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Publication numberUS2858265 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1958
Filing dateOct 21, 1955
Priority dateOct 21, 1955
Publication numberUS 2858265 A, US 2858265A, US-A-2858265, US2858265 A, US2858265A
InventorsStefan Schneider Max
Original AssigneeStefan Schneider Max
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plating rack
US 2858265 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 28 1958 M. s. SCVHNEIDER 2,858,265

PLATING RACK Filed Oct. 21, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

Oct. 28, 1958 M. s. SCHNEIDER 2,858,265

PLATING RACK Filed Oct. 21, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 r 2,858,265 lcfi Patented on. as, 1958 PLATENG RACK Max Stefan Schneider, Chicago, lll.

Application Uctober 21, W55, Serial No. 541,3tt7

2 fillaims. (Cl. 2tl4-297) The present invention relates to improvements in plating racks or the'like, and more particularly, pertains to a plating rack, possessing great flexibility, which may be readily assembled and disassembled by the user thereof to efiiciently support a plurality of articles varying in size and shape.

It is well known by those familiar with the plating art that the rack components are generally welded or bolted together to conform with the configuration of the par ticular articles to be plated. However, the rack thus formed is subsequently unsuitable for articles of different size due to the permanence of assembly and necessity for drilling additional holes, or additional welding or other assembly operations.

The present invention recognizes the need for flexibility in rack constructions and has as an object, therefore, the

provision of a plating rack which may readily be constructed to conform with the size and configuration of ,the article to be plated.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a plating rack construction which eliminates any permanent-type attachments between the components thereof and thus eliminates welding, drilling, tapping and other similar operations.

It is another object of this invention to provide a plating rack construction which may be readily assembled and disassembled so as to efficiently form plating rack adapted to handle a plurality of objects of varying size.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a plating rack construction which may be slightly adjusted after assembly to allow for any tolerances in the rack components or article to be plated, thereby assuring a rack tailored to the exact configuration of the articles to be plated.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide novel means for clamping both auxiliary bus bars and article hanger means to the main bus bars.

It is another object of this invention to provide a number of novel hanger constructions whereby articles of varying size and configuration may be efiiciently sup ported and plated.

The above and other objects will become more apparent from the following description, accompanying drawings and appended claims.

In one embodiment of this invention, a main bus bar is provided having at least one transversely disposed auxiliary bus bar detachably affixed thereto by means of a frictionally engaging clamp member. A plurality of suitable article hanger members are detachably afiixed to to the transversely disposed auxiliary bus bars by means of other frictionally engaging clamp members. It is apparent that relative adjusting movement between the bus bars and the article hangers is readily effected because of the detachable clamping members, and thus a tailor-made rack is arrived at to properly support and position the article to be plated in a plating bath. In an optional embodiment it may be desirable to clamp an article hanger directly to the main bus bar.

For a more complete understanding of this invention reference should now be had to the drawings, wherein Figure l is a fragmentary perspective View of an auxiliary bus bar maintained in fixed relationship relative to a main bus bar by means of frictional clamping means, and a plurality of hanger members mounted on the auxiliary bus bar by means of a second type of frictionally engaging clamp member;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating a plurality of auxiliary bus bars maintained in fixed relationship with a main bus bar in which the lowermost auxiliary bus bar is formed in two pieces which cooperate to frictionally engage the main bus bar;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view illustrating two main bus bars maintained in fixed, spaced-apart relationship by means of a plurality of auxiliary bus bars which are clamped to the main bus bars by means of frictionally engaging clamping members;

Fig. 4 is aperspective view of one type of frictionally engaging clamp;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a two-piece auxiliary bus bar having offset end portions which function as frictionally engaging clamping means;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary perspective view of a plurality of article hanger members secured to a bus bar by means of a frictionally engaging clamp;

Pig. 7 is a fragmentary front elevational view of one type of clamping member which is utilized with an auxiliary bus bar member which is offset at the point of contact with the main bus bar member;

Pig. 8 is a side elevational view of the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary front elevational view of a plurality of article hanger members which are directly secured to a main or auxiliary bus bar member by means of a split frictionally engaging clamp member.

Fig. 11 is a side elevational view of the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is a sectional view taken on line 12-12 of Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary front elevational view of one type of article hanger member which secures itself to a split auxiliary bus bar member and simultaneously secures the auxiliary split bus bar member to a main bus bar;

Fig. 14 is a side elevational view of the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 13; and

Fig. 15 is a sectional view taken on line lit-l5 of Fig. 14. I

Referring now to the drawings and, more particularly, to Fig. l, a main bus bar member is illustrated which is appropriately formed at its upper end portion 21 so as to securely engage an electrically conducting member. It is intended in the normal course of plating operation that the bus bar 2% be ne atively charged so as to become the cathode in a plating bath solution. The positively charged metal ions in the solution, in the course of the plating operation, are attracted by the opposite negative charge of the work articles in electrical communication with the bus bar ill and are drawn thereto, whereupon they plate out.

Transversely affixed to the main bus bar is an auxiliary bus bar 22 which is' immovably but detachably positioned thereon by means of a two-piece split clamp member 24. It will be noted from Fig. 4 that the clamp 24 comprises two twin half members 24a having abutting flange portions 26 which are suitably apertured at 28, whereby a bolt member 3t such as illustrated in Fig. 1 may threadedly cooperate with a nut member 32 and with a washer member 34 in maintaining the two twin clamp halves 24a in tight, frictional engagement with both the main bus bar 20 and the auxiliary bus bar 22.

The advantages of such a clamping assembly are readily obvious. Heretofore it had been common practice to drill or tap both the auxiliary and the main bus bar members to allow bolting or riveting of the two members together in fixed permanent relationship. However, once the bus bar members were so assembled, the disposition of the bars relative to each other could not be changed to more efliciently conform with the size or shape of other articles which were to be plated which varied in size or configuration. The bus bar members which are permanently arranged in accordance with the common practice in the plating art are of limited use being suitable only for those articles for which originally formed. The plating racks of the prior art obviously do not possess the flexibility which the racks herein presented display.

Referring once again to Fig. 1, it will be noted that a plurality of article hanger members 36 having hooklike end portions 3% are pivotally mounted on a twopiece clamp member id by means of a nut and bolt assembly 41% which simultaneously secures the hanger member 36 to the clamp members 40 and also frictionally secures the two identical halves 40a of the clamp members 40 to the auxiliary bus bar 22. It will be noted from Fig. 1 that each corner of each clamp half 4% is bent so as to form a triangular projecting portion disposed oppositely to its mating half. These triangular projections 44 prevent rotational movement of the article hanger members 36; the article hanger members 36 may either straddle a projection 44 or be interposed between two adjacent projections 44. In either instance fixed positioning of the article hanger members 36 is assured. Each of the legs 46 of the article hanger members is composed of a suitable electrically conducting material such a copper, bronze, etc., as are the remaining clamp components and bus bar members. In addition, each of the leg members 46 of the article hanger members 36 is flexible and possessed of a certain amount of resiliency whereby the leg members 46. may be drawn toward each other. Thus, an article to be plated may be held between hooklike end limits 38, as a result of the tension induced in the legs 46 which tends to once again separate the legs enabling them to revert to their original position.

In order to prevent needless loss of the plating-out ion and needless embrittlement of the plating rack construction, the conducting parts of the rack, which carry the current to the articles to be plated, but which themselves do not contact the work article or the current supplying conduit, are covered with a protective layer of some plastic material, such as various forms of vinyl resins, polyethylene or similar nonconducting and noncorrodible substances. Consequently, only that minimum surface area of the article hanger need be exposed which assures efficient electrical contact with the article which is to be plated. Deleterious metal build up and waste of the plating solution on the remaining portions of the plating rack construction are thus avoided.

It is obvious from Fig. 1 that the relative positioning of the article hanger members and the auxiliary and main bus bar members may be efficiently carried out and effected by mere movement ofthe frictionally engaging clamp members 40 and 24. The clamping rack construction illustrated possesses great strength and may be slightly adjusted to conform with the individual article being plated in a matter of seconds. Should an article of dissimilar size and contour be plated, the same rack components may be utilized by mere rearrangement of the relative positions of the rack components illustrated. In each instance where the rack is to be rearranged, the protective covering for the rack components not contacting the work articles to be plated may be readily stripped therefrom.

In Fig. 2 the flexibility of the plating rack assembly provided is made apparent by the provision of a plurality of auxiliary bus bar members 22 which are secured to the upper portion of the bus bar 20 by means of the frictionally engaging clamp members 24. In addition, a third auxiliary two-piece bus bar member 48 which is illustrated and clearly shown in Fig. 5 is frictionally engaged to the lower portion of the main bus bar 20. As is clearly shown in Fig. 5, one end portion of each bar 48 is formed so as to define a channel-like portion 50 which is adapted to encompass one half the peripheral surface of the bus bar 20 with which it is to be utilized. Apertures 52 are drilled or tapped at those portions adjacent the channel-like portion 50. The two end portions of the auxiliary bus bars 48 may then be frictionally engaged to bus bar 20 and mutually abut by means of bolt members 53 (or an equivalent nut and bolt assembly, in those instances in which the apertures 52 are not tapped) which draw the opposite bar halves 48 into tight abutting relationship with themselves and with the interposed bus bar 2t). A plurality of article hanger members 36 may be secured to each of the auxiliary bus bars 22 or 48 in accordance with the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 1.

In Fig. 3 a bus bar arrangement is illustrated in which two main bus bars 20 are maintained in fixed, spacedapart relationship by means of two auxiliary bus bars 22 secured at either end portion to each of the bus bars 20 by means of the clamp members 24 illustrated in Fig. 4 and also by means of an auxiliary bus bar means 54 aifixed to the lower end portion of each bus bar 20. The auxiliary bus bar 54 has a U-shaped or offset channel-like portion 56 positioned at either end portion thereof. These U-shaped offset portions 56 encircle one half the periphery of each bus bar 20, and a U- shaped clamp member 53 encircles the remaining half.

The U-shaped members 48 are drilled or tapped at their two flange portions adjacent the central channel-like portion, as are the end portions of the auxiliary bus bar 54. Consequently, a bolt and nut assembly or bolt members may secure the ofiset auxiliary bus bar and the U- shaped clamp members 58 in tight-abutting relationship with each other and with the interposed portions or" the bus bars 20. It will be noted that the construction illustrated in Fig. 3 possesses great strength and is adapted to securely hold articles of great weight and size. It is thu apparent that the same basic components of the rack construction illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3 may hold articles of minute size which may be positioned on the hooklike end limits of the article hangers 36 in Fig. 1 or articles of great size which may be secured to the aligned transverse auxiliary bus bar members 22 and 54' illustrated in Fig. 3.

In Fig. 6 a two-piece clamp member 60 is illustrated upon which are pivotally mounted a plurality of discrete article hanger members 62 having hooklike end limits 64 from which small members which are to be plated may securely depend. The split clamp 60 frictionally engages the main bus bar 20 by means of the nut and bolt assembly 66.

Figs. 7 through 9 disclose a modified clamping member 68 composed of two twin half members 68a which are slotted at each end portion at 70 whereby an auxiliary bar or strap member 72, which is oflfset at 74 (see Fig. 9) at the point of the auxiliary bar engagement with the main bus bar 20, may be engaged. The illustrated rack assembly is easily effected by merely slipping each half 68a over opposed arms of the auxiliary bar 72 and clamping the apertured flange portions 76 of the clamp member 68 into tight, mutual-abutting relationship by means of the nut and bolt assembly 78. In the course of clamping the flange portions 76 together, the twin halves 68a compress the offset portion 74 of the auxiliary bar 72 tightly against the main bus bar member 20 in frictional nonmoving relationship. One edge 71 of slot 70 may have toothlike projections formed thereon to facilitate engagement with the auxiliary bus bar 72 as illustrated in Fig. 8.

In Figs. through 12, a clamp arrangement similar to that illustrated in Figs. 7 through 9 is illustrated, except that twin half portions 30a of the clamp 80 illustrated, are centrally slotted at 83 to enable a plurality of flexible hanger wires 88 to be inserted in and assembled thereto. Flange portions 84 of the illustrated clamp 80 are encircled and confined by a two-piece band 85, the halves of which are compressed by the nut and bolt assembly 81. Instead of a unitary bar 72, such as is illustrated in Figs. 7 through 9, the plurality of discrete hanger wires 88 which are flexible in nature are offset at 87 at the point of contact with the main bus bar 20 (see Figs. 11 and 12) and in parallel relationship at that point only. After passing through either slotted end portion of the twin halves 80a of the clamp member, the wires 88 diverge and flare out to either hold an article to be plated at their end limits by means of hooklike end limits, or hold articles to be plated by means of self-induced tension effected by forcing the end portions of two adjacent wire members 88 together.

In Figs. 13 through 15, an article hanger mount 82 is illustrated which has formed integral therewith a threaded end portion 84 which threadedly engages one member 86a which in conjunction with an opposed oflset strap member 86 forms an auxiliary bus bar member transversely disposed to a main bus bar 20. The strap 86a abuts against the opposed strap 86, thereby frictionally engaging the interposed bus bar member 20. Also afiixed to a pivot head 91 of the article hanger mount 82 are the hangers 89 which may be notched at their end limits at 90 to better secure or hold an article to be plated. It is thus seen that the article mount 82 in the course of securing itself to the twin auxiliary strap halves 86 and 86a concomitantly frictionally secures the latter strap halves to the main bus bar member 20.

It is thus seen that a plurality of clamping means has been provided which is readily adjustable to conform with the shape, size and configuration of many articles which are to be plated. Each position of the apparatus illustrated, although stable and secure, is of a nonpermanent nature. Article hanger members may be secured either to auxiliary or main bus bars with ready facility. The illustrated rack components may be readily disassembled, and conduct plating current with the efficiency that racks of permanent nature provide. The rack constructions illustrated enable any person unskilled in the art of rack fabrication to readily erect a rack which will efliciently hold and allow to be plated any article of his own choosing. It has been made obvious from the apparatus illustrated that relative positioning of the bus bar members and the article hangers may be rapidly carried out by a mere loosening and tightening of a nut and bolt or equivalent locking assembly. The illustrated racks require no special tools for assembly or disassembly and are composed of parts which are readily procurable and of low unit cost. It has been made apparent from the illustrated views that many frictionally engaging clamps may be provided of varying design for efiiciently securing either an article hanger member or an auxiliary bus bar to a main bus bar member. In view of the many modifications which may be made to the illustrated apparatus and which still remain within the inventive concept herein provided, it is intended that the provided invention be limited only by the scope of the claims hereinafter to follow.

I claim:

1. A rack for use in an electroplating bath comprising a main bus bar, an auxiliary bus bar, detachable clamping means maintaining said main and said auxiliary bus bars in fixed transverse relationship, said clamping means having two twin half members, each of said half members having an end bracket-like portion engaging an aligned portion of said auxiliary bus bar, each of said halves also having a surface area offset from said bracketlike portion disposed parallel thereto and abutting against one surface of said main bus bar, said twin half members also having projecting flange portions substantially normally projecting from said offset surface areas, said projecting flange portions being in mutually abutting relationship, and means for compressing said projecting flange portions together whereby said main bus bar is frictionally secured in immovable relationship to said clamp halves offset surface areas and to the portion of said auxiliary bus bar straddled by said clamping means bracket-like end portions, said clamping means and said auxiliary bus bar encompassing an entire peripheral portion of said main bus bar.

2. A rack for use in an electroplating bath comprising a main bus bar, an auxiliary bus bar, detachable clamping means maintaining said main and said auxiliary bus bars in fixed transverse relationship, said clamping means having two twin half members, each of said half members having an end bracket-like portion engaging an aligned portion of said auxiliary bus bar, each of said halves also having a surface area offset from. said bracketlike portion disposed parallel thereto and abutting against one surface of said main busbar, each of said clamping means half members having an interconnecting portion between said bracket-like end portion and said offset surface area portion for maintaining said bracket-like end portion and offset surface area portion in spaced relation, the interval between said latter portions being substantially equal to the thickness of the main bus bar, said twin half members also having projecting flange portions substantially normally projecting from said offset surface areas, said projecting flange portions being in mutually abutting relationship, and means for compressing said projecting flange portions together whereby said main bus bar is frictionally secured in immovable relationship to said clamp halves offset surface areas and to the portion of said auxiliary bus bar straddled by said clamping means bracket-like end portions, said clamping means and said auxiliary bus bar encompassing an entire peripheral portion of said main bus bar.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 538,848 Sobey May 7, 1895 1,129,241 Smith Feb. 23, 1915 2,072,170 Herzog Mar. 2, 1937 2,082,366 Thompson June 1, 1937 2,258,391 Novitsky (Oct. 7, 1941 2,562,683 Schneider July 31, 1951 2,604,340 Hobbs July 22, 1952 2,652,359 Schneider Sept. 15, 1953 2,734,859 Reilly et a1. Feb. 14, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US538848 *Oct 22, 1894May 7, 1895The JWilliam sobey
US1129241 *Jul 20, 1914Feb 23, 1915David C Cook Publishing CompanyElectroplating apparatus.
US2072170 *Nov 20, 1934Mar 2, 1937United Chromium IncElements for use in the electrodeposition of chromium
US2082366 *Aug 8, 1934Jun 1, 1937Torvald ThompsonClamp
US2258391 *Mar 7, 1939Oct 7, 1941Joseph NovitskyPlating rack
US2562683 *Jun 8, 1949Jul 31, 1951Stefan Schneider MaxArticle support for electroplating racks
US2604340 *Jun 12, 1947Jul 22, 1952Acrow Eng LtdClamp for scaffolding tubes and like members
US2652359 *Feb 1, 1951Sep 15, 1953Stefan Schneider MaxSupporting means used in connection with electroplating racks
US2734859 *Sep 26, 1952Feb 14, 1956 Plating rack
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2954222 *Oct 14, 1959Sep 27, 1960Syracuse Heat Treating CorpWork supporting fixture
US2957590 *Apr 4, 1958Oct 25, 1960Armiger Harry LConveyor carriers
US3033776 *Sep 21, 1959May 8, 1962Rosner Ernest BAnodizing rack
US3326389 *Jul 22, 1965Jun 20, 1967Lockheed Aircraft CorpRack
US3357913 *Apr 2, 1965Dec 12, 1967Pilot Company IncElectroplating rack
US3864238 *Mar 30, 1973Feb 4, 1975Nash MelvinMeans for Electropolishing Denture Frames
US4037727 *Jan 2, 1976Jul 26, 1977Pierce America, Inc.Adjustable painting or plating rack
US5147050 *Jun 27, 1991Sep 15, 1992Surface Sciences, Inc.Custom hanging rack with interchangeable support hooks and method therefor
US5485932 *May 3, 1994Jan 23, 1996Digital Equipment CorporationWall mountable modular component mounting system
US5524774 *Jul 28, 1994Jun 11, 1996Mighty Hook, Inc.Hanging rack with cantilevered support hooks
US5908120 *Jan 29, 1997Jun 1, 1999Yates; Donnie MitchellFor supporting an article from a conveyor system
US6439404 *Jul 27, 1999Aug 27, 2002Nicolas SteegMultipurpose support
Classifications
U.S. Classification204/297.9, 403/393, 403/119, 211/182, 403/388, 403/400
International ClassificationC25D17/08, C25D17/06
Cooperative ClassificationC25D17/08
European ClassificationC25D17/08