing this second stroke and a setting of the tuner are best shown in Figure 7 and consist of a pivoted toothed pawl 252 mounted on the top corner of arm 230. This pawl is spring biased downwardly by a biasing spring 254, one end of which engages the arm 230 and the other the pawl 252. This end of the arm 230 oscillates under a flange 256 on the upper edge of pivoted arm 238. In general, the flange is solid, but it contains an opening 258 best shown in Figure 6, into which the tooth 260 of the toothed pawl 252 may project to lock the lever arms 230 and 238 together for unitary motion under certain circumstances. The locked position of the tooth' 260 is shown in dash and dotted outline in Figure 7.

Assuming that the solenoid has completed its first stroke and moved the arm 208'to its completely cocked position, which is shown in dash and dotted outline in Figure 7, upon a return of the linkage 224 to its remote right-hand position under the influence of spring 232, the arm 230 is moved back to its original position. 'As it moves, a second tooth 262 on the bottom of pawl 252 rides up on the cam spring 216 to force the pawl 252 clockwise about its 'pivot. When the pawl reaches a point adjacent the opening projects through this opening and is held there by the end of the cam spring 216. Upon completion of the second circuit through switch 246, the solenoid 220 is.

again energized and link 224 is drawn to the left, as shown in Figure 7. This movement of arms 228230 now picks up arm 238 and through the linkage 134 moves the tuning means to the low frequency end. Again, switch 242 opens as soon as the core 222 is drawn into the solenoid and the solenoid circuit is broken. Upon the second return stroke, however, both switches 244 and -If the tuner reaches the high frequency end of its travel. and the driving spring 202 has not completed its circuit through switch 244 to call for solenoid energization, the closure of switch 246 itself will complete a circuit for energizing the solenoid 220. This energization will again first pick up pivoted arm 208 to reload the driving spring 202 regardless of its intermediate position and move it to a completely loaded state. The solenoid will then become deenergized by the opening of switch 242 which is mechanically operated and the linkage 224 will return to its right-hand position to again close it. However, movement of the arm 208 has not opened switch 246 which still remains closed and the operation for moving arm 238 to move the tuning means per so will be repeated.

Thus, if the driving spring becomes unloaded to close its switch 244 only, a single stroke of the solenoid will sufiice,

but if both switches are closed or switch 246 only, the solenoid will take two strokes to first load 'the spring 258 in the flange 256, it

9 202 and then 'move'thetu'ning means toits lowfrequency end of travel.

lteferringnow'specifically to Figure 3, a momentarily closedenergizing switch 270is mounted on topofthe frame of the tuner and provided with a manually'engageableloperating bar' member 20: This switch'is connected electrically in'serieswith the control relay 194as shown iiith'e" patent above referred to circuitwise so that the relay is energized when thisswitch is closed to inaugurate a signal seeking tuning cycle. When the operator depresses button 20 and relay 19'4 becomes energized, it 1iftsdetent-198out of engagement with the teeth 180-of the gear train load and governor. The spring 202 then turnsthe lever'208 abouttheshaft- 210 and in so doing the plugj214 on said lever moves the threaded drive assembly 128 -130 toward the front of the tuner. This motion, through the rack 130; drives the gear train with its associated governor at a regulated speed. At the same time theforward threaded portion 128 engages the gear 8;-'=110'to drive the same as a rack. Rotation of gear 10'8110 drives theclutch member 114, and through the clutch, the tuning means. When the tuner tunes a station, the control relay 194 is deene'rgized and it drops detent 198 into engagement with the governor teeth 180' to immediately lock the threaded means 128 1 30 against further movement and index the tuner on station. When the threaded assembly 128-130 is moved quickly in the opposite direction to load the spring 202, the one-way drive clutch in the gear train at 162, 158 permits the major portion of the gear train to remain stationary while the threaded assembly is moved to its cocked position.

If the operator desires at any time to utilize the preset push buttons 6, he merely depresses the one desired. The first inward movement of the push button causes the clutch operating transverse shaft 78 to be rotated, which in turn pivotallynioves the operating lever 98 to compress spring 90am open the clutch, immediately disconnecting both the manual and the signal seeking portion from the tuniiig means. Further action of the slide brings a preset adjustable mechanical cam 74 into engagement with the tippdsite treadle bar arms 54 and 56 to index the tuner. Lastly, if the operator desires to manually move the tuner to any position, he may do so merely by rotating the knob 124. This knob drives the shaft 126 upon which the threaded assembly 128130 is mounted to rotate that assembly. However, since the rear threaded portion 130 has threads of no pitch, the threaded assembly may rotate without tending to move the pinion 154 of the gear train, which is locked by detent 198. At the same time this rotation causes the worm portion 128 to drive the gear 108 110 and through the clutch to move the tuner to any desired position. With this design, therefore, manual, preset mechanical, or signal seeking tuning ac- :tion is obtainable, and the device is simplified in that only a single small solenoid is utilized to either reload the power source for signal tuning or move the tuning means to one limit of its motion.

We claim:

1. -In radio receiving apparatus, movable means for tuning the .apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, a first driving means directly connected to said movable means, a plurality of presettable adjustable means individually operatively engageable with said first driving means to move the driving means to certain desired positions, a second driving means, clutch means interconnecting said first and second driving means, manually movable and power operated means connected to the second driving means to move the same and energizable means selectively connectible to the power operated means and to the movable means for tuning to sequentially charge the power operated means and move the movable means to one end of its travel.

2. In radio receiving apparatus, movable means for tuning the apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, atfirst drivingmeans. directlysconnected to .said movable means, a plurality of presettable adjustable means individually operatively engageable with. said first driving means to move thedriving-meansitocertain desired positions, a second drivingmeans, clutch. meansiuterconnectingsaid first and second driving means, power storage means connected to the second; driving means to move the same and a singleenergizable-means; selectively operatively connected to. said power. storage. means; and said movable means to sequentially charge the, power sroragemeans and: move the: movable means: to one ex tremrty oftravel: I

3. In radio receiving apparatus, movable means to tuning the. apparatus over a; predete m n d a of fif quencies, a firstdrivingvmeans; directly connected to said movable means, a plurality; of presettable adjustable means individually operatively. engageable with said first driyingt means to. move thedriving means to certain desired positions, a second driving means, clutch means interconnecting said. firstand second driving means, power storage means: connected, to the, second driving means. to. moveuthe same, a single energizable means selectively operatively connectedto said power storage means and said movable means to sequentially charge the power storage means and move the movable means to one extremity of travel, and switching means controlled by thepositions of the. power. storage means, the movable means and the energizable means and connected to the latter to control the energizationthereofb 4. In radio receiving apparatus, movable tuning means for tuning the apparatus over a band, of frequencies, a

first driving means connected to said movable tuning nected to the movable tuning means and the power storage means to sequentially move the same.

5. In radio receiving apparatus, movable tuning means for tuning the apparatus over a band of frequencies, a first driving means connected to said. movable tuning means,a second driving means, clutch means interconnecting said first and second driving means, power storage means connected to said second driving means to move the same, energizable means selectively connected to the movable tuning means and the power storage means to sequentially move the same, and a plurality of switching means connected in circuit with the energizable means to control the same, said switching means being actuated by the positions of the power storage means, the movable tuning means and the energizable means.

6. In radio receiving apparatus, movable means for tuning said apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, driving means connected to saidmov-able means to move the same, a plurality of reciprocable members operably engageable with said driving means to move the same, power driven reciprocable means connected to said driving means, energizable means connected to said power driven reciprocable means and said movable means for tuning the receiver and control switching means connected to the energizable means to periodically energize the energizable means to alternately move the power driven reciprocable means and the movable means for tuning the apparatus.

7. In radio receiving apparatus, movable means for tuning said apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, driving means connected to said movable means to move the same, a plurality of reciprocable members operably engageable with said driving means to move the same, a second driving means, clutch means connecting said first and second driving means, reciprocable power driven means connected to said second driving means, and energizable means connected to said reciprocable power driven means and said first driving means to move each sequentially to one extreme position of travel. a V

8. In radio receiving apparatus, movable means for tuning said apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, driving means connected to said movable means to move the same, a plurality of reciprocable members operably engageable with said driving means to move the same, a second driving means, clutch means connecting said first and second driving means,,reciprocable power driven means connected to said second driving means, energizable. means connected'to said reciprocable power driven means and said first driving means to move each sequentially to. one extreme position of travel, and a plurality of switching means operable by the positions of the movable means for tuning the apparatus, the reciprocable power driven means and the energizable means respectively, said switching, means being connected to the energizable means and controlling its operable cycles.

9. In radio receiving apparatus, movable tuning means for tuning the apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, power storage means, clutch means interconnecting said power storage means and the movable tuning means, energizable means connected to both the power storage means and to the movable tuning means to independently move the same to one extremity of travel, interrelated switching means connected to the power storage means, the movable tuning means and the energizable means and operated by the positions of these parts, said switching means being connected in circuit with the energizable means to control the same.

10. In radio receiving apparatus, movable tuning means for tuning the apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, a first rotatable means connected to the movable tuning means to' move the same, a second rotatable means, clutch means interconnecting the first and second rotatable means, gear means mounted on said second rotatable means, rotatable and reciprocable threaded means engaging said gear means and driving the same through either rotation or reciprocation of the threaded means.

11. In radio receiving apparatus, movable tuning means for tuning the apparatus over a predetermined band of frequencies, a first rotatable means connected to the movable tuning means .to move the same, a second rotatable means, clutch means interconnecting the first and second rotatable means, gear means mounted on said second rotatable means, rotatable and reciprocable threaded means engaging said gear means and driving the same through either rotation or reciprocation of the threaded means, power means connected to the rotatable and reciprocable threaded means to drive the same and speed limiting means connected to the rotatable and reciprocable threaded means to govern the speed of movement.

12. In power apparatus, a solenoid, a corefor said solenoid, a driving link connected to said vcore and reciprocated by movement of said core, a multi arm pivoted lever connected to the driving through. a lost-motion connection, a plurality of pivoted arms engageable by said first lever and movable by rotation of the lever, one of said plurality of arms beingoperat'ively connected to a first load and the other arm operatively connected to a second load and disengageable means carried by the multi arm lever to engage one of the arms and cause it to move so that the solenoid may cause movement of either of the plurality of arms selectively. q

13. In radio apparatus, movable tuning means for tuning the apparatus over a band of frequencies, a first driving means connected to said movable tuning means, a second driving means, clutch means interconnecting said first and second driving means, power storage means connected to said second driving means to move the same, energizable means, reciprocable means connected to the energizable means and moved thereby, a multi arm pivoted lever connected to the reciprocable :means, a plurality of pivoted arms engageable by said first pivoted lever and movable thereby, one of said arms being connected to the first driving means and the other. arm a being connected to the power storage means so that movement of the reciprocable means will move the arms to move the first driving means and the power storage,

means.

14. In radio apparatus, movable tuning means for tuning the apparatus over a band of frequencies, a first driving means connected to said movable tuning means, a second driving means, clutch means interconnecting said first and second driving means, power storage means connected to said second driving means to move the same, energizable means, reciprocable means connected to the energizable means and moved thereby a multi arm pivoted lever connected to the reciprocable means, a

plurality of pivoted arms engageable by said first pivoted lever and movable thereby, one of said arms being I connected to the first driving means and the other arm being connected to the power storage means so that move- -ment-of the reciprocable means will move the arms to move the first driving means and the power storage means, and selective coupling means between said one arm and l the first pivoted lever so that said one arm is moved only under certain conditions.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS r Spencer Apr. 19, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493741 *Nov 1, 1946Jan 10, 1950Andrews Edward FStop-on-signal radio apparatus
US2595745 *Mar 19, 1949May 6, 1952Teletype CorpPrinting telegraph selector
US2612555 *Oct 17, 1951Sep 30, 1952Gray Res And Dev Company IncTelegraph selector mechanism
US2651397 *Jun 18, 1948Sep 8, 1953Rca CorpAutomatic selective and sequential tuner
US2706787 *Jul 30, 1949Apr 19, 1955Rca CorpSignal seeking tuning systems
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2933927 *Sep 11, 1958Apr 26, 1960Motorola IncSlide tuner
US3037390 *Sep 30, 1959Jun 5, 1962Gen Motors CorpSingle solenoid signal tuned receiver
US3177729 *Apr 26, 1962Apr 13, 1965Motourola IncTuning system
US3854342 *Dec 12, 1973Dec 17, 1974Philco Ford CorpRadio tuning apparatus
US4141254 *May 11, 1977Feb 27, 1979U.S. Philips CorporationPushbutton reselection tuner with pivoting lever
US4511869 *Feb 15, 1983Apr 16, 1985Imperial Clevite Inc.Radio circuit tuned by adjustably deforming an inductance coil
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Classifications
U.S. Classification334/19, 334/23, 74/10.27, 334/21, 477/209
International ClassificationH03J5/00, H03J5/12
Cooperative ClassificationH03J5/12
European ClassificationH03J5/12