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Publication numberUS2859000 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1958
Filing dateJul 2, 1954
Priority dateJul 2, 1954
Publication numberUS 2859000 A, US 2859000A, US-A-2859000, US2859000 A, US2859000A
InventorsKenneth M Mclellan
Original AssigneeInd Rayon Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bobbin
US 2859000 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 4, 1958 K. M. MCLELLAN 2,859,000

BOBBIN Filed July 2'. 1954 SUPEPELEVA TED lnven tor NOE/ML K nneth M. M LeLLan, Srgoze 10 J22 2:222:25 BOLTON H His gtdioryegw United States Patent-O "BOBBIN Kenneth McLellan, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to In-v dustrial Rayon Corporatiom...Cleveland, Ohio, at corporation of Delaware Application'iluiy 2, 1954,'-Serial=No. 441,069

- 5 Claims. ,(Cl. 242125.2)

This invention relates to a flanged bobbin that is adapted to receive a transfer tail of yarn-woundabout one of its flanges.

Transfer tails areprovided onyarn packages so that thepackages can be directly employed in creeling operations, and for other purposes. -A transfer tail eliminates the need for an intermediate package-reformation. Tr-ansfer tails, also known asmagazine wraps or pigtails, advantageously should be in a readilyaccessible place on a bobbin yarn package. They are formed with a segment of an inner length o f-yarn that is first wound 'into the of supply, ibis diflicult'to provide transfer tails during collection. This is especially so since the yarn is being continuously suppliedat relatively rapidrates to a bobbin, for example, in a cap twister or ring-twistertake-up assembly. In such instances it is impracticable to even momentarily discontinue or decelerate-the rate of yarn supply sogas to allow a transfer tail to-be manually formed or placed on the bobbin.

The present inventionadvantageously provides for a flanged, yarn package supporting bobbin adapted to receive in one of its flanges a transfer tailof a yarn that is being wound on it. The bobbin of thepresent invention can be utilized inringor cap twisting yarn take-up assemblies, and it is particularly adapted to the cap twisting yarn take-up assemblies having anincorporated transfer tail forming means similarto that disclosed and claimed in the applicants co-pending application, Serial No. 434,724, filed on June 7, 1954, now Patent No. 2,787,112.

In accordance with the presentinvention a flanged, yarn package supporting bobbin has a peripheral groove-in its lower flange for receiving and supporting'a transfer tail of yarn being collected on the bobbin. The groove forms inner and outer walls on the circumference of the lower bobbin flange which separate the respective inner and outer faces of the flange from the groove. The inner wall is cut away to the depth of the groove for asubstantial portion of its periphery. The cut away portion of 'the inner wall picks up theyarn being wound on the bobbin to direct it to the groove Whenever an inner length of an end of yarn beingflrst wound on the-bobbin is guided or moved out over the lower flange of the bobbin. One or more wraps of yarn may thus be wound in the groove on the flange to provide a transfer tail. The end of yarn is then returned through the cut away portion of the inner wall'to be wound on the bobbin. A notch also is provided on the circumference of the lower flange through the outer wall to facilitate removal of yarn .wound in the groove. In addition, counterweighting means are advantageously provided on the bobbin to dynamically balance it during rotation.

-Patented Nov. 4, 1958 '2 Further advantages will become apparent in the following description and 'the accompanyingxidrawing .in which like reference numerals refer to like. parts, Wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view, partly in section, of a bobbinin accordance with'the present invention supporting a yarn package having a transfer tail,

Figure 2 is a fragmentary 'front elevation of part of the bobbin showing the peripherally grooved and recessed lower flange,

Figure 3 is a sectional view of the lower bobbin flange and part of the yarn core taken along the line"3,- -3 in Figure 4,

Figure 4 is a plan view; partly insection, of the lower bobbin flange on the yarn core,

Figure 5 is a fr-agmentary-jsectional view of the lower bobbin flange enlarged from Figure 4 to show several up apparatus.

With reference to the first fivefigures' of the drawing, and initially to Figure 1, there is illustrateda bobbin supporting a yarn packageyindicated generally by the numeral 10. Thelayersofyarn wound. on the bobbin are cut-back and shown partly in section. The bobbin comprises a core 11, an upper flange 12, and a base or lower flange, indicated generally by the reference numeral 13. The package supported on -the bobbin is formed according to conventional practice by winding an end -of yarn -16 on the bobbin core llgbetween the upper and lower flanges 12 and 15, in successive layers of yarn"17. The lowerflange 13 of the bobbin, 'more specifically shown in Figures 2 and 3, isprovided with a peripheral groove 18. The groove 18 in the flange periphery forms an inner wall 19 and an outer wall'20, both encircling the flange. The inner wall 19, located onthe same side of the lower flange 13 as the 'core 11,- separates the inner face 14 of the flange 13, which abuts yarn Wound in the bobbin, from the groove" '18. "The outer wall 20 separates the outer face 15 of the flange 13, at the lower endofthe bobbin,-fromthe groove 18.

Preferably, the groove 18 is poistioned more towards the inner-face 14 of the flange 13'from its interfacial center plane-to provide for a relatively .thinner .inner wall 19 in comparision to the outer Wall20. Thisis' desirable to avoid a hang-up of the yarn during its transfer from the core 11 to the groove '18 and'ba'ck again or while it is being'wound in the groove to provide a transfer tail. As more specifically shown in Figures 2 and 3, the inner Wall 19 is advantageously rounded and smooth along its outer circumferential edge portion. Flat spots, roughnesses or other surface irregularities on the outer circumference of the inner wall 19 tend to impart loops to the yarn while it is being wound in the groove 18.

The inner wall 19 is cut away tothe depth of the groove 18 for a substantial portion of its periphery, as illustrated by the angle a in Figure 4. Advantageously, the cut away portion, indicated by reference numeral 21, forming the angle a may extend forbetween about 60 and about 120 .along .the flange .circumference, .and preferably, for best operation, about of the inner wall is cut away. As illustrated in Figure 2, it is. desirable for the inner wall 19 to be taperedand. rounded smooth at the edges of the cut-away-21. Such. construction assists materially in the pick-up ofyarnwhen itris guided over the flange to be wound into the groove. Also, it permits the smooth return of the yarn from the groove to the core after the transfer tail has been formed.

Further, a notch 22 is advantageously provided on the circumference of the lower flange between the outer face 15 of the flange 13 and the groove 18 in its periphery. As shown in Figure 5 the notch 22 is cut into the flange 13 slightly deeper than the groove 18. It is positioned on the circumference of the flange about opposite the cutaway 21 in the inner wall 19. More specifically, it is positioned about opposite the center of the cut-away. The notch 22 is useful for permitting an easy release of yarn wound as a transfer tail in the groove by allowing for ready access thereto. Scissors or other suitable instruments may be inserted in the notch 22 to cut the yarn 16 and thus release it as a transfer tail. Or, if transfer tails of longer length are desired, a hook or other instrument inserted in the notch 22 may be employed to catch one or more wraps of the yarn 16 and pull it out of the groove over the outer wall 20. The wraps of yarn so released may then be cut to present the transfer tail on extending the yarn.

Advantageously the bobbin may be dynamically balanced to minimize vibrations and the like when it is being rotated at a collection or yarn take-up speed. Such speeds, in certain take-up apparatus, such as cap twisters, may be as great as 8,000 revolutions or more per minute. A centrifugally unbalanced bobbin may cause vibration, poor performance and excessive wear or even damage when it is rotated at a relatively high rate. weighting means for balancing may be included in the bobbin. Conveniently these are located in its lower flange.

For example, a counterweighting effect may be provided by a balance hole 23 bored in the outer face 15 of the lower flange 13 across from the cut-away 21. This counterbalances the flange and countereffects unbalance which might result from the cut-away 21 in the inner wall 19 and the notch 22. Other counterweighing means such as weights and the like may also be employed for the bobbin.

A transfer tail for a yarn package supported on a bobbin in accordance with the present invention may be formed in various ways during collection of the yarn without interrupting the rotation of the bobbin during the take-up period in which the package is formed. The transfer tail is wound in the peripheral groove 18 of the flange 13 by guiding or directing an inner length of an end of yarn being first wound in the bobbin out over the lower flange. The cut away portion 21 of the inner wall 19 picks up the yarn and directs it to the groove 18 wherein at least one turn or wrap, preferably several, is wound to provide a transfer tail. After a desired amount of yarn has been wound in the groove 18, the yarn is guided or directed back onto the core 11 between the bobbin flanges 12 and 13 through the recess. The package may then be wound in a normal manner.

The guiding of the yarn 16 outwardly from the bobbin 10 over the lower flange and into the groove is preferably done as soon as possible after the yarn is thrownon the core according to normal techniques and the collection has been started. It may, for this purpose, be manually guided or directed thereinto. More desirably, however, the bobbin 10 is employed in a takeup apparatus which is adapted to momentarily guide and handle the yarn in such a desired manner. For example, in a ring twister the ring guide may momentarily be brought down over the flange 13 for one or several rotations. Or the bobbin 10 may momentarily be lifted upward for the same purpose. Similar and analogous methods employed in a cap twister will accomplish like results. I

Advantageously, the bobbin 10 is employed in a cap twister apparatus which is adapted to momentarily additionally extend the bobbin for more than a normal upward stroke in the cap. In other words, the bobbin is Countersuperelevated on an upward stroke within the cap to bring the lower flange 13 up in the cap. The end of yarn is then picked up by the cut away portion 21 of the inner'wall 19 on the flange 13 to wind one or more wraps as a transfer tail in the groove 18.

Figures 6 and 7 illustrate the effect of superelevating the bobbin 10 in a cap to form a transfer tail wound in the groove 18. Figure 6 depicts the normal vertically reciprocating stroke of the bobbin 10 within a cap 24. At the top of a normal stroke the whole of the bobbin 10 excepting the lower flange 13 is up within the cap 24 leaving sufiicient clearance between the inner face 14 of the lower flange 13 and the lower yarn guiding circumference of the cap 24 for the end of yarn 16 to be taken-up on the bobbin core 11. At the bottom of a normal stroke the bobbin is in a position depicted by the dotted lines. The inner face of the upper flange 12 of the bobbin is about even with the lower guiding circumference of the cap 24. The bobbin 10 thus takes up the yarn 16 up to against the inner face of the upper flange 12. In Figure 7, a part of the lower flange 13 of the bobbin 10 is brought up within the cap 24 at the top of a superelevated upward stroke of the bobbin. This permits the cut-away 21 to pick up the yarn 16 and to cause it to be wound for one or more turns of the bobbin in the peripheral groove 18 of the lower flange 13. When the bobbin is returned to a normal stroke from a superelevated position, the yarn 16 passes out of the groove 18 through the opposite side of the cut-away 21 from which it was picked up. It then is Wound in a normal manner on the core 11 between the flanges 12 and 13 to form a yarn package which has thus been provided with a transfer tail.

A relatively wide cut away portion in the inner wall of a lower bobbin flange in accordance with the present invention provides for many advantages. A bobbin having such a construction is well adapted for employment with take-up apparatus of the cap-twister variety which can be provided with a bobbin superelevating means as heretofore explained. This is particularly so when the take-up apparatus winds the yarn on the bobbin through a relatively slow traverse and the yarn is being laid on the bobbin core at a relatively smaller pitch or degree of helical advance. A narrower cut-away cannot be continually relied upon to properly pick up slightly pitched yarn or to return it for winding on the bobbin core after the transfer tail has been wound in the groove.

Further, the substantial cut away portion of the inner wall permits for ready and convenient identification of the inlet and outlet segments of the transfer tail in the groove. For example, if a bobbin is rotated counterclockwise the inlet segment or inner end of the yarn always passes through the cut-away at its right side, when looking down on the bobbin from above its upper flange. The outlet segment is then, of course, on the left side. The inlet and outlet segments of the transfer tail are thus readily distinguishable. The converse is true when the bobbin has been rotated clockwise during collection. It is of advantage to be able to distinguish the inlet and outlet segments in such a relatively simple manner. Proper identification may avoid an inadvertent severance of a wrong portion of the transfer tail which might result in its being effectively destroyed.

Since certain changes in the practice of this invention may obviously be made without departing from its spirit or scope, it is to be understood that all of the foregoing description be interpreted and considered as merely illustrative and in no sense limiting of the invention, as particularly pointed out and defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a flanged bobbin adapted to receive, as a transfer tail, on the periphery of one of its flanges a portion of yarn being initially wound on said bobbin; a pcripheral yarn receiving groove in a flange of said bobbin; ,and a wall encircling said flange separating said groove and the inner face of said flange, said wall being cut away about to the depth of said groove for between about 60 and about 120 of its periphery.

27 In a flanged bobbin adapted to receive, as a transfer tail, on the periphery of one of its flanges a portion a portion of yarn being initially wound on said bobbin; a peripheral yarn receiving groove in a flange of said bobbin; inner and outer walls encircling said flange separating said groove from the inner and outer faces respectively of said flange, said inner wall being cut away about to the depth of said groove for between about 60 and about 120 of its periphery; and a notch on the circumference of said flange extending through said outer wall and communicating between saidgroove and the outer face of said flange.

3. In a bobbin according to claim 2 wherein said inner wall is cut away for about 90 of its periphery and wherein said notch ispositioned on the circumference of said lower flange about opposite the cut away portion of said inner wall.

4. In a flanged bobbin adapted to receive, as a transfer tail on the periphery of one of its flanges a portion of yarn being initially wound on said bobbin; a peripheral yarn receiving groove in a flange of said bobbin; inner and outer walls encircling said flange separating said groove from the inner and outer faces respectively of said flange, said inner wall being cut away about to the depth of said groove for between about 60 and about 120 of its periphery, said inner wall being thinner than said outer wall and being rounded along its outer edge and tapered rounded at its cut away portion; and a notch on the circumference of said flange about opposite the cut away portion of said inner wall, said notch being deeper in said flange than said groove and extending through said outer wall and communicating between said groove and the outer face of said flange.

5. In a flanged bobbin adapted to receive, as a transfer tail, on the periphery of one of its flanges a portion of yarn being initially wound on said bobbin; a peripheral yarn receiving groove in a flange of said bobbin; inner and outer walls encircling said flange separating said groove from the inner and outer faces respectively of said flange, said inner wall being cut away about to the depth of said groove for between about and about of its periphery, said inner wall being thinner than said outer wall and being r ounded along its outer edge and tapered rounded at its cut away portion; a notch on the circumference of said flange about opposite the cut away portion of said inner wall, said notch being deeper in said flange than said groove and extending through said outer wall and communicating between said groove and the outer face of said flange; and counterweighting means on said flange for dynamically balancing said bobbin during rotation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNlTED STATES PATENTS 1,881,383 Wylie Oct. 4, 1932 2,298,357 Elvin et a1. Oct. 13, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1881383 *Sep 4, 1929Oct 4, 1932Harris Bros Silk CompanyWound package
US2298357 *Oct 4, 1940Oct 13, 1942Celanese CorpPackage support
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3215965 *Jun 4, 1962Nov 2, 1965Gen ElectricLayer wound inductance coil
US3230489 *Dec 3, 1962Jan 18, 1966Amerline CorpBobbin with grooves in edge of flange
US4387863 *Dec 17, 1981Jun 14, 1983Western Electric Company, Inc.Spool assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/125.2
International ClassificationB65H75/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/14, B65H2701/515, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H75/14