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Publication numberUS2859789 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1958
Filing dateMay 24, 1957
Priority dateMay 24, 1957
Publication numberUS 2859789 A, US 2859789A, US-A-2859789, US2859789 A, US2859789A
InventorsBuckett Arthur C W
Original AssigneeBuckett Arthur C W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Key-holder
US 2859789 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

YNOV- 11, 1958 AA. c. w. BUCKETT. 2,859,789

KEY-HOLDER Filed May l24, 1957 INVENTOR.

United States Patent O KEY-HOLDER Arthur C. W. Buckett, Evanston, Ill. Application May 24, 1957, Serial No. 661,320 4 Claims. (Cl. 150-40) This inventionv relates to key-holders for holding one or more spare keys.

One Vobject of the present invention is toprovide a new and improved key-holder adapted to hold one or more spare keys so that they will be quickly available for use in the event that the users main set of keys is lost or misplaced.

A further object is to provide a new and improved key-holder which is so arranged that the keys may readily be replaced in the keyholder.

Another object is to provide a new and improved keyholder which is adapted to be received conveniently in a mans hip-pocket wallet or vest pocket, or in a ladys wallet, purse, or bag.

Still another object is to provide a new and improved key-holder which is convenient and highly durable, yet is easy to manufacture and extremely low in cost.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will appear from the following description, taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a key-holder to be described as an illustrative embodiment of the present invention. Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the key-holder.

. Fig. `3 is an end elevational view.

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal sectional View, taken generally along a line 4 4 in Fig. l. Fig. 5 is a transverse sectional view, taken generally along a line 5--5 in Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional View, somewhat similar to Fig. 4, but showing the keyholder in a ilexed'position, such as it might assume in use, when carried in `a hip pocket wallet.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view, somewhat similar to Fig. 4, but showing a modified construction.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view, somewhat similar to Fig. 5, but showing another View of the same modified construction shown in Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a plan view of another modified key-holder adapted to hold three keys.

As already indicated, Figs. 1-6 illustrate a key-holder 10 for -use in carrying one or more spare keys in the users pocket, wallet, purse, bag, or the like. Thus, the key-holder 10 comprises a thin flat resilient body or plate 12 of a thickness corresponding generally to that of 'an ordinary milled key adapted to operate tumbler locks or the like. The illustrated plate is substantially rectangular in form and is made of such a size as to 'iit conveniently in a vest-pocket or a card-pocket of the type usually provided on a mans hip-pocket wallet. For convenience in inserting the key-holder into such a pocket, the plate 12 is formed with rounded corners 14. As shown to best advantage in Figs. 2 and 3, the plate 12has longitudinal and transverse marginal edges 16 fand 18, `which are smoothly rounded so that the plate will slide easily into a pocket or the like. One or more transverse fingernail grooves 20 may be formed in either or both faces of the plate 12, adjacent to either or both ice ends thereof, for use in removing the plate from a pocket.

In order to accommodate one or more keys, the plate or body 12 of the key-holder is formed with one or more sockets or apertures which are generally key-shaped. Thus, the key-holder 10 of Figs. 1-6 is provided with two such apertures or openings 22 and 23. The aperture 22 is of a shape corresponding generally to that of a typical small key, such as those commonly employed for operating the ignition and door locks of automobiles. Such a key 24 is shown in the aperture 22. The aperture or socket 23 is made somewhat larger than the socket 22, to accommodate a typical large key, such as those commonly employed for operating door locks on homes and offices. Such a larger key 25 is shown in the aperture 23.

The apertures 22 and 23 for the keys 24 and 25 are made somewhat oversize so that a variety of keys may be accommodated conveniently. Usually large keys, or odd-shaped keys may be accommodated by enlarging the apertures slightly with a le, knife, or other suitable tool.

The keys 24 and 25 are adapted to be retained in the apertures 22 and 23 by means of upper straps or bridges 26 and lower straps 28 which extend transversely across` each of the apertures or openings, on opposite sides of the plate or body 12. It will be seen that the under sides of the straps 26 and 28 are spaced apart by the body-plate 12, thus a distance corresponding generally to the thickness of a typical cylinder lock door-key, so

that the keys 24 and 25 will be retained in the apertures 4 22 and 23, between the straps 26 and 28. It is most advantageous to form the straps or bridges 26 and 28 integrally with the body or plate 12. This may readily be done by molding the body 12 and the straps 26 and 28 in one piece from one of various plastics having suitable physical properties, so that the plate and the straps will be strong, tough, moderately pliable, and fully resilient. Suitable plastic materials include cellulose acetate, nylon, vinyl, polyethylene, polystyrene and the like. The tougher and more resilient of these plastics are preferred.

It will be seen that the key-receiving apertures 22 and 23 are somewhat elongated and are arranged to extend generally lengthwise with respect to the plate 12. The two apertures 22 and 23 are reversed in position from end to end, with respect to each other, so as to conserve space. The illustrated straps or bridges 26 and 28 are narrow with respect to the length of the apertures 22 and 23 and are arranged to extend transversely across the apertures. It willbe seen that the straps 26 and 28 are generally parallel to one another.

It will be seen that two of the straps 26 and 28 are provided on each side of the plate 12 for each of the apertures 22 and 23. In the illustrated key-holder 10, two straps 26 are provided for each aperture onl one side of the plate 12, while two o-f the straps 28 are provided for each aperture on the opposite side. It will also be seen that, in all cases, the strap or straps 26 or 28, or both, may be made continuous across more than one aperture, thus accomplishing improvement in stability, uniformity and simplicity of construction and appearance. The straps 26 and 28 on each side are spaced apart from each other and disposed at different intermediate points with regard to the ends of each of the apertures 22 and 23.

It will be seen that the apertures 22 and 23 are formed with enlarged end portions so as to facilitate the insertion into and removal of the keys into and out of the apertures, the enlarged end portions being adapted to house the heads of the keys.

Each of the apertures 22 and 23 is formed with a beveled edge 34 at the enlarged end of the aperture. The bevel 34 is made wide and gradual so as to facilitate the insertion. and removal of the keys. The-bevel Patented Nov. 11, 19587 may be formed on one side of the plate 12, as shown, or on both sides and at one end of the plate or both.

The straps 26 and 28 are arranged to project slightly from the opposite sides of the plate 12, in the manner shown in Figs. 1 6, but since the straps are quite thin, they will offer very little interference to smooth and easy handling of the product.

It will be seen that all ends of the straps 26 and 28 are rounded olf to about a half circle, as shown in Fig. 2, and that all projecting edges 3i) of the projected parts of the straps are also rounded off, to accomplish smoothness of handling and ease of insertion into and removal from a wallet, pocket, or elsewhere.

It will be seen that the key receiving apertures 22 and 23 of the key-holder 10, shown in Figs. 1 6, are positioned toward one edge of the plate or body 12, so as to provide a clear unbroken space or panel 58 extending along the opposite edge of the plate from one end to the other thereof. This vclear panel 58 may be employed very advantageously to carry an advertising message or the like. The key-holder may be made at such low cost that it may be given away in large numbers by various advertisers, for the sake of circulating an advertising message. The message may be molded directly into the body 12, or may be applied by printing, stamping or in any other suitable manner.

It will be seen that Figs. 7 and 8 show a slightly modified key-holder 40, in which the straps 26 are replaced with straps 42 which are set down into the aperture 44,

as shown in Figs. 7 and 8, so that the top faces of the straps will be flush with the top face of the plate 46. This modification has the advantage of providing a smooth, unobstructed top surface on the key-holder, thus providing an increased area for the advertising message. It is noteworthy, however, that the arrangement of Figs. 1 6 has the advantage of permitting the use of a body-plate 12, of less thickness, thus less bulky and more flexible. In other respects, the modified keyholder may be the same as the key-holder 10 of Figs. 1 6.

It will be seen that the straps 26 and 28 of the keyholder 10, shown in Figs. 1 6, are offset so that the adjacent straps 26 and 28 will not be directly opposite or overlap each other. The off-setting of the straps facilitates the molding of the key-holder in one piece using a standard two-part injection-type mold, and thus accomplishes the best means of manufacturing this device inexpensively.

This offsetting arrangement is highly favorable, as it greatly improves the space where a key is inserted into, or withdrawn from, a key-socket or aperture, thus favorably facilitating those operations.

The material to be used in this molding procedure is such that the key-holder will be pliable under stress, so that it will accommodate itself to the curvature of the body, as required when the key-holder is carried in a hip-pocket wallet. Moreover, the key-holder is resilient so that it will return fully to its original flat condition, when the stress is relieved.

Fig. 6 illustrates the` manner in which the key-holder may be flexed when it is carried in a hip-pocket wallet or the like. The flexing is due to the bending of the wallet to conform to the shape of the users body. Of course, the keys remain unflexed in the holder, but the plate or body 12 is flexed or bent as shown. The resilient straps 26 and 28 and their relative placement permit this relative iexing between the key-holder and the keys. Moreover, the positioning and action of the straps is such as to minimize the extent to which the keys project beyond the opposite sides of the key-holder. Thus, as shown in Fig. 6, the ends of the key project only slightly above the upper face of the plate 12, while the midportion of thekey projects to only a slight extent beyond the lower face of the plate 12.

.F-ig. 9 shows another modified key-holder 50, consisting of a body-plate 51, which is provided with rounded corners, fully rounded edges throughout its perimeter, and with two apertures 122 and 123, two keys 124 and 125, straps, etc., all somewhat similar to, and placed in positions also somewhat similar to the two apertures 22 and 23, etc., in Fig. l, plus also a third aperture 52 for receiving a third key 54. The aperture 52 is provided with a set of the straps 126 and 128, as in the embodiment of Figs. 1 6. It will be seen that the three apertures in the key-holder 50 alternate in endwise position to conserve space. In other respects, the key-holder 50 may be the same as in Figs. 1 6. Accordingly corresponding parts are given the same reference characters in Fig. 9 as in Figs. 1 6, with the addition of the prefix 1.

It will be seen that straps 126 and 12S in Fig. 9 have been made continuous across two and three apertures, and as has been described in relation to strips 26 and 28, as shown in Fig. l, thus likewise accomplishing a better product, in structure, usage and appearance, by doing so.

In use, a key is inserted into the holder by flexing to a slight extent the body of the holder with one hand, while inserting the key into its aperture, then between the retaining straps, with the other hand. The beveled edge at'the end of the aperture greatly facilitates this operation. The key is removed by a reverse sequence of operations.

The key-holder, with one or more keys therein, may readily be inserted into a pocket of a hip-pocket wallet, purse or the like. facilitates the removal of the key-holder from a wallet or the like.

Various modifications, alternative constructions and equivalents may be employed without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention, as exemplified in the foregoing description and defined in the following claims:

I claim:

1. A key-holder comprising a thin fiat resilient plate having an elongated aperture therethrough in the general shape of a key, first and second straps formed integrally with said plate and extending transversely across said aperture on one side of said plate at spaced intermediate points along the length thereof, and third and fourth straps formed integrally with said plate and extending transversely across said aperture on the opposite side of said plate at spaced intermediate points along the length thereof, said straps being narrow relative to the length of said aperture, the undersides of said third and fourth straps being spaced from the undersides of said first and second straps for confining a key therebetween in said aperture, said third and fourth straps being staggered longitudinally of said aperture relative to said first and second straps to facilitate insertion and removal of a key into and out of said aperture, said aperture having a beveled edge portion at one end thereof to facilitate insertion and removal of the key.

2. A key-holder, comprising a plate having a generally key-shaped aperture therein, and thin bridges formed integrally with said plate and extending across said aperture on opposite sides of said plate, said bridges being spaced apart for confining a key in said aperture therebetween, said aperture having a beveled edge portion at one end thereof to facilitate insertion and removal of the key.

3. A holder for a key or the like, said holder comprising a thin flat elongated resilient plate having an elongated aperture therethrough with the elongated dimension of said aperture extending longitudinally of said plate, first and second straps integral with-said plate and extending across said aperture on one side of said plate, and at least one additional strap integral with said plate and extending across said aperture on the opposite side of -said plate for confining a key in said aperture, said straps being of a width amounting to a minor fraction of the The fingernail groove in the key-holder length of said aperture and disposed at diierent points along said aperture to facilitate insertion and removal of the key into and out of said aperture, each of said straps having an underside facing into said aperture, said undersides of said first and second straps being in a plane spaced from the underside of said additional strap to aiord room in said aperture for the key therebetween without substantial deformation of said straps.

4. A holder for a key or the like, said holder comprising a thin ilat elongated resilient plate having an elongated aperture therethrough with the elongated dimension of said aperture extending longitudinally of said plate, rst and second straps integral with said plate and extending across said aperture on one side of said plate, and at least one additional strap integral with said plate and extending across said aperture on the opposite side of said plate for confining a key in said aperture, said straps being of a width amounting to a minor fraction of the length of said aperture and disposed at different points along said aperture to facilitate insertion and removal of the key into and out of said aperture, each of said straps having an inside facing into said aperture, the undersides of said first and second straps being substantially, in the plane of said one side of said plate, the underside of said additional strap being substantially in the plane of said opposite side of said plate, the underside of said additional strap thereby being spaced apart from the plane of the undersides of said rst and second straps by an amount corresponding to the thickness of said plate to afford room for reception of the key in said aperture without substantial deformation of said straps.

References Cited in the flle of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 673,299 Spies Apr. 30, 1901 912,446 Clarke Feb. 16, 1909 2,734,624 Kernicki Feb. 14, 1956 20 2,756,794 Buckett July 31, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US673299 *Dec 15, 1900Apr 30, 1901John Nelson SpiesCoin-holding card.
US912446 *May 18, 1908Feb 16, 1909Lemuel H ClarkeCoin-mailing card.
US2734624 *Dec 31, 1952Feb 14, 1956 Kernickl
US2756794 *Feb 21, 1955Jul 31, 1956Buckett Arthur C WKey holder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4300610 *Jan 31, 1980Nov 17, 1981Bermas Plastics Company, Inc.Card-like holder
US4637236 *Jun 12, 1984Jan 20, 1987Almblad Donald FKey and retainer card combination
US4886159 *Jul 28, 1988Dec 12, 1989Grandy Clarence EMultikey carrier
US5829580 *Jul 22, 1997Nov 3, 1998Dci Marketing, Inc.Key case
US6232876 *Sep 9, 1999May 15, 2001Key-Trak, Inc.Mobile object tracking system
US6392543Feb 12, 2001May 21, 2002Key-Trak, Inc.Mobile object tracking system
US6424260Oct 9, 2001Jul 23, 2002Key-Trak, Inc.Mobile object tracking system
US6427913Sep 9, 1999Aug 6, 2002Key-Trak, Inc.Object control and tracking system with zonal transition detection
US6501379Feb 26, 2001Dec 31, 2002Key-Trak, Inc.Object carriers for an object control and tracking system
US6693538Dec 5, 2001Feb 17, 2004Key-Trak, Inc.Object carriers for an object control and tracking system
US6727817Nov 6, 2002Apr 27, 2004Key-Trak, Inc.Tamper detection and prevention for an object control and tracking system
US6891473Jan 31, 2003May 10, 2005Key-Trak, Inc.Object carriers and lighted tags for an object control and tracking system
US6958698Mar 4, 2004Oct 25, 2005Key-Trak, Inc.Tamper detection and prevention for an object control and tracking system
US7005984Nov 7, 2003Feb 28, 2006Key-Trak, Inc.Object carriers for an object control and tracking system
US7046145Dec 16, 2004May 16, 2006Key Control Holding, Inc.Object carriers for an object control and tracking system
US7109864Jan 21, 2005Sep 19, 2006Key Control Holding, Inc.Object carriers and lighted tags for an object control and tracking system
US7202785Mar 15, 2005Apr 10, 2007Key Control Holding, Inc.Mobile object tracking system
US7360380Nov 1, 2005Apr 22, 2008Master Lock Company LlcLock box
USRE32914 *Feb 10, 1988May 2, 1989Creditcard Keys CompanyKey and retainer card combination
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/37.4, D03/212, D03/207
International ClassificationA45C11/00, A45C11/32
Cooperative ClassificationA45C11/326
European ClassificationA45C11/32S2