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Publication numberUS2858992 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1958
Filing dateMar 4, 1955
Priority dateMar 4, 1955
Publication numberUS 2858992 A, US 2858992A, US-A-2858992, US2858992 A, US2858992A
InventorsEdward A Wentz
Original AssigneeSpecialties Dev Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Winding machine
US 2858992 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. A. WENTZ WINDING MACHINE Nov. 4, 1958 7 Sheets-Shet ,1

Filed March 4, 1955 INVENTOR. Z'dwzdA. M922 f2 wz E. A. WENTZ WINDING MACHINE Nov. 4, 1958 Filed March 4, 1955 '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. 'Ea WardA. Film/z ATTORNEY E. A. WENTZ WINDING MACHINE Nov. 4, 195s '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 4, 1955 INVENTOR. BY l'dWa z'dA. hzzfz Arrow E. A. IWENTZ WINDING MACHINE Nov. 4, 1958 '7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 4, 1955 INVENTOR. Edward A. Plezz/z' ATTORNEY fizzy 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 E. A. WENTZ WINDING MACHINE Nov. 4, 1958 Filed March 4, 1955 I INVENTOR. Edna/11A. %z2/z ATTORNEY Nov. 4, 1958 E. A. WENTZ WINDING MACHINE Filed March 4, 1955 1 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 HVVENTDR.

BY inward/4. hzz/z WINDING MACHINE Edward A. Wentz, Montclair, N. J., assignor to Specialties Development Corporation, Belleville, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application March 4, 1955, Serial No. 492,124 14 Claims. (Cl. 242-7) The present invention relates to winding machines, and, more particularly, to a machine for winding yarn or the like on objects having a generally oval cylindrical shape.

The present invention is primarily concerned with the manufacture of receptacles, commonly known as cylinders, for storing fluid media under pressure which receptacles comprise a hollow shell having a winding of resin impregnated yarn applied thereto, whereby, in effect,

I United States Patent receptacles having walls constructed of resin reinforced with yarn are built up. The machinein accordance with the present invention is particularly adapted for applying such windings but also can be utilized for applyingwinda ings of yarn or wire to metallic cylinders solely for the purpose of reinforcing the same or to protect them against shattering when pierced by a projectile.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to.

provide a relatively simple and practical machine for applying such windings in a rapid and economical manner. Another object is to provide such a machine which is adapted to apply a cylindrical or hoop winding and an end'over-end winding on objects having a cylindrical body and hemispherical ends.

Another object is to provide such a machine which is operable to alternately apply the two types of windings. A further object is to provide such a machine wherein the change from one type of winding to the other is effected in a rapid and convenient manner and without distrubing the object on which the winding is being applied. A still further object is to provide such a machine which is adapted for automatic, semi-automatic or manual control.

Other and further objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art 'upon employment of the invention in practice. A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description, and is shown in'the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the specification, wherein: M

Fig. 1 is a schematic View of a cylindrical shell, illustrating the path of the winding applying means while applying an end-over-end winding thereon.

Fig. 2 is a similar view illustrating a cylindrical or hoop winding being applied to the shell.

Fig. 3 is an elevational view of the upper portion of the machine as seen from one side thereof. 1

Fig. 3a is an elevational view of the lower portion of the side of the machine shown in Fig. 3, Figs. 3 and 3a when combined constituting a complete side view of the machine.

Fig. 4 is an elevational view of the upper portion of the machine as seen from the oflier side thereof.

of the machine.

2,858,992 Patented Nev. 4, 1958 APPLICATION OF THE WINDING Referring to the drawings in detail and more particularly to Figs. l and 2 thereof, there is shown a cylindrical shell C in the course of having a resin-impregnated yarn Y applied thereto. For example, the yarn may be composed of fiber glass threads which are impregnated With any suitable resin adapted to harden to a solid state. The shell C comprises a cylindrical body B, generally hemispherical ends E, and a spud S at one of the ends which provides an inlet and outlet for the receptacle being manufactured.

As shown in Fig. 1, the shell C has an oval or endover-end winding 0 applied thereto by moving the winding applying means in a continuous path approximating the outline of the shell while rotating the shell about its longitudinal axis. This path is generally oval, and has semi-circular endzones and has substantially straight or slightly curved side zones between the end zones.

The machine illustrated herein and about to be described is constructed and arranged to provide such windings.

As shown in Fig. 2, the body' B has a cylindrical or hoop winding H applied thereto by traversing the winding applying means in a substantially lineal path at oneside of the oval path shown in Fig. 1 while rotating the shell.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE MACHINE Generally described, the machine shown in Figs. 3, 3a, 4, 5, 6 and 7 comprises a frame, a drive mounted on the frame, a support for the object having the winding applied thereon, mechanism operated .by the drive for rotating the support, means for applying the winding onto the object, mechanism for moving the applying means in an oval path, mechanism for rocking or tilting the support, mechanism for progressively varying the speed of rotation of the support while being tilted, and mechanism for traversing the applying means. These components will be described in detail hereinafter.

In addition, the machine includes means operable to automatically program the operations of the machine in any desired sequence.

The frame 25 connected between the plate 17 and the posts 22.

The base and the bars have elements of the machine mounted thereon and the plates have openings through which shafts, chains and the like are adapted to pass and have bearings mounted thereon for the purposes to be described hereinafter.

The main drive supported by bearings 29, 30 and 31 respectively secured to the plates 11, 12 and 17 (Fig. 3a), and a variable speed drive mechanism 32 driven by the motor for effecting rotation of the drive shaft at a constant predetermined speed.

The main drive shaft powers the various mechanisms of the machine in the manner to be described hereinafter with particular reference to such meehanisrns,

The work support. As best shown in Figs. 3 and 5, the work 01? object support (for the shell C of the illustrative embodin ent, herein) comprises an upright spindle 34 having means at the upper end thereof for. attaching the spud S of the shell to mount the same in inverted position for rotationwith the spindle, a pair ofspaced apart hori: zontal bars 35provided with. bearings 36 for rotatably; mounting the spindle, a pair of side plates 37'for supporting the bars, a horizontal shaft 38 having its ends rotatably, supported bybearings 39 mounted on the plates 37, a'sprocket 40 anda worm gear 41 on the shaft 38, a worm wheel 42 on the spindlein driving connection with the gear 41, and means for mounting the plates 37 between the bars 25 and drive mechanism for the sprocket 40 which will be described in connection with the work support rocking or tilting mechanism.

If desired, the spindle may have a bore or passageway 33: extending therethrough, adapted for connection to a source fluid under pressure which may thereby be introduced into the shell to pressurize the same and prevent collapse thereof in the event the winding is applied under considerable tension.

The winding applying means As already indicated in. connection with the brief description ofFigjs. 1 and 2, the winding applying means are adapted to alternately provide an end-over-end winding and acylindrical'or hoop winding, and, to accomplish such purpose, the winding applying means essentially comprise yarn .guiding means, mechanism for moving the guiding means in an end-over-end or oval path and for trayersihgthe same, and yarn supply means.

Referringagainto Figs. 3 and 5, there is shown a bracket 44 exte'nding outwardly from the plate 17 and including an oblong] upright end plate 45, upper and lower horizontal shafts 4 6 and 47 each having one end supported by a bearing 48-on the plate and having the other end extendingthrough a bearing 49 on the plate 17, a pairof spaced apart sprockets 50 secured for! rotation on each of, the, shafts 46 and 47 between theplates 17 and 45, chains 51 connecting aligned upper and lower sprockets and thereby having an oval path, and a horizontal rod 52connected to each of the chains 51 for movement therewith in an ova l ..path disposed in a vertical plane and extending outwardly to about the plane in which the spindle 34 rotates for operating the yarn guiding means about to be described.

The yarn is supplied to the yarnguiding means through a horizontal tube 54 mounted for rotation and. extending through bearings 55 on the plates 12 and 17 and having an end projecting outwardly through the, plate 45 and beyond the outer set of sprockets 50. This tube is centrally located with respect to the path of the. chains 51.

A-ring member 56 .is mounted on the projecting end of the tube 54 for rotation therewith and is formed with a centrally and outwardly offset portion or extension 57 having a bore for slideably receiving a rod 58. One end of this rod is secured to therod 52 and the other end extends through and is movable with respect to the portion 57.

In order to guide the yarn suppliedthrough the tubev for winding onto the shell, a roller 59 i is. mounted on.

the extension 57 facingthe tube opening, a roller 60 is mounted on the free end of the rod 58, a roller 61 is mounted adjacent the fixed ,end of the rod 58, and

a roller 62 is mounted at the outer end of the rod 52.

As viewed in Figs. 3 and 4,.the yarn leaves the-tube 4. 54, passes over the roller 59, under the roller 60 and over rollers 61 and 62, and is laid on the shell endmverend as the shell rotates.

With this arrangement, the roller 62 moves in an oval path in close proximity to the shell which path generally approximates the outline of the shell, that is the longitudinal sectional shape thereof.

The chains 51, in passing from one sprocket 50 to another, may move in a lineal direction, that is, vertically as shown. However, this zone of the chain path maybe bowed outwardly slightly by idlers 64 mounted on rods 65fixed to the plates 17 and 45 midway between the sprockets 50 and extending outwardly beyond the plate 45.

If desired, a protective plate 66 having a central opening 6'1" for the ring member extension 57 may be mounted between the path of the rod 58 and the outer sprockets 50 by securing the same to the outer ends of the rods 65.

The winding applying means drive he drivefor the winding applying means includes gear change means for effecting rotation of the chain operating sprockets 50at a high speed and a low speed, and gear change means for effecting rotation of these sprockets in either direction.

As shown in Figs. 3, 3a, 4 and 5, the speed change drive comprises a conventional solenoid controlled duplex.

chain 81 connecting the input shaft thereof to the main 7 drive shaft 27, and an output-shaft 82 rotatable ata high orlow speed dependingon which input drive is in operative connection therewith, journalled for rotation.

in: bearings 83' on the plates 12 and 17.

The direction change drive is driven by the speed change drive, and comprises a conventionalsolenoid controlled clutch 84 having an input drive 85 driven from a shaft 86journalled for rotation between bearings 87 on the plates 12 and 17 through sprockets 88 and 89: and a chain 90 and a sprocket 91 on the shaft 86.

connected to a sprocket 92 on the output shaft 82, by a chain 93 and having a second input drive 94 driven from a shaft 95 journalled for rotation between bearings 96 on the plates 12 and 17 through sprockets 97 and 98 and a chain 99 andgears 100 and 101 on the shafts 86 and 95 whereby these shafts rotate in opposite directions, and an output shaft herein shown as the upper winding applying means drive shaft 46 which extends through the clutch 84 to a bearing 102 on the plate 12 and which is operable in either direction depending upon which input drive is in operative connection therewith.

The purpose of this drive will be understood more fully from the description of the control circuit including the drive therefore and the operation of the machine.

The work support tilting means Aspreviously-indicated, the work support assembly is mounted in a manner to rock or tilt the same while an endeover-endis applied to the shell, whereby the angle at which such winding is applied'is varied with respect to the axisof rotation of the shell.

This is accomplished by providing a trunnion or bearing-arrangement at each side of the work support assembly, for example, bearings of the self aligning type knownas a fI-Ieim bearing (Figs. 3, 4 and 5). Such bearings comprise a body member 104 secured to each of the plates 37 and having-a generally spherical seat 105, and an apertured ,generally spherical member 106 received by the seat.. The members 106 are each slidably mounted-on a rod 107 which extends through-the aperassesses ture thereof and is supported in fixed position by-the bar-25 at the ends thereof. Contaminationof the rods 107 is prevented to maintain theinembers'106 slide'able thereon by suitable means such as accordion pleated sleeves 108 positioned between the ends of the rod 107 and each side of the member 106. Rocking or tilting of thework support is effected by an arrangement whichcomprises a pair of parallel spaced apart members 109 pivotally suspended on a shaft 110 mounted for rotation by bearings 111 (Fig. 7) on the bar 20, a pair of spaced upper and lower horizontal rods or links 112 having their ends pivotally connected to each of the plates 37 and the members 109, and a rod 113 pivotally connected to each of the members 109 and operated by cam mechanism 114 (Figs. 3, 4 and6) to rock the members 109 as described hereinafter, whereby the links 112 rock or tilt the work support assembly. l

The upper links 112 may be formed in two sections connected by an extension joint 103 including a spring, whereby,when the work support assembly contacts a stop 23 on the frame, the work is rocked or tilted about a pivot point closer to the Work than that of the bearing body 104 and thus enabling the work to be tilted at a greater angle than otherwise possible. This arrangement is desirable for applying certain types of end-over-end windings.

The work support drive and tilting mzeans operating a I mechanism The portion of this drive more directly associated with the work support is arranged to cooperate with the tilting' means just described so that tilting of the work support does not disturb its operation.

As shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 7, this portion of the work support drive comprises a pair of spaced sprockets 115 and 116 mounted on and for rotation with a' shaft supported between the pivotally suspended members 109 at the lower ends thereof, a'chain 117 connecting the sprocket 40 of the work support assembly and the sprocket 115, a spring urged idler 118 for taking up slack in the chain 117 due to sliding movement of the work support assembly on the rods 107, a pair of spaced sprockets 119 and 120 mounted on and forrotation with the shaft 110, a chain 121 connecting the sprockets 116 and 119, and a chain 122 connecting the sprocket 120 to drive means about to be described.

Since it is desirable to rotate the shell at a high speed when applying a cylindrical or hoop winding to speed up production and it is required to rotate the shell at a predetermined low speed in order to lay the end-overend winding thereon, provision is made for driving the chain 122 at such speeds. Also, since,-under certain operating conditions, it is desirable to progressively vary the speed of rotation of the shell while driven at a low speed for end-over-end winding in relation to the angle at which the axis of rotation of the shell is tilted to its normal vertical position, provision is made for so coordinating the speed varying means and the tilting operating means through the cam mechanism 114.

This is accomplished by a conventional variable speed drive 123 having an output sprocket 124 connected to the sprocket 120 by the chain 122 and having an input sprocket. 125, and a conventional solenoid controlled duplexv clutch 126 (Fig. 3a and 6) having a high speed input drive 127 driven by a chain 128 connected to a sprocket 129 of the highspeed output shaft of a high and low speed gear box 130, driven from the main drive shaft 27 by sprockets 131 and 132 and a chain 133, and having a low input speed drive 134 driven by a chain 135 connected to a sprocket 136 of the low speed outputdrive shaft of the gear box 130. n v The cam mechanism 114 which controls speed change of the variable drive. 123 and the operation of the work support tilting rods 113, as previously mentioned, comprises a cam drum 139 having a continuous helical groove 140, a shaft 141 for mounting the cam drum for' rotation therewith journalled for rotation between bearings 142 on the plates 11 and 12, means for rotating the shaft 141 including sprockets and chains and a gear box 143 driven from the main drive shaft 27 through a clutch-brake 144 (Fig. 3a), a cam follower 145 in the cam groove and mounted on a slide 146 having the rods 113 linked thereto and being supported on a pair of rods 147 secured between the plates 11 and 12, a second cam follower 148 in the cam groove diametrically opposite the follower 145 and mounted on a slide 149 having a gear rack 150 opposite the follower 148 and being supported on a pair of rods 151 similar to the rods 147, and a speed control device for the variable drive 123 including a sprocket 152 on a control shaft 153, a chain 154 on the sprocket 152, a second sprocket 155, a chain 156 on the sprocket 155, flexible strands '157 connecting the ends of the chains 154 and 156, and a gear 158 meshing with the rack 150 and connected for rotating the sprocket to operate the control shaft 153 (Figs. 3 and 6).

The input sprocket 125 of the variable speed drive 123 is driven by a chain 160 connected to a sprocket 161 driven by the output of the clutch 126. l j The clutch-brake 144 serves to connect the cam drum 139 for rotation by the main drive shaft when in one position and serves as a brake when in its other position to prevent rotative movement 'of the cam drum due to the thrust of the rods 113 on the follower 145.

The timing mechanism In applying windings to the shell, it is desirabl'eto alternately apply one onmore winding-s of one kind and one or more windings of the other kind until suflicient windings have been applied to produce a container having a desired wall thickness. This is generally accomplished by operating the clutches 69, 84 and 126, and the clutchbrake 144 in a predetermined sequence and under the control of an electrical circuit, about to be described, which in turn is controlled by rotation counting or timing mechanism associated with the machine.

In general, such mechanism comprises a shaft 165 supported by bearings 166 between the plates 12 and 17 (Figs. 4 and 7), a sprocket 167 on the shaft 165, ,a sprocket 168 on the winding applying means drive shaft 47, a chain 169 connecting the sprockets 167 and 168 whereby the shaft 165 rotates in a predetermined relation with the shaft 47 four wheels 170, 171, 172 and 173 mounted for rotation with the shaft and each having a dog or extension 174 thereon, and four switches 175, 176, 177and 178, one for each wheel and adjacent thereto to enable the dog of its wheel to operate the same upon the completion of one revolution of the shaft 165. The switches supply impulses to conventional counters of type which open and/ or close control switches for the solenoids of the clutches as described hereinafter.

The timing mechanism further includes Wheels 179 and 180 (Figs. 3, 4 and 6) on the cam drum shaft 141 each having a dog 181 for respectively operating a switch 182 and a switch 183 (directly in back of the switch 182, as viewed in Fig. 6) which in conjunction with the other timing mechanism controls the operation of the cam.

The control circuit moving the clutch-69 into position for efiectinglow speed operation winding applying means; solenoids 209., 210 and 211 connected across the conductors 201*and 205 for respectively moving theclutch 69 into position for effecting high=speed operationzof the windingapplying means, moving the clutch ;-126 intoposition' foreffecting low speed rotation of 'the .spindle .34..and .moving the clutch1144 into positionfor .efiecting'rotation of the cam drum .139; a switch .212 having vcontacts c and .d, and arms .213 and .214 respectively connected to the contacts a and .b .and constructed andarranged'so that the arms 213 and 214, in theposition shown, rrespectivel-y engage the .contactsc and d, and, in another position, the arm 213 engages thecontact d; .a solenoid 215 connected across the conductor201 and thecontactcfor moving the clutch 84 .into .a positionfor-effecting operation of the winding applying means in .one direction (e. g. downwardly); and-.a.solenoid .2l6 connected across the conductor 201 and :the :contact..d.-for moving the clutch 84 into a position for effecting operation -of the winding applying means in the opposite direction (e. g. clockwise or upwardly).

The switches206 and 212 may be arranged for manual operation, but, as already indicated, these switches may be under thecontrol of the timing mechanism. This may be accomplished providing mechanism for shifting each of these switches from one position to another at desired intervals determined by counting the number of various operations the machine has performed.

For example, the switch 206 may be controlled by a pair of solenoids 2-17 and 218 which respectively are energized by counting .switches 219 and 220 under the control ofthetiming mechanism switches 175 and 178, respectively. Likewise, the-switch 212 may be controlled by:a solenoid 221 which is-energized by counting switches under the control of the timing mechanism switches 176 and 177.for-alternatelyclosing and opening the solenoid switch 224, the armature of this-solenoid controlling the arms .213 and 214 being spring urged into the position shown when the solenoid is dc-energized.

- Operation Inoperation, with the master switch 203 closed, and with the switches 206 and 212 in the positions shownin Fig. 8, the machine isset up for applying a cylindrical or hoop winding such asshown in Fig. 2. .-In such .operation, the spindle 34 is rotated at high speed and the winding applying means is traversed in a downward direction along its substantially straight vertical path until it reaches the lower limit of .the.hoop winding, whereupon the switch 224 energizes the solenoid 221 to move the switch arm 213 into engagement with the contact d to energize the solenoid 216. The winding applying means is then traversed in an upward direction in thesame path until it reaches the upper limit of the hoop winding, whereupon the switch 224 is opened and this solenoid is de-energized to cause the switch arm 213 to move into the first mentioned and illustrated position. Alternate closing and opening of the switch 224 under the control of the timing mechanism effects traversing of the winding applying means.

After a predetermined number of layers of hoop windings have been applied, the switch 219 is caused to energize the solenoid 217 which moves the arm of the switch 206 into engagement with the contact b to set up the machine for applying an end-over-end winding such as shown in Fig. 1. In such operation, the spindle 34 is rotated at low speed, the winding applying means are operated at high speed to move the yarn guiding elements in an oval clockwise path, and the cam drum is rotated toeffecttilting of the spindle and to progressively vary the speed at which the spindle is rotated in small increments. During such operation, thearm 214 engages the contact d tomaintain the clutch solenoid 216 energized and effect clockwise movement of the yarn .applying means. This operation continues until 'the .switch 220 is caused to energize the.solenoid.218 to reverse the switch 206 .to the-position shownherein.

Conclusion From the foregoing description, it will be seen that the .present inventionprovides a-relativelysimple, practicaland efiicientmachine .for applying hoop and .endover-end windings .on shells to either build up a containerstructure or to reinforce the same, provision being made for rapidly switching from one type of winding to another. The machine is .suflicientlyrugged in construction to withstandany rough usuage to which it may be normally subjected, .lbut yet is compact and requires only a small working-area.

The term yarnjis used in its broadest senseherein and is intended to include strands, filaments, strips, ribbons, wires, threads and the like formed of any material which is sufiicientlyfiexible to enable the same to be wound in the mannendescribed herein.

'While chains and sprockets have been disclosed as drive connecting meansffor various shafts herein, it will beundertsood that belt and pulley drives or their equivalents could beutilized, and, that the invention is in no way limited thereto.

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts herein, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificingiany-tof itsadvantages, it is to be -understood that all mattenhereinis do be interpreted as illustrative and not .in any limiting sense.

.I claim:

'1. 'Inawinding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object adapted to have yarn wound thereon, .meansfor rotating said support, means for guiding'the yarn to be wound on the object, endless flexibl'econveyor means for moving said yarn guiding meansabout the object in a continuous path disposed ina given plane and approximating the outline of the object to wind the yarn on the object, means for rockingsaid support'in a plane substantially perpendicular to'the plane in which'the continuous path is disposed, and means for progressivelychanging the speed of said support rotating means in synchronism with said support rocking means.

.2. A winding'machine according to claim 1, wherein said speed changing means'are constructed and arranged to cause .said supportrotating means to be operated at its lowest speed when said supportis in its intermediate position andat its highest speed'when in its endpositions.

3. A winding machineaccording to claim 1, including mechanism for controlling said speed changing means and said support rocking means, said mechanism comprising acam having a continuous helical dwell, follower means in said dwell-operatively connected to said speed changing means, follower'means in said dwell opposite said first mentioned follower means and operatively connected to said supportrocking means, and means for rotating said cam.

4. In a winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is'adapted to be wound,'means for mounting said support for tilting movement including means for rotating said support and the object thereon, a pivotally suspended member, a pair 'of spaced upper and lower parallel rods pivotally connected to saidmember and said mounting means,meansfor rocking said member to efiect tilting of said mounting means and the object on said support, and means for'winding'yarn on the object.

5. In a winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for tilting movement including means for rotating said support and the object'thereon, a member pivotally suspended adjacent one end thereof, a pair of spaced upper and lower parallel rods pivotally connected to said member and said mounting means, means for rocking said member to effect tilting of said mounting means and the object on said support, means for winding yarn on the object, and drive means for said rotating means including a drive sprocket on said member 'adiacent its pivotally suspended end, a driven sprocket on said member adjacent its other end, a chain connecting said drive and driven sprockets, a drive sprocket mounted on said member for rotation with said driven sprocket, a driven sprocket on said mounting means, and a chain connecting said last mentioned drive and driven sprockets.

6. In a winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for tilting movement including means for rotating said support and the object thereon, a pivotally suspended member, a pair of spaced upper and lower parallel rods pivotally connected to said member and said mounting means, means for rocking said member to etfect tilting of said mounting means and the object on said support, and means for winding yarn on the object, said mounting means including bearing means and means for slideably supporting said bearing means.

7. In a Winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for tilting movement including means for rotating said support and the object thereon, a pivotally suspended member, a pair of spaced upper and lower parallel rods pivotally connected to said member and said mounting means, means for rocking said member to effect tilting of said mounting means and the object on said support, and means for winding yarn on the object, said mounting means including bearing means and means for slideably supporting said bearing means and flexible sleeves for enclosing said bearing supporting means.

8. In a winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for tilting movement including means for rotating said support and the object thereon, a pair of parallel pivotally suspended members, a pair of spaced upper and lower parallel rods pivotally connected to each of said members and said mounting means, means for rocking said members to efiect tilting of said mounting means and the object on said support, and means for winding yarn on the object.

9. In a winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for tilting movement including means for rotating said support and the object thereon, a pair of parallel pivotally suspended members, a pair of spaced upper and lower parallel rods pivotally connected to each of said members and said mounting means, means for rocking said members to efiect tilting of said mounting means and the object on said support, and means for winding yarn on the object, said mounting means including a pair of bearings for pivotally supporting the same and means for slideably supporting each of said bearings.

10. In a winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said sup port for tilting movement including means for rotating said support and the object thereon, means for varying the speed of said support rotating means including a cam, a pivotally suspended member, a pair of spaced upper and lower parallel rods pivotally connected to said member and said mounting means, means operated by said cam for rocking said member to effect tilting of said mounting means and the object on said support, and means for winding yarn on the object.

11. In a winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for rotation, means for rotating said support, means for winding yarn on the object, and drive means for said Winding means including reversing means and speed change means for driving said Winding means at a high speed and a low speed through said reversing means.

12. in a Winding machine of the class described, the combination or" a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for rotation, means for rotating said support, means for winding yarn on the object, drive means for said winding means including reversing means and speed change means for driving said winding means at a high speed and a low speed through said reversing means, and means for progressively varying the speed of said support rotating means.

13. In a Winding machine of the class described, the combination of a support for an object on which yarn is adapted to be wound, means for mounting said support for rotation, means for rotating said support, means for winding yarn on the object, drive means for said winding means including reversing means and speed change means for driving said winding means at a high speed and a low speed through said reversing means, means for progressively varying the speed of said support rotating means, means for rocking said support mounting means, and a cam for controlling said last mentioned means and said speed varying means.

14. in a winding machine of the class described, 'the combination of a support for an object adapted to have yarn Wound thereon, means for rotating said support, means for guiding the yarn to be wound on the object, mechanism for selectively moving said yarn guiding means to apply an end-over-end winding on the object and to apply a hoop winding on the object, drive mechanism for said support rotating means, and automatic control means for said drive mechanism for efiecting rotation of said object at a low speed While an end-oven end winding is being applied and at a high speed while a hoop winding is being applied.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 730,635 Good June 9, 1903 1,250,436 Curry Dec. 18, 1917 2,019,364 Schweizer Oct. 29, 1935 2,115,636 Kinnear et al Apr. 26, 1938 2,340,436 Stone et al. Feb. 1, 1944 2,518,967 Witt Aug. 15, 1950 2,725,197 Taylor Nov. 29, 1955

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2975987 *Oct 27, 1959Mar 21, 1961Brunswick Balke Collender CoPolar wind apparatus
US3111279 *May 5, 1961Nov 19, 1963Specialties Dev CorpWinding machine
US3144952 *Jun 15, 1960Aug 18, 1964Us Rubber CoFilament wound container
US3232545 *Aug 15, 1963Feb 1, 1966Taylor CorpFilament winding machine
US3276936 *Jun 17, 1964Oct 4, 1966Us Rubber CoFilament winding apparatus
US3317146 *Aug 15, 1962May 2, 1967Voit Rubber CorpMethod of winding a reinforcing cord on a hollow spheroid
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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/436, 156/169, 242/176, 29/452, 242/173, 29/DIG.420, 156/172, 29/421.1
International ClassificationB29C53/80, B29C53/62, B21D51/24, B21F99/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21D51/24, B29C53/62, B21F17/00, B29C53/8041, Y10S29/042
European ClassificationB29C53/62, B21D51/24, B29C53/80B4, B21F17/00