Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2860382 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1958
Filing dateMay 6, 1953
Priority dateMay 6, 1953
Publication numberUS 2860382 A, US 2860382A, US-A-2860382, US2860382 A, US2860382A
InventorsRichard A Garrett
Original AssigneeArmstrong Cork Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Textile fiber unit
US 2860382 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 18, 1958 R. A- GARRETT TEXTILE FIBER UNIT Filed May e. 1953 T W W W. A S R A H m R attouw United States Patent TEXTILE FIBER UNIT Richard A. Garrett, Manor Township, Lancaster County, Pa., assignor to Armstrong Cork Company, Lancaster, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application May 6, 1953, Serial No. 353,307

16 Claims. (Cl. 19-143) This invention relates to textile fiber working units such as pencil roll covers, long draft aprons, comber detaching rolls, and the like. Pencil roll covers are used in the textile fiber working industry in SacoLowell and similar type machines and serve the purpose ofcon.- trolling fiber draft. In such operation the roll, covers frictionally engage the fibers and; static electricity on the roll surface causes the fibers to be disrupted, resulting in the creation of waste which floats about the mill and collects on the machines, creating a substantial nuisance and' often resulting, in the production of defective' yarn. In. long draft aprons, the textile fibers lie in engagement. with the working. surface af the apron or aprons, and these, too, must have a static-free working surface in order to form-high quality yarn. In aprons, the working surface must be yielding andv resilient, and. the apron structure should be free of any tendency toward excessive growth or stretchingv during operation. It should also be resistant to attack by thev oils enr countered in use. Comber detaching rolls serve to disengage the fibers from the combers, and the presence, of static electricity on the rolls would cause the fine webof fibers to be disrupted and an uneven web to. be formed. Similar problems are encountered in other textile fiber working units such as twister rolls, selfweighted Washburn rolls, and the like.

It is an object of this. invention toprovide a textile composition of a resin selected from the group consist-- ing of polyvinyl chloride, the polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing; about 95% vinyl chloride and about vinyl acetate,

and mixtures thereof, each 100 parts by weight of the resin having incorporated therewith between about 50;

parts by weight and 150 parts by weight of plasticizer for the resin which is compatible with the resin in such proportions at temperatures above 45 F. and renders the composition static-free, said plasticizer being selected from the group consisting of: (a) an ester, the acid component of which is selected, from the group consisting of at least one aliphatic acid, phosphoric acid, andphosphonic acid, the molecular weight of the aliphatic portion of said ester representing more than 50% of the total molecular Weight of said ester, (b) Z-ethylhexyl diester amide, (0) fatty acid nitrile of C -C fatty acids, C4H9OC2H4OC2H4O C2H4OC4H9, and e) mixtures of two or more of the above plasticizers,

Patented Nov. 18, 1958 and: (a): m xtur s o o: or re f th bove. plas ticizers. Such unit may be secured to a roll structure as; in the case, of, the pencil or slip roll covers or may. be formed into a tubular product and severedinto productsz, such. as; aprons or the like. If required, a. reinforcing cord may be provided within the body ofthe unit in, the manner, described in Billmeyer. Patent. 2,470,599; granted May 17, 1949. It hasbeen found, however, that; for some services. the use: of a, reinforcing: COIidf is not. necessary.

The attached drawing illustrates a number of'embodh ments of the, invention asfollows:

Figure l is a top plan view of apencil or-sli'p roll.hav-- ing applied thereto a. cover made in accordance with the; present invention;

Figure 2 is asectional view taken along line II"-II of Figure 1';

Figure 3 is an end view of a longdraft apron made in accordance with, the. present, invention. mounted; in. a. typical Casablanca type framewhich has. been diagram! matically shown;

Figure 4" is. a perspective view of a, section. of tubing. made in. accordance with the present invention and. adapt: ed for severance into aprons; and,

Figure 5 is. a perspective view. showing a pencil or slip. roll cover suitable for mounting upon: the roll structure of Figure 1.

In Figure 1, the roll body 2 is of conventional shape or configuration and. may beformed of metal. It has a cover 3v mounted thereon made in accordance with; the present. invention, said cover having a workin surface 4,,

In Eigure,3 an. apron 5 is shown as. encircling a;dr i,v .-v ing roll. and. a. front. bar 7. The apron, 5, is shown; as; made from a. tubular body 8 in accordance with, the present invention, andv the apron. has a,- working surface 9 Inthis embodiment. the apron is. not reinforcedg; but; as previously mentioned, a reinforcing cord may b e;pr,o videdl as taught by Billmeyer.

In Figure 41 a, section of tubular stock 10 is shown; which may be severed into. appropriate pieces for as aprons.

Figure 5 shows a pencil rollcover 11 Which-isforrneQ without a reinforcement of. any sort, and may be; ad hesively secured to a metal pencil roll. to form a struc ture such asv that, shown in Figures. 1. and 2. i

In the preparation, of the composition of the present; invention for use in the fabrication of a pencil roll; cover, the following example is given:

Pencil roll cover composition Parts by weight;

Resin 100- Plasticizer 5'01"50' White lead' 1.5- Filler 20' Titanium dioxide 15 Carbon black 03 In the above example the resin will be selected from, the group consisting of polyvinyl chloride, the poly merization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl' acetate containing about vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl acetate, and mixtures thereof. The polyvinyl chloride resin may be one sold under the trade designation Koroseal. The polymerization product of the mixture vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate may be the resin sold under the trade designation VYNW, and the mixture may be any proportions of the resins. sold under the trade designations given above.

The plasticizer may be any one of the plasticizers for the resin listed below. The first three plasticizers are preferred. Of course, mixtures of the various plasticizers may be used.

Plastlcizer Trade Name Chemical Composition Butyl benzl sebacate. Capryl benzyl sebacate. 2-ethylhexyl di ester amide. Tributyl phosphate.

Triglycol dihexoete.

High M. W. Polyethe High M. W. Polyether ester Dioctyl styryl phosphonate.

Dibutyl benzene phosphonate.

Dioctyl benzene phosphonate.

Fatty acid nitrile of Ca-Czo fatty acids. Polyethylene glycol di-Z-ethylhexoate.

' Di (2-ethylbutyl Cellosolve) succinate.

Plasticizers l-10, 12, 14-16, and 18-21 are in class (a) mentioned previously, i. e., an ester, the acid component of which is selected from the group consisting of at least one aliphatic acid, phosphoric acid, and phosphonic acid, the molecular weight of the aliphatic portion of said ester representing more than 50% of the total molecular weight of said ester; plasticizer 11 is in class (b), Z-ethylhexyl di-ester amide; plasticizer 13 is in class (c), fatty acid nitrile of C C fatty acids; and plasticizer 17 is in class (d),

Plasticizers 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, l5, l6, and 18 are esters of an aliphatic acid and an aliphatic alcohol in which the aliphatic acid component of the ester has 2 to 18 carbon atoms and in which the aliphatic alcohol component of the ester has from 1 to 8 carbon atoms. Plasticizers 6 and 7 are linear polymerized esters of glycol and polycarboxylic acid. Any other plasticizer or mixture of plasticizers selected from classes (a) to (d) mentioned previously and which are compatible in proportions of about 50 to 150 parts for each 100 parts of resin (all parts by weight) at temperatures above F. may be employed so long as the plasticizer does not deleteriously affect the resin or so alter its physical characteristics as to render the working surface of the article unsatisfactory. The plasticizer or plasticizers selected will de pend upon the particular type of fiber working unit being prepared, the service conditions which it will encounter, and other variable factors. The quantity of plasticizer used will likewise depend upon such variable factors. For pencil roll covers the amount of plasticizer used will generally be determined by the hardness desired in the finished product and the static resistance of the working surface. With the plasticizers listed above, parts of plasticizer to 100 parts of resin will be adequate to secure static resistance in all instances except with linear polyester type plasticizer, No. 6, Where about 85 parts by weight of plasticizer to 100 parts of resin are required to provide a static-free working surface. Where this quantity of plasticizer tends to produce a product which is too resilient and yielding for specific uses, one of the other plasticizers such as plasticizer No. 1 listed above will be chosen. Wide latitude is possible in the selection of plasticizers.

A preferred filler is the one sold under the trademark Silene EF which is a precipitated calcium silicate. In place of Silene EF other fillers may be substituted, such as clay, whiting, and carbon black. Titanium dioxide and carbon black, such as Gastex," are used principally as color pigments, and in lieu thereof other pigments may be employed. The white lead serves as a heat stabilizer, and in place of it materials such as lead stearate, basic lead silicate, and the like may be substituted.

The quantities of the fillers, pigments, and stabilizers used may be varied and are not critical. These compounding ingredients are well known, and those skilled in the art will have no difficulty in compounding with various fillers, pigments, and stabilizers, as required.

In the preparation of the composition, the various ingredients are mixed in a suitable container or internal mixer. The blended ingredients are then fused on a heated two-roll mill, the temperature of which is in the order of 275 F. to 300 F. The fused compound is then extruded into tubular sections of the desired length. The extruded tubes are then permitted to cool and are subsequently cut into covers, aprons, or the like of the desired dimensions. Where roll covers are being fabricated, the covering may be mounted upon metal rolls, as shown in Figures 1 and 2 of the drawing, and the outer surface of the cover is ground to the desired diameter and surface smoothness.

A composition suitable for fabrication into aprons may be prepared as follows:

Apron composition Parts by weight Resin 100 Plasticizer 50-150 White lead 1.5 Titanium dioxide 15 Carbon black 0.3

Nos. 6 or 7 are used, for example, the quantity of plasticizer will be about parts by weight for each parts by weight of resin. Other plasticizers may be used in larger or smaller quantities within the range recited.

In the fabrication of the apron the mixing, fusing, and extruding steps will be the same as those mentioned above in connection with the pencil roll cover composition. The extruded tube will be as close as possible in dimensions to those required in the finished apron. The tube may then be mounted upon a mandrel having an outer diameter corresponding to the inner diameter of the apron being fabricated, and the assembly may then be heated in an oven at 250 F. for about one hour which will tend to anneal the composition. Thereafter, the tube will be severed into aprons of the desired dimensions; and if found necessary or desirable, the outer surface may be buffed or ground to provide a working sur-' face having the requisite texture.

Other textile fiber working units may be formed from the compositions of this invention; and while the compounding may vary to some extent with the various units, they will in all events include a working surface formed of a composition of a resin selected from the group consisting of polyvinyl chloride, the polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing about 95 vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl acetate, and mixtures thereof; and they will have incorporated therewith a plasticizer for the resin which renders the composition static-free and which is selected from the classes (a), (b), (c), and (d) above or mixtures of two or more thereof. As mentioned above, fillers, pigments, and stabilizing agents and the like may be incorporated. The proportioning of resin and plasticizer may vary but will fall within the range of 50 to 150 parts by weight of plasticizer for each 100 parts by weight of resin; and the plasticizer will, of course, be compatible with the resin in such proportions at all temperatures above 45 F. encountered in the use of the product.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application, Serial No. 148,719, filed March 9, 1950, now abandoned.

-I claim:

1. A textile fiber working unit having a static-free Working surface formed of a composition of a resin selected from the group consisting of vinyl chloride, the polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing about 95% vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl acetate, and mixtures thereof, having incorporated therewith between about 50 parts by weight and about 150 parts by weight for each 100 parts by weight of resin of a plasticizer for the resin which is compatible with the resin in such proportions at temperatures above 45 F. and which renders the composition static-free, said plasticizer being selected from the group consisting of: (a) an ester, the acid component of which is selected from the group consisting of at least one aliphatic acid, phosphoric acid, and phosphonic acid, the molecular weight of the aliphatic portion of said ester representing more than 50% of the total molecular Weight of said ester, (b) 2-ethylhexyl di ester amide, (0) fatty acid nitrile of C -C fatty acids, (d)

and (e) mixtures of two or more of the above plasticizers.

2. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the principal plasticizer for the resin is an ester of an aliphatic acid and an aliphatic alcohol.

3. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 2 in which the plasticizer consists principally of triethylene glycol ester of C -C fatty acids.

4. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 2 in which the plasticizer consists principally of polyester (linear).

5. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the principal plasticizer for the resin is an ester, the acid component of which is at least one aliphatic acid, the molecular weight of the aliphatic portion of said ester representing more than 50% of the total molecular weight of the ester.

6. A textile fiber Working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the principal plasticizer for the resin is an ester of phosphoric acid, the molecular weight of the aliphatic portion of said ester representing more than 50% of the total molecular weight of said ester,

7. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 6 in which the plasticizer consists principally of tributoxy ethyl phosphate.

8. A textile fiber Working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the principal plasticizer for the resin is a phosphonate, the molecular weight of aliphatic portion of which represents more than 50% of the total molecular weight of said phosphonate.

9. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the resin consists principally of the resinous polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing about vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl acetate.

10. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the resin consists principally of polyvinyl chloride.

11. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 2 in which the resin consists principally of the resinous polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing about 95 vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl acetate and in which the plasticizer consists principally of triethylene glycol ester of C -C fatty acids.

12. A textile fiber Working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the unit consists of a slip roll cover and in which the resin consists principally of the resinous polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing about 95 vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl aectate and in which the resin has incorporated therewith about 50 parts by weight of said plasticizer for each parts by weight of resin.

13. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the unit consists of a draft apron in which the resin consists principally of the resinous polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing about 95% vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl acetate.

14. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 1 in which the unit consists of a draft apron in which the resin consists principally of the resinous polymerization product of a mixture of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate containing about 95% vinyl chloride and about 5% vinyl acetate and in which said plasticizer for the resin is resistant to oil extraction.

15. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 2 in which the plasticizer consists principally of linear polymerized ester of glycol and polycarboxylic acid.

16. A textile fiber working unit in accordance with claim 2 in which the aliphatic acid component of the ester has 2 to 18 carbon atoms and in which the aliphatic alcohol component of the ester has from 1 to 8 carbon atoms.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,935,577 -Reid Nov. 17, 1933 2,010,963 Robertson Aug. 13, 1935 2,278,424 Campbell Apr. 7, 1942 2,597,708 Cresswell May 20, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 486,911 Great Britain June 13, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1935577 *May 17, 1928Nov 14, 1933Carbide & Carbon Chem CorpVinyl resin
US2010963 *Nov 22, 1933Aug 13, 1935Carbide & Carbon Chem CorpProcess for making films and the like and products thereby made
US2278424 *Jul 22, 1937Apr 7, 1942Sonoco Products CoCover for textile rolls and method of making the same
US2597708 *Dec 30, 1948May 20, 1952American Cyanamid CoAntistatic agent, treatment of shaped articles therewith, and treated articles
GB486911A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2996646 *Jan 9, 1957Aug 15, 1961Eastman Kodak CoAntistatic device
US3133884 *Aug 22, 1960May 19, 1964Monsanto ChemicalsCoating composition containing a liquid phosphate ester, a thermoplastic resin and asiliceous material
US4346145 *Jan 5, 1981Aug 24, 1982Western Electric Co., Inc.Fireproof covering of a polyvinyl chloride containing phosphate plasticizer
US4443573 *May 6, 1982Apr 17, 1984Allied CorporationAdditive dispersions and process for their incorporation with fiber-forming polymers
US4582867 *Jun 17, 1982Apr 15, 1986At&T Technologies, Inc.Coating composition and coated articles
US5198521 *Oct 29, 1991Mar 30, 1993Armstrong World Industries, Inc.Element for reducing static electricity in floors
US5620762 *Aug 10, 1994Apr 15, 1997Armstrong World Industries, Inc.Textile fiber-working units and compositions for their fiber-working surface layer
Classifications
U.S. Classification524/132, 524/310, 524/228, 524/208, 524/311, 524/378, 524/145, 524/563, 524/308
International ClassificationD06M13/288, D01H5/74, C08L27/06, D06M15/244, C08L67/02
Cooperative ClassificationD01H5/74, C08L27/06, D01H2700/245, D06M13/288, C08L67/02, D06M15/244
European ClassificationD01H5/74, C08L27/06, D06M13/288, D06M15/244