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Publication numberUS2857651 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1958
Filing dateApr 3, 1956
Priority dateApr 3, 1956
Publication numberUS 2857651 A, US 2857651A, US-A-2857651, US2857651 A, US2857651A
InventorsKeen William Rollin
Original AssigneeCollins & Aikman Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Curled yarns, curled yarn fabrics and method for making same
US 2857651 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 28, 1958 w. R. KEEN 2,857,651

d CURLED YARNS, CURLED YARN FABRICS AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME Filed April 3, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet l A TTORNE YS.

Oct. 28,1958 W R, KEEN 2,857,651 CURLED YARNS, CURLEDv YARN FABRICS AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME Filed April s, 195e 2 sheets-sheer. 2

Turf/NG @I ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent O CURLED YARNS, CURLnn YARN FABRICS AND MErHoD FoR MAKING SAME William Rollin Keen, Media, Pa., assignor to Collins & Aikman Corporation, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Application April 3, 1956, Serial No. 575,754 17 Claims. (Cl. v28-72) This invention relates to a method of manufacturing curled or crimped textile yarns, curled yarn fabrics, to the apparatus for 'making them, and to the curled yarns produced thereby. The curled yarns of the present invention may be made from fibers or laments of materials which will take a substantially permanent set such as mohair, wool, nylon, dacron and the like or mixtures thereof with viscose or lthe like.

It has been known to produce curled or crimped yarns for use in textile materials. However, the known methods are both tedious and costly and 'often produce serious deterioration in the strength and elasticity of the yarns produced so that they are diliicult and costly to use in weaving or Vother fabric forming processes.

It is -an object of this invention to provide a method of crimping or curling textile yarns without injuring the yarn material.

Itis also an object of this invention to provide a rapid and inexpensive method for continuously producing curled textile yarns.

It ,is Va further object of the present invention to provide a continuous process for crimping `or curling yarns without exert-'ing undue strain on the yarn material.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a process and apparatus for producing fabrics having curled or crimped yarns.

`It is a further object fof .the present invention tor provide a process and apparatus for continuously producing a number of curled yarn ends and simultaneously Weaving or tufting a fabric using said ends.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a novel crimped or curled textile yarn.

One embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the attached drawings of which:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a backing material tufted with a yarn which it is desired to curl or crimp in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the tufted yarn of Fig. 1 removed from the backing material;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the crimped yarn of Fig. 2 employed as a pile yarn in a woven cut pile fabric; and

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic drawing showing another embodiment of the invention wherein a pile yarn is tufted in a backing material, `set in the backing, removed and then retufted in the backing material and showing the apparatus employed;

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic drawing showing another embodiment of the invention wherein an endless loop of backing material is continuously tufted and the tufted yarn is set and spooled; and

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic perspective view showing another embodiment of the invention wherein an endless loop =of backing material is continuously tufted, and the tufted yarn is set and beamed to a loom.

The yarn 10 which it is desired to curl or crimp is tufted in the usual manner in a backing material 11 as 2,857,651 Patented Oct. 28, 1958 shown in Fig. l. The backing material may be of any of the usual open weave materials such as burlap. The yarns itl may be of any normal construction as to count or twist in the single or ply and may be spun entirely of wool, mohair, nylon, dacron or any settable fiber or lilaments of nylon or any settable filament or combinations thereof. The yarn '10 is tufted in the backing 11 and, as thus deformed, is subjected to the treatment necessary to provide a set in the yarn 10. The type of crimp or curl produced in the yarn may be varied by modifying types of loops and stretch used during the tufting. The setting is `performed lon the tufted fabric in accordance with known methods required to produce a set in the yarn material such as by the application of hot water -or steam. lf preferred, the tufted yarn may be dyed while in this condition vand thereby obtain `both setting and dyeing at the same time. The yarn V,is then pulled from the backing as may be easily done with a tufted yarn, and is fully prepared to be used as za pile yarn in a tufted or woven fabric. A fully crimped -and set -yarn 12 is shown in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3 shows the crimped yarn 12 woven as the pile yarn in a pile Yfabric 13. As shown in Fig. 3, the pile -is Vcut allowing the yarns 12 to twist or -turn in accordance with their set conformations to form a dense, tight, `pile surface.

A continuous process for making crimped yal-nis shown in Fig. 5. Backing material 30, which lmay `be in the form .of a continuous loop, is continuously fed into a tuftingmachine 31 where itis tufted With yarn 32.

The tufted backing material 30 .is then lcontinuously fed' into a setting chamber 33 Where Ythe Itufted yarn 32 isv set inthe looped or crimped condition. As `the backing material 30 leaves the setting chamber 33, the crimpedy yarn 32 is continuously raveled from the `back-ing and is wound about the .cone 34. f

'Where the yarn is to be used to produce a tufted fabric, the Yyarn may be tufted back into :the very backing material in which it was set as illustrated in Fig. 4..

tufted configurations in the tufted fabric 20 are set by any usual treatment. The pile yarn 23 is then pulled from the fabric 20 and fed to the needles of tufting machine 24, while at the same time the backing material 4of the fabric 2@ is fed beneath the tufting machine 24, so that the crimped yarn 23 is tufted back into the fabric 20. The retufted fabric 25 is then taken up on roll 26.

The present invention also includes the process shown in Fig. 6 in which a woven fabric is continuously produced from crimped yarn, A continuous loop of backing material 4.9 is fed to tufting machine 41 and setting chamber 42. The yarn 43 is tufted into the .backing material 40 and then set in the tufted condition in setting chamber 42 and is unraveled and beamed directly to the loom 44 where it becomes the warp yarns in the woven fabric 45.

An important advantage of the invention is that it accomplishes the crimping and curling of yarns in a form where they can be set or dyed and set evenly on conventional dyeing equipment and in a minimum time. Thus, as shown in Fig. 4, all of the equipment is that normally used in handling and producing piece goods. The handling of individual yarns is limited to the tufting machine which is, of course, a standard goods making machine.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

l. A method of producing crimped yarns comprising the steps of needle-tufting textile yarns in a backing material to form a tufted pile fabric, subjecting the resulting pile fabric to setting treatment to set the loops in the tufted yarns and removing the set yarns from the backing material.

2. The textile yarn made according to the process of claim 1.

3. A method of producing crimped yarns comprising the steps of needle-tufting textile yarns of a settable material in a woven backing material, continuously subjecting the tufted pile fabric so formed to heat treatment to set the loops in the pile yarns and then pulling out the tufted yarns as permanently crimped individual yarns.

4. The textile yarn made according to the process of claim 3.

5. A method of forming crimped yarns comprising the steps of tuftng textile yarns in a woven backing material to form a tufted pile fabric, subjecting said tufted pile fabric to moist heat treatment, drying the fabric and then raveling the pile yarns and collecting them as individually crimped yarns.

6. The textile yarn made according to the process of claim 5.

7. A method of producing a tufted pile fabric comprising the steps of tufting pile yarns in a backing material, setting the pile yarns in situ in said backing material, removing the set pile yarns and retufting them into the backing material.

8. The fabric made according to the process of claim 7.

9. A method of making a tufted pile fabric comprising the steps of needle-tufting a textile yarn warp-wise in a woven backing material, continuously subjecting the tufted pile fabric so formed to a pile yarn setting treatment in a warp-wise direction, removing the set pile yarns from the backing material and continuously needletufting said yarns into a backing material.

10. The fabric made according to the process of claim 9.

11. A method of continuously producing crimped yarns from a closed loop of backing material comprising continuously needle tufting a textile yarn in the backing material and then continuously setting the tufted back- 4 ing material to form a permanent crimp in the tufted yarn and then raveling the set crimped yarns and collecting them by winding about a cone.

l2. A method of continuously making a fabric with crimped yarns comprising continuously tufting pile yarns in a backing material, setting the yarns so tufted in the backing material and then continuously delivering the tufted and set yarns to a loom as warp yarns.

13. The fabric made according to the process of claim 12.

i4. A method of forming a tufted pile fabric comprising tufting pile-forming yarns in a backing material, setting the tufted yarns, removing the tufted and set yarns from the backing material and tufting said pile forming yarns in a backing material.

l5. The fabric made in accordance with the method of claim 14.

16. A method of making pile fabrics comprising tufting pile-forming yarns in a backing material, setting the tufted yarns, removing the tufted and set yarns from the backing material and weaving said yarns as the pile yarns in a woven pile fabric.

17. The fabric made in accordance with the method of claim 16.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,051,588 Wilson Aug. 18, 1936 2,394,165 Getaz Feb. 5, 1946 2,430,425 Jackson Nov. 4, 1947 2,509,349 Jackson May 30, 1950 2,509,351 Reinhardt et al May 30, 1950 2,523,690 Finkelsteinas Sept. 26, 1950 2,557,452 Miller June 19, 1951 2,575,008 Dorgin Nov. 13, 1951 2,601,451 Page June 24, 1952 2,620,545 Hathaway et al Dec. 9, 1952 2,662,560 Jackson Dec. 15, 1953 2,796,654 Ashcroft June 25, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 396,219 Great Britain Aug. 3, 1933 kan.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2051588 *Oct 10, 1935Aug 18, 1936Wilson William TProcess of curling animal fiber yarn
US2394165 *Apr 23, 1943Feb 5, 1946Louis Getaz JamesProcessing of synthetic fibers
US2430425 *Dec 15, 1945Nov 4, 1947Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co IncProcess of making pile fabric floor covering
US2509349 *Oct 9, 1946May 30, 1950Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co IncProcess for making pile fabric with permanently set hard twist wool pile yarn
US2509351 *Nov 7, 1946May 30, 1950Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co IncProcess of producing axminster pile fabric
US2523690 *Dec 10, 1946Sep 26, 1950Jokubas FinkelsteinasChenille looping machine for the manufacture of artificial furs
US2557452 *Feb 18, 1949Jun 19, 1951Alexander Smith & Sons CarpertAxminster fabric
US2575008 *Mar 16, 1949Nov 13, 1951Abraham L DorginMethod of creping nylon
US2601451 *Sep 22, 1948Jun 24, 1952Scott & Williams IncStocking and method of making the same
US2620545 *Nov 14, 1950Dec 9, 1952Shawmut Eng CoMachine for trimming the tuft yarns of tube frames
US2662560 *Jun 22, 1950Dec 15, 1953Alexander Smith IncPile fabric
US2796654 *Oct 27, 1954Jun 25, 1957Mohasco Ind IncPile fabric and method of making same
GB396219A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3001264 *May 11, 1959Sep 26, 1961Bloch GodfreyPile fabric
US3034194 *Nov 4, 1957May 15, 1962Callaway Mills CoMethod for producing a tufted fabric having a deep fleecelike surface and the resulting product
US3152381 *May 9, 1962Oct 13, 1964Callaway Mills CoMethod for producing fabric
US3466718 *Jun 16, 1967Sep 16, 1969Adamson Thomas EMethods for producing textured fabric material
US3774412 *Jan 14, 1971Nov 27, 1973Uniroyal IncJet tuft rib knitted fabric
US4045848 *Sep 17, 1976Sep 6, 1977Fred Whitaker CompanyMethod of producing a warp of intermittently colored yarns
US4109592 *Nov 29, 1976Aug 29, 1978West Point-Pepperell, Inc.Mending yarn in the selvedge of tufted carpeting
US4761864 *Dec 15, 1983Aug 9, 1988Elastic-Berger OhgParallel thread supply system
US6321427 *Sep 9, 1999Nov 27, 2001Polyloom Corporation Of AmericaKnit-deknit yarn and method and apparatus for making same
WO1996017984A1 *Dec 5, 1995Jun 13, 1996Huyck Licensco IncMultilayer forming fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/92, 139/391, 19/66.00R, 28/172.1, 28/218, 28/247, 28/166, 28/159
International ClassificationD03D27/00, D02G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D2700/60, D03D27/00, D02G1/002
European ClassificationD03D27/00, D02G1/00B