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Publication numberUS2858059 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1958
Filing dateNov 12, 1957
Priority dateDec 28, 1953
Publication numberUS 2858059 A, US 2858059A, US-A-2858059, US2858059 A, US2858059A
InventorsThorne C Kitchell
Original AssigneeUnion Bag Camp Paper Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Produce container
US 2858059 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 28, 1958 T. c. KlTCHELL PRODUCE CONTAINER 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Original Filed Dec. 28, 1953 3& +8

4 3 D m Q5 4 n J 1 n k o H n O O u ow u 7 m ML Q3 o om w n PIIIIIP a" M r4 Mi 1%] INVENTOR THORNECA/ITCHELL ATTO R N EY Oct. 28, 1958 c, n-cQ 2,858,059

PRODUCE CONTAINER Original Filed Dec. 28, 1953 3 Sheets -Sheet 2 INVENTOR 7710/2: C/(nc/mu.

ATTORNEY Oct. 28, 1958 T. C. KITCHELL PRODUCE CONTAINER 3 Sh Sh at 3 Original Filed D60. 28, 1953 INVENTOR THOR 5 CI Al TCHEL L A T TORNEX United States Patent Ofiice 2,858,059 Patented Oct. 28, 1958 PRODUCE. CONTAINER Thorne C. Kitchell, Savannah, Ga., assignor toUnion Bag-Camp Paper Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Virginia Original application December 28, 1953, Serial No. 400,469. u Divided and this application November 12, 1957, Serial No. 695,764

4 Claims. (Cl. 229-45) The present invention relates to improvements in packing. and shipping containers. More particularly it pertains to an improved container adapted for packing and shipping fresh fruits and vegetables such as tangerines, apples, peaches, cucumbers and the like.

The present application is a division of my copending application Serial No. 400,469, filed December 28, 1953, entitled Produce Container, and now abanboned. The container described and claimed in my copending application, Serial No. 474,339, filed December 10, 1954, is a modification of the container described and claimed in the present application.

In packing and shipping fresh fruits and vegetables, which are highly perishable, it is necessary to provide containers which are strong enough to adequately protect the contents of the container from compression, crushing and damage, which will permit suflicient ventilation throughout the load when such containers are stacked in a shipping vehicle, which will allow for bulge packing so that the fruits and vegetables can be packed higher than the walls of the container and still settle after vibration encountered in transportation, and which can be easily opened and again closed.

It is an object of the invention to provide a container having double wall thickness on all vertical faces which gives it exceptional strength when subjected to load pressures.

Another object of the invention is to provide a container with wedge cuts in the cover to permit bulge packing.

Another object of the invention is to provide a container with a cover having its ends of suflicient thickness to act as a spacer between containers. Furthermore the center of each end of the cover is so cut back that it creates an opening or duct between butted containers which acts as a ventilating channel between stacked layers of boxes.

Another object of the invention is to provide a container which not only permits sufficient ventilation throughout a load but eliminates the necessity of wooden spacers between boxes, which spacers are costly, require extra labor and cause delays in loading. This is most important since freight regulations make it mandatory to provide proper spacing, blocking and bracing to maintain ventilation channels for shipping certain commodities of the type herein referred to. Heretofore this has been taken care of by inserting wooden material between boxes. The present invention obviates this completely because it has three thicknesses at the ends of the box for proper spacing between adjacent boxes, has an opening between such thicknesses for vertical ventilation between stacked boxes, and has longitudinal channels built in the container for horizontal ventilation.

It is still another object of the invention to provide a container with a novel locking arrangement for holding the cover onto the container, which arrangement secures the cover to the container quickly and without fastening means or special tools. This locking means consists of a locking tongue on the cover so shaped that it easily slips between the two panels of the end walls and engages the locking tabs on the outside panel. The edges of such tongue butt or slip in behind the locking tabs so that the cover can only rise a limited amount. This is especially important for bulge packing where fruits or vegetables are packed higher than the walls of the container but settle after the vibration encountered in transportation. Except for such limited movement of the cover, it is held in place so that it cannot come off the container. Nevertheless, it is possible by the application of pressure against such locking tabs to easily remove the cover.

Another object of this invention is to provide a container of the character stated, which is simple in design, rugged in construction, economical to manufacture, and can be shipped and stored in unassembled form in flat condition. but can be easily and quickly set up.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The. invention. accordingly comprises an article of manufacture possessing the features, properties and the relation of elements. which will be exemplified in the article hereinafter described and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the claims.

Fora fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the follow ing detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a view of the blank for the body of the container;

Figure 2 is a view of the blank for the cover of the container;

Figure 3 is an end elevation of the container;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the cover of the con tainer;

Figure 5 is a. perspective view of the body of the container prior to folding in the various panels;

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 6-6 of Figure 3, with the folded triple thickness of the cover omitted to simplify the view;

Figure 7 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 7-7 of Figure 3;

Figure 8 is a sectional View taken substantially along the line 8--8 of Figure 3;

Figure 9 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 99 of Figure 6;

Figure 10 is a perspective view of a portion of the end of a shipping. vehicle with containers of the present invention stacked in position;

Figure 11 is an end elevation, corresponding to a portion of the view of Figure 3, showing a modified locking tab.

Figure 12 is a view of a portion of a blank, correspond ing to a portion. of the blank of Figure 1 but modified to produce a rectangular ventilating channel; and

Figure 13 is a sectional view, corresponding to a portion of the view of Figure 9, showing the modified channel formed from the blank of Figure ll.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, there is shown in Figures 1 and 2 blanks from which the body and cover of the container are formed. Each is of onepieee construction substantially rectangular in shape and may be made of corrugated boardor other suitable fibrous folding board. They are suitably cut. and scored or. creased along certain lines to facilitate formation of the container of the present invention, and are supplied to the customer in fiat condition.

The blank. 10 for the body has been scored to define rectangular outer side panels 11 and 12 and outer end panels 13 and 14, said panels being flexibly connected together along score lines 15, 16 and. 17. A narrow attaching, flap 18 is flexibly connected along score line.

19 to the panel 14, so that the ends of the blank can be joined together to form a tube. The bottom of the container is formed by bottom flaps 20, 21, 22 and 23 flexibly connected to the panels 11, 12, 13' and 14, respectively, along the score line 24. Similarly inner side panels and 26 and inner end panels 27 and 28 are flexibly connected to the panels 11, 12, 13 and 14, respectively, along the score line 29. a a Each of outer end panels 13 and 14 is die cut to provide a hand hole 30, channel ventilating openings 31, an opening 32 for entry of stitching equipment and a locking tongue opening 33. The locking tongue opening is so shaped as to cooperate with the locking tongue on the cover, as will be explained hereinafter. Each of the inner end panels 27 and 28 is die cut to provide a hand hole 34 which hand hole in the inner panel is so positioned that it will coincide with the hand hole in the interconnected panel when the containeris assembled. Each of the end panels 27 and 28 has its outer edges cut out at and 36, which cut outs likewise coincide with the openings 31 and 32 when the container is assembled. The inner side panels 25 and 26 are provided with ventilating holes 37 and channel flaps 38 flexibly connected to the panels along score lines 39.

The body of the container is assembled by bending the blank 10 along the score lines 15, 16, 17 and 19 into the form of a rectangular tube and securing the attaching flap 18 to the panel 14 by staples or other fastening means, as shown in Figure 5. The container manufacturer usually supplies the stapled tube in flat condition to the customer, along with any other flat sheets making up the container. The customer then performs the other operations of assembling the body and cover. The bottom flaps 20, 21, 22 and 23 of the body blank are thereafter folded inwardly along the score line 24 and stitched in place with staples. The opening 32, permits the entry of the anvil where hand stitching is employed. Then the inner end panels 27 and 28 are folded inwardly along the score line 29 and laid against the inside surface of the outer end panels 13 and 14 respectively. Thus there will be formed end walls of double thickness in which the various openings and cut outs 34, 35 and 36 coincide with the openings 30, 31, and 32, respectively, as is shown in, Figure 6. Similarly the inner side panels 25 and 26 are folded inwardly along the score line 29 and at the same time thechannel flaps 38 are folded inwardly along the score line 39 so that such flaps lie against the bottom of the container and the edges thereof butt against the inside surface of the outer side panels 11 and 12. As will be seen from Figure 9, the inner side panels 25 and 26 are thus spaced at the bottom of the container from the outer side panels 11 and 12, respectively, thus creating side Walls of double thickness having triangular channels therein with ventilating openings 31 at both ends of each channel. These openings, channels and the holes in the inner side panels provide ventilation along the sides of the container directly into the inside of the container, as shown at C in Figure 10.

The cover blank 41, shown in Figure 2, has been scored to define a rectangular central panel 42. Extending outwardly from the centers of the ends of the panel are T-shaped locking tongues 43 flexibly connected thereto along score lines 44, which score lines are set back a short distance from the ends of the panel, for a reason to be hereinafter explained. At each side of the tongues 43 and also extending outwardly from the ends of the panels are rectangular outer end flaps 45 flexibly connected to the panel along score lines 46. Rectangular inner end flaps 47 are flexibly connected to the flaps 45 along score lines 48. Such flaps 47 are provided with locking tabs 49, which when the ends of the cover are folded in place will slip into slots 50 cut in the panel 42 to securely lock such ends in place, as shown in Figure 7. Extending outwardly from the sides of the panel 42 are rectangular side strips or flanges 51, flexibly connected to the panel along score lines 52. At each end of these strips 51 are end flaps 53 flexibly connected thereto along score lines 54. In addition each strip 51 is provided with a V-shaped or wedge cut 55 located approximately in the center of the strip. The panel 42 also has ventilating holes 56 cut or punched in each corner.

The cover blank 41 may be easily assembled into the form shown in Figure 4 by turning the side strips or flanges 51 downwardly at right angles to the panel 42 and turning the end flaps 53 around the end and at right angles to the strips 51. Then the outer end flaps 45 are turned downwardly against the outer faces of the flaps 53 while the inner end flaps 47 are folded completely around and against the inner faces of the flaps 53. Thus the flaps 53 are located and held in position between the outer and inner end flaps 45 and 47 (see Figures 7 and 8). These various flaps are then securely held in their respective positions by inserting the tabs 49 into the slots 50. This results in a cover having portions of its ends of triple thickness (see Figures 4, 7 and 8), which acts as a spacer for ventilation between containers when they are loaded adjacent to each other,

' as shown at A in Figure 10. Furthermore, the central areas of the ends of the cover between such triple thickness portions are cut back a short distance so that there is in etfect a duct or chimney between adjacent containers when they are loaded. Such ducts between rows of containers allow vertical ventilation between stacked layers, as shown at B in Figure 10. r

The cover can be locked to the body of the container by inserting the locking tongue 43 at each end of the cover between the inner and outer panels forming the end wall of the container. It will be seen from Figure 3 that the cut out 33 in the outer end panel conforms generally to the shape of the tongue 43 and that the back ends 43a of the tongue either butt against the tabs 57 resulting from the cut outs 33 or slide under such tabs (see Figures 7 and 8). In either case it securely locks the cover to the body. It should be further noted that there is sufiicient play between the tongue and corre sponding cut out so that the cover can rise a small distance and still be locked to the body. This, along with the wedge cuts in the cover, permits bulge packing without danger of the cover coming off. Normally, in PQCk'. ing fruits and vegetables they are piled higher than the walls of the container and the cover is then forced down on the body. In the container of the present invention the locking arrangement permits the cover to be locked in place even though the cover is raised above the walls of the container. If more upward pressure is created by the packed commodities, the wedge cuts permit the center of the cover to bulge upwardly without breaking. Later, as the commodities settle during shipment, the cover assumes its normal position on the body. In any case the cover is prevented from being forced off the body of the container. Neverthless the cover may be easily removed by applying pressure against the tabs 57, thereby permitting the back-ends of the tongue to be released from the tabs and raised upwardly. In this connection the location of the ventilating holes 56 is important since they permit a person to grip the cover while applying pressure to the tabs. Although the tongues and cut outs are shown generally as T-shaped, it will be understood that they may take different shapes whichwill provide for shoulders or stops on the tongue which can butt against or slide under tabson the body of the container. Figure ll shows one modified form of locking arrangement, in which the cut out in the outer end panel 13 is rectangular instead of T-shaped. This results in a single strip 57a extending above the cut out, the ends of which strip butt against the back ends 43a on the tongue 43, thereby locking the cover to the body. The ends of the strip 57a in effect act in the same manner as the tabs 57. As in the other form of locking arrangement the cover may be easily removed by applying pressure against the ends of the strip 57a.

To provide a flat base in the bottom of the container and protect the commodities from the staples in the bottom flaps a sheet 58 is inserted in the bottom of the body after it has been assembled. Such sheet also serves to hold the side and end panels in position.

It is possible to form a container of similar construction but with side walls having rectangular channels instead of the triangular channels heretofore described. I, such case it is necessary to change the shapes of the inner side panels and inner end panels, as shown in Figure 12. Between the inner and outer side panels have been added channels flaps 38a flexibly connected thereto along score lines 39a. In addition channel tabs 59 are flexibly connected to the inner side panels along score lines 60. These serve to keep the inner and outer panels of the assembled container properly spaced so that the inner panels will not collapse and close off the ventilating channels when commodities are packed in the container. Although not shown in the container having triangular channels, it will be understood that such tabs can also be employed in that construction where necessary. Further referring to Figure 12, it will be noted that the side edges of the inner end panels are straight to conform to the straight side of the inner side panels when folded in place.

The body of the container is assembled in the same manner as the blank of Figure 1, except that the flaps 38a and the tabs 59 must also be turned inwardly. This results in rectangular ventilating channels as shown in Figure 13. In other respects the two forms of the container of the present invention are the same.

Thus it will be apparent that the herein disclosed invention provides a new and useful container which is particularly adapted for the packing and shipment of fresh fruits and vegetables, which embodies the features heretofore set forth and which particularly furnishes ventilation throughout a load without the extra spacers required with earlier containers. This will be evident from Figure 10, which shows that the construction of this container affords positive ventilation channels and openings throughout the load, both between rows and layers of containers. These channels and openings allow proper ventilation to each and every container in the load.

Since certain changes may be made in the above article, and different embodiments of the invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description (or shown in the accompanying drawings) shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A shipping container of corrugated board comprising a bottom, side and end walls, a detachable cover adapted to be placed over the walls, and locking means for securing the cover to said end walls, which end walls have integral inner and outer panels in face to face relationship hinged together at the upper edge of the wall, said locking means comprising an inverted T-shaped cut out in the said outer panel, locking tabs on each side of the vertical portion of the cut out, and a tongue projecting from the edge of the cover overlying the said out out and substantially normal to the plane of the cover when the cover is placed over the walls, said tongue comprising a vertical member and shoulders projecting laterally from the member and spaced from the said edge of the cover, the width of the horizontal portion of the cut out being greater than the thickness of said tongue,

the width of the said member being less than the width of the vertical portion of the cut out, the horizontal dimension of the member and shoulders being less than the length of the horizontal portion of the cut out and the vertical extent of said tongue from said edge of the cover being greater than the vertical distance between the top edge of said wall and the bottom of said cut out whereby said cut out is adapted to receive the tongue for insertion between the inner and outer panels with the shoulders engaging the tabs for locking the cover to the wall, said outer panel and the tabs are spaced from the inner panel to permit insertion and removal of the tongue in a substantially vertical plane and to allow said tongue to slide up and down against the inner plane while the shoulders are locked behind the tabs, thereby permitting the cover to be raised above the walls without unlocking, said tabs being depressible to permit unlocking of the cover by disengagement of the shoulders from the tabs without edge to edge engagement of the shoulders and tabs, said tabs being freely exposed with the tongue in locked position and thereby capable of being readily depressed.

2. The container of claim 1 in which the tongue is centrally positioned at each end of the cover and the cover ends on each side of said tongue are of multiple thickness to provide a set back central area.

3. The container of claim 1 in which the cover has side flanges with a wedge cut in each to permit bulge packing of the container.

4. A shipping container of corrugated board comprising a bottom, side and end walls, a detachable cover adapted to be placed over the walls, and locking means for securing the cover to two opposite walls, which opposite walls have integral inner and outer panels in face to face relationship hinged together at the upper edge of the wall, said locking means comprising an inverted T- shaped cut out in the said outer panel, locking tabs on each side of the vertical portion of the cut out, and a tongue projecting from the edge of the cover overlying the said cut out and substantially normal to the plane of the cover when the cover is placed over the walls, said tongue comprising a vertical member and shoulders projecting laterally from the member and spaced from the said edge of the cover, the width of the horizontal portion of the cut out being greater than the thickness of said tongue, the width of the said member being less than the width of the vertical portion of the cut out, the horizontal dimension of the member and shoulders being less than the length of the horizontal portion of the cut out and the vertical extent of said tongue from said edge of the cover being greater than the vertical distance between the top edge of said wall and the bottom of said cut out whereby said cut out is adapted to receive the tongue for insertion between the inner and outer panels with the shoulders engaging the tabs for locking the cover to the wall, said outer panel and the tabs are spaced from the inner panel to permit insertion and removal of the tongue in a substantially vertical plane and to allow said tongue to slide up and down against the inner panel while the shoulders are locked behind the tabs, thereby permitting the cover to be raised above the walls without unlocking, said tabs being depressible to permit unlocking of the cover by disengagement of the shoulders from the tabs without edge to edge engagement of the shoulders and tabs, said tabs being freely exposed with the tongue in locked position and thereby capable of being readily depressed.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,341,429 Lewis May 25, 1920 2,340,753 Inman Feb. 1, 1944 2,619,276 Gibbons Nov. 25, 1952 2,690,286 Dawson Sept. 28, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1341429 *Mar 22, 1916May 25, 1920Lewis Charles WCollapsible box
US2340753 *Nov 23, 1940Feb 1, 1944Bloomer Bros CoNonrefillable box
US2619276 *Mar 6, 1950Nov 25, 1952Gaylord Container CorpContainer
US2690286 *Dec 19, 1950Sep 28, 1954Waterbury Corrugated ContainerFastening means for fiberboard and corrugated cartons
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2997222 *Jul 30, 1959Aug 22, 1961Color Process Company IncDisplay unit
US3240374 *Jan 13, 1964Mar 15, 1966Stapling Machines CoWirebound box cover
US3286714 *Apr 30, 1962Nov 22, 1966Bankers Box CompanyContainer for records
US3357631 *Dec 3, 1963Dec 12, 1967Continental Can CoRecessed ice-cream carton with tuck-in reclosure
US3369728 *Nov 23, 1965Feb 20, 1968Continental Can CoVentilated fruit or vegetable container
US4350281 *Oct 9, 1980Sep 21, 1982The Procter & Gamble CompanyOne-piece shipping container with cut-case protection
US4923113 *Jun 7, 1988May 8, 1990Iberoamer Icana Del Ambalaje S.A.Container with a perfected lid
US5316210 *May 14, 1993May 31, 1994Georgia-Pacific CorporationPaperboard storage container
US5547081 *Oct 25, 1993Aug 20, 1996Chiquita Brands, Inc.Unitized, stable stacking system with tier sheet stabilizer, and method
US6354487Apr 9, 2001Mar 12, 2002Weyerhaeuser CompanyStackable covered tray
US7637416 *Sep 28, 2004Dec 29, 2009Capespan (Pty) LtdAir flow channel
US8596519 *Dec 6, 2010Dec 3, 2013International Paper CompanyFrame face display and shipping container
US20110068156 *Nov 15, 2010Mar 24, 2011Scacchiera S.R.L.Box-Shaped Container for Hot Foods
US20110248079 *Nov 16, 2009Oct 13, 2011Corcel Ip Limitedstackable carton with ventilation channels
US20120080426 *Dec 6, 2010Apr 5, 2012International Paper CompanyFrame face display and shipping container
DE1222849B *Sep 9, 1963Aug 11, 1966Hans Harry LolkKasten
EP1291284A1 *Sep 7, 2001Mar 12, 2003Corrugated Synergies International, LLCVentilated stackable folded box
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/125.28, 229/120, 229/916, 229/168, 229/172, 229/117.6
International ClassificationB65D5/42, B65D5/68
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/916, B65D5/4295, B65D5/685
European ClassificationB65D5/42V, B65D5/68B