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Publication numberUS2860691 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1958
Filing dateFeb 24, 1955
Priority dateFeb 24, 1955
Publication numberUS 2860691 A, US 2860691A, US-A-2860691, US2860691 A, US2860691A
InventorsOrville S Caesar
Original AssigneeOrville S Caesar
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reclining chair for passenger vehicles
US 2860691 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES Filed Feb. 24, 1955 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR 2,850,691

RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES Filed Feb. 24, 1955 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 A36 1 V- 26 v J26 11/; I 25 5A 54 9 Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR 6 RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES Filed Feb. 24, 1955 v 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR RECLINING CHAIR FGR PASSENGER VEHICLES 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 24, 1955 1 tPl 15 IIII I'll/l I I r/// Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR 2,860,691

RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES Filed Feb. 24. 1955 s Sheets-Sheet s lIlli Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR 2,850,691

RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES Filed Feb. 24, 1955 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed Feb. 24, 1955 Nov. 18, 1958 o. s. CAESAR 2,850,691

RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES Filed Feb. 24, 1955 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 United States Patent RECLINING CHAIR FOR PASSENGER ,VEHICLES Orville S. Caesar, Barrington, Ill.

Application February 24, 1955, Serial No. 490,190

Claims; (Cl. 1551 16) The present invention relates to reclining chairs and more particularly to reclining chairs for passenger vehicles.

The pleasure of a bus trip, for example, is affected substantially by the overall seating comfort afforded by the chair occupied. The fact that a chairmay be comfortable at first is not sufficient. To serve the changing moods and desires of the passenger and to avoid passengerdiscomfort from sitting in. one. position, it is desirable that chairs; used in vehicular, service be adjustable between upright and reclining positions.

The prevent invention stems from a recognition that conventional reclining. chairs used in vehicles do not provide. the maximum possible. seating comfort. in all positions of adjustment because of imperfect angular relationships between the chair seats and: the chair backs. The common expedient of. adjustingthe inclination of the chair. back. while maintaining, the angular position of the chair seat fixed'creates a tendency, when the chair back is in a reclining position, to slide the occupant forwardly in the chair seat; This. tendency is not adequately offset by the fixed. rearward inclination of the seat unless the seat has so muchtilt as to be uncomfortable when the chair backis raised to its most nearly vertical position. Hence, the design. of such chairs is of necessity a matter ofcompromise in which sacrifice in seating comfort is' unavoidable.

Similar disadvantages are inherent in adjustable chairs in which a fixed angular relationship is maintained. be.- tweenthe chair seat and the chair back for. all positions of adjustment. Such chairs tend' to slide the. occupant forwardly or rearwardly on the chair seat in one or bothextreme positions of adjustment. Moreover, a

fixed relationship between the chair'seatand back does not provide relaxing changes inthe angular relationship between the legs and back of the occupant.

One object of the invention is to provide especially for use in passenger vehicles an improved reclining chair in which the angular positions of the chair seat and back are simultaneously adjusted and coordinated withrespectto each other in a novel manner to provide maximumseating comfortin allpositions of adjustment.

A more specific object is to provide an improved reclining chair of the character recited in which the angular positions of the chair seat and backv are adjusted independently by common linkage means of simple, serviceable construction which inherently coordinates the positions of the seat and back relative to each other for maximum seating comfort in every seating position. A related object is to provide in an economical, practical manner for power adjustment of the chair:

Another object is to provide a reclining chair of the above character having improved cushioning and upholstery structure which further increases-the comfort and serviceability of the chair.

Another object is to provide an improved chair which achieves the objects recited and at the same time makes "ice most efiicient use of high premium space on passenger vehicles.

An additional object is. to increase the seating comfort of the improved chair by the provision of optimum, below-the-knee leg support to the occupant.

Other objects. and advantages will become apparent from the following description of the exemplary forms of the invention illustrated in the drawings, in which:

Figure l is a perspective view showing a two-passenger chair embodying the invention positioned within a bus,

illustrated only in fragmentary form;

Fig. 2 is a verticalsectional view of the chair taken generally alongthe line. 2-2 of Fig. 1, the central portion of the cushioning structure. being slightly displaced from normal position to more clearly revealunderlying frame support structure;

Fig. 3' is a frontview with the cover removed of the chair structure for one passenger;

Fig. 4 is a front view similar to Fig 3, .with the chair padding removed and certain parts of' the supporting structure. broken away to expose underlying parts of the chair;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 4, with additional cushioning support structure. removed for clearness in illustration;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary perspective-viewof thechair structure of Fig. 5 viewedfrom therrear;

Fig. 7 is a simplified fragmentary sectional view, taken along the line 7--7 of Fig. 5, showing-one. position of movable chair frame structure in' solid linestand illustrating a more reclined position of thevsame" structure in phantom;

Fig. 8 isa. fragmentary plan view of the" structure shown in Fig. 7;

Fig. 9'is a fragmentary vertical sectionalview. of the seat frame support structure. at oneforward. corner of the chair;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary sectional'view taken along the broken line 10--10 of Fig. 9;

Fig.1 11 is afragmentary vertical sectional view-taken generally along the line 1111 in Fig. 5;.

Fig. l2is a diagrammatic view of the chair framing for a single passenger, showing-one position ofthe adjustable frame structure in solid lines and illustrating a more reclined position of the same structure in phantom;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of chair seat structure embodying an additionalfeature of theinvention; i. e., a calf rest shown in solid-lines in operative position and illustrated in phantom in inoperative position; i

Fig. 14 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View showing in solid lines the operativesposition'of'the calf rest support and illustrating the inoperative position of the same structure in phantom;

Fig. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view taken. along the line 15-15 of Fig. 14; and

Fig. 16 is a fragmentary vertical sectional: Vi6W,I par tially broken away for clearness in illustration, of chair structure embodyinga modified form of the invention.

The first embodiment of the invention isa two-pas senger chair 10 for use in a bus or similar vehicle 12 as shown in Fig. 1. In general, the chaircomprises independently adjustable seat and back structure l3 for each passenger mounted side by side on a stationary frame 14.

The specific construction of the frame 14 can be adapted to the support structure available in different vehicles. As shown, the frame 14 comprises a'forward support 16 and a rear support 18. on each side of the chair extending downwardly in spreading relation to vehicle floor 22. The medial portion of each support member 16 is connected with the medial portion of the adjacent support 18 by a generally horizontal frame member 24, Figs. 2, 5, 6, and 11. The frame member 24 on the aisle side of the chair is .concealed between the supports 16, 18 by a vertical masking plate 25, Figs. 1 and '2, which extends downwardly below the frame member. .A similar plate 27 extending rearwardly from the support 18 complements the plate 25 in concealing supporting elements of the adjacent seating structure 13. i

The two forward frame support members 16 at opposite sidesof the chair are connected by a cross rail 26 located slightly below the forward ends of the frame members 24. Transverse framing at the rear of the chair is provided by a seat and back support tube 29 connected atopposite ends to two brackets 31, Figs. 2 and 11, fixed to the respective rear supports 18 near the rear ends of the frame members 24.

Except for the common support provided by the frame 14, the chair seat and back structures 13 for the two passengers are generally independent thoughsimilar to 4 support arm pivots 60, which distance, in turn, is somewhat greater than the spacing of the support arm pivots 60 from the axis of the rocker 48.

From its pivotal connection 68 to the back frame 34, each link 66 extends forwardly to a pivotal support 70 on the stationary chair frame 14.

The pivotal supports 70 at opposite sides of the chair 10 are mounted in ears 71, Fig. 11, on the brackets 31.

1 Two-passenger chairs like the one shown are equipped each other. Hence, the following description of the seating structure 13 for one passenger will sufiice for both.

In general, each seating structure 13 comprises an adjustable chair seat 28 and an adjustable chair back 30 extending upwardly from the rear end of the seat. The height of the chair back is sufficient to provide a head rest 31 for the occupant.

In accordance with the invention, a frame 32 for the seat 28 and a frame 34 for the back 30, Figs. 2, 4 and 5, are independently supported on the stationary frame 14 and simultaneously adjusted between various reclining and straight chair positions by integrated support and adjusting linkages which vary the angular relationship between-the two movable frames to, provide the maximum seating comfort in all positions of adjustment. I The seat frame 32 comprises a pair of hollow rectangular side rails 36 connected at their forward ends by a cross bar 38, Figs. 5 and 9. The forward portion of the seat frame is movably supported by a pair of links 40 pivotally connected at one end 42 within the respective side rails 36 and extending downwardly to pivotal supports 44 on a pair of transversely spaced, rearwardly extending brackets 46 on the frame member 26, Figs. 6 to 10.

The rear end of the seat frame 32 is adjustably supported on a transverse rocker member 48 journaled on the transverse tube 29 of the stationary chair frame 14. As shown, the rocker member 48 comprises a cylindrical sleeve (also denoted by the numeral 48). Two generally similar bellcrank-shaped brackets 52 are centrally fixed to the rocker sleeve 48 in alignment along the sleeve with the seat frame side rails 36, Figs. 5, 7 and 8.

The two brackets 52 together form a first pair of radial arms 54, Figs. 5, 7 and 12, extending upwardly and forwardly from the sleeve 48. The outer ends of the arms 54 are pivotally connected at 58 to the bifurcated rear ends of the respective seat frame rails 36.

The brackets 52 also form a second pair of rocker arms 59 extending rearwardly from the sleeve 48 at an obtuse angle to the respective arms 54. The arms 59 preferably are somewhat longer than the arms 54. The outer ends of the arms 59 are pivotally connected at 60 respectively to adjustable brackets 61 in the lower ends of two generally parallel side members 62 ofthe chair back frame 34. See Figs. 5, 7, and 8. The back frame members 62 are connected at their upper ends by a transverse member 64.

Additional support for the chair back frame 34 is provided by a pair of links 66 pivoted at one end 68 to the respective back frame members 62 above the pivotal connections 60 between the latter and the rocker arms 59. As shown in Fig. 7, the length of the links 66 is somewhat greater than the distance along the respective back frame members 62 between the link pivots 6.8 and t with a central frame member 72, Figs. 6, 7 and 8, connected at the forward end to the cross rail 26 and supported near the rear end by the tube 29. Fashioned preferably from sheet metal, the frame member 72 has a pair of upwardly extending ears 74 located over the shaft 29 which support a common pivot 70 for the two adjacent chair back links 66.

The seating structure 13 for each occupant is adjusted toward and away from its extreme reclining position upon angular displacement or rotation of the rocker 48 in opposite-directions. The manner in which this common support and adjusting structure for the seat frame 32 and the back frame 34 coordinates the relative positions of these two frames for maximum seating comfort in all positions will be more fully described in connection with the: improved cushioning structure suspended between the frames.

The rocker 48 is rotated to shift the seating structure: 13 in the desired direction by a power operated adjusting linkage mounted on the stationary frame 14 below the seat 28. As shown in Figs. 7 and 8, the linkage provided for this purpose includes a downwardly extending radial. arm 76 fixed to the rocker sleeve 48 adjacent one of the: brackets 52. The free end of the arm 76 is pivoted at 78 to the rear end of an operating tube 80. An antifriction nut 82 of conventional construction, which is shown as being of the recirculating ball type, is fixed to the forward end of the tube 80 and receives an operating screw 84 which projects forwardly of the nut. The for-- ward end of the screw 84 is connected to and driven by a speed reducing gear assembly 86 swingably supported on a pair of brackets 88 attached to the frame rail 26. Thegear assembly 86 is operated to turn the screw 84 in either direction by a reversing electric motor 90, Figs. 4- and 7, mounted at one side of the assembly. The gear assembly 86, screw 84, nut 82, and tube together form a jack mechanism which is elongated and shortened by operation of the motor in opposite directions, thus acting through the arm 76 to turn the rocker 48 about its axis.

The reversing motor 90 is controlled through electrical leads 92 extending up through the adjacent (hollow) frame support member 16 to a reversing switch 94 in the forward end of the arm rest 20. This switch is conventional and has forward and backward operating positions and is spring loaded to a central off position. Thus the occupant has merely to push the switch 94 in one direction or the other to adjust the seating structure 13 as desired. Power to the motor circuit is supplied from the vehicle in any suitable manner.

The seating structure 13 for each passenger includes a cushion assembly supported on both the seat frame 32 and the back frame 34. The seat frame 32 projects a substantial distance forward of the stationary support frame 14, Fig. 2. To this forwardly projecting portion of the seat frame is attached a transverse upholstery or cushion support plate 96 which extends along the side rails 36 from the cross bar 38 substantially to the frame 14. Preferably, the upholstery plate has a slight upwardly convex curvature as shown in Figs. 2 and 9.

Similarly, the upper end of the back frame 34 supports a slightly concave cushion support plate 98 which extends downwardly a substantial distance along the forward edge of the side members 62 from the cross member 64.

Between the seat plate 96 and the back plate 98, the cushion assembly is supported by a broad, flexible web 100, Figs. 2 and 4, connected at one end to a transverse yieldab'le support 1'02 at the rear edge. of; the seat plate 96. and connected at the other end to a. similar support 104 at the lower edge of the back plate 98'. Suspended between the two supports 102 and 104, the web 100 has a. length such. that the web normally extends donwwardly and forwardly from the back support 104 at a slight angle to the back frame 34 andre'arwardly from the seat support 102 at a slightly upwardly inclined angle to the seat frame 32; The downwardly and the rearwardly extending portions of the web 100 merge in a gentle bend 106 at the apex of the seat and back structures. For the purpose of. illustration, the web 100 (particularly the bend I06) isdisplaced' outwardly, and upwardly from its normal position in Fig. 2' to more clearly-reve'alunderlying support structure of the chair.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 9,.the support 102 for the seat end. of the web 100 is formed by'atransverse bar (also denoted by the. numeral 102) connected at. opposite ends to the rear ends of two stems 107,. which. extend forward- 1y through elongated apertured brackets 108 on the respective seat rails 36. Coiled tension springs 110 connected between. the forward ends of the respective stems 107 and the seat frame cross-bar 38 exert. strong yield"- able forces through the. stems. tending to hold the web support 102 against the rear. ends. of the brackets 108.

The support 104 for the chair back end of the web 100 has a similar construction comprising, a cross-bar (also denoted by the numeral 104) urged upwardly by strong tension. springs 112 connected between the back frame 34 and stems 114 extending through: apertured brackets 116 on the back frame to support opposite ends of the cross-bar, Figs. 2, 4 and S.

It will be noted. that the mounting structure for the Web supports 102' and 10.4 is disposed largely in underlying relation to the adjacent upholstery plates 96 and 98. To facilitate easy removal and replacement of the web 100,, opposite ends of the web are extended around the respective supports 102 and 104 and attached to the adjacent end segments of theweb by snaps118. A number of snaps 118i spaced. longitudinally along the chair back end of the web provide for easy adjustment of theeffective web length. 7

An auxiliary web support plate 119, Figs. 2 and 5, having a concave shape as viewed from the front of the chair, is fixed at opposite ends to the chair back members 62 at a substantial distance below the plate 98.

A continuous shaped pad 120 of foam rubber, Figs. 2 and 3, projects somewhat forwardly of the seat frame 32. and extends rearwardly over the seat plate 96, the web 100, and the back plate'98 to an upper terminus 121 turned over the upper-end of the back frame 34. A portion of the pad 120 at the upper end of the chair back 30 is thickened to formthe previously mentioned head rest31.

The rear side of the chair back frame 34 is covered by a sheet metal plate 123 secured to both side frame members 62 and extending downwardly from the cross member 64 substantially to the lower end of theback frame, Fig. 2. The upper end'of the pad 120 is anchored to the plate 98' by flexible ties 122, Fig. 2, extending through both the rear plate 123 and the pad just below the headrest 31. Another set of ties 125 is used to secure the bend 106 in the web 100 to the overlying segment of the pad 120.

A sock-like, fitted cover 124 of a suitable upholstery material is slipped downwardly over the back 30, surrounding the back substantially to its lower end; From the lower end of the back 30, a portion of the cover 124 continues forwardly to cover the seat 28. Flaps 126 integral with opposite longitudinal sides. of the portion of the cover overlying the seat are fastened together below the seat frame.

Another flap 132 on the forward end of the cover I24 is turned under theproj'ecting end ofthe seal frame 32. A cross-bar 13'4 reinforcing the extreme end of the 6 flap132' is connected by a pair of tension springs 136 and a flexible web 138, Fig, 2, to another bar 137 used in fastening a lower edge of the cover to the lower edge of the back plate 123. The tension thus supplied by the springs 136 to the cover 124 through the forward flap 132 assures snug, neat fitting of the cover at all times.

As will be more fully explained presently, the cushion assembly thus supported on both the seat frame 32 and the back frame 34, cooperates with the support and adjusting linkages for the seat and back frames to provide maximum seating comfort in all positions of adjustment. Moreover, adjustment of the seating structure from one position to another does not disturb the passenger.

It is fitting, therefore, to review the manner in which the common chair seat and back support and adjusting structure operates to properly position the seat and back frame 32, 34 in relation to each other for maximum seating comfort in all positions of adjustment.

An extreme raised or straight chair position of the seat and back frame linkages of the seating structure 13 for asingle passenger is shown in solid lines in the diagrammatic view of Fig. 12 and in the framentary view of Fig. 7. In this position, the seat frame 32 is inclined rearwardly and downwardly at a slight angle to the horizontal'. The chair back frame 34 extends upwardly and rearwardly at a small angle to the vertical.

When the seat frame 32 is in this position, its forward support links extend upwardly and rearwardly from the stationary support pivots 44 at an angle to a vertical plane through the pivots. On the other hand, the rocker arms 54 supporting the rear end of the seat frame 32, extendupwardly and forwardly from the axis of the rock.- er 48" at an angle to a vertical plane through the rocker axis.

The seating structure 13 is adjusted. to an extreme reclining position (indicated in phantom in Figs. 12 and 7) by swinging the arm 76 and the rocker 48 in the clockwise direction, as viewed in Figs. 7 and 12. This swings the outer ends of the rocker arms 54 (attached to the rear end of the seat frame 32') forwardly and downwardly. The downward component of the swinging movement of the arms lowers the rear end of the seat frame. The forward component of the arm movement carries the seat frame 32 forwardly, swinging the links 40 forwardly. Due to the initial rearward inclination of the links 40, forward swinging movement of the upper ends of the links has an upward component which raises the forward end of the seat frame. The overall result is to increase the rearward tilt or inclination of the seat frame 32 as it is carried forwardly by swinging movement of the rocker 48. i

The degree to which this rearward tilting movement of the seat frame 32 is effected by a given angular displacement of the rocker 48 is determined by the dimensional relationships of a four bar linkage system comprising the seat frame 32, the supporting links 40 at the forward end of the frame, the stationary frame 14, and the rocker arms 54 supporting the rear end of the seat frame. The relative dimensions of these basic components of the four bar seat support are determined in accordance with conventional principles of kinematics to produce the exact movement of the seat frame 32 desired.

The chair back 30 is supported and adjusted by a four bar linkage system comprising the stationary frame 14, the rocker arms 59 supporting the lower end of the back frame 34, the back frame 34 and the links 66.

When the chair back frame 34 is in the position shown in solid lines in Figs. 7 and 12, the links 66 extend rearwardly and downwardly at an angle to a horizontal plane through the pivots 70. At the sametime the rocker support arms 59 extend rearwardly and upwardly at a slight angle to a horizontal plane passing through the axis of the rocker 48.

Hence, upon swinging of the rocker 48 in the clockwise direction, Figs. 7 and 1 2, to adjust, theseat 28 toward a vzontal position.-

tions of adjustment.

reclining position as just described, the outer ends of arms 59 and the lower end of the back frame 34 are swung upwardly and forwardly. The upward component of the movement of the lower end of the back frame 34 swings the links 66 upwardly. Due to the initial rearward and downward inclination of the links 66, upward swinging creasing ratio of the horizontal component to the vertical component of the swinging movement of the outer ends of the arms 59 with continued rotation of the rocker 48 in the same direction completely offsets the change in direction of the horizontal component of vertical swinging movement of the links 66 as the links pass through a hori- Hence, continued swinging movement of the rocker 48 in the same direction, after the links 66 are swung vertically past a horizontal position, continues to increase the rearward inclination of the chair back 30.

The degree of tilting movement of the back frame 34 for a given angular displacement of the rocker 48, which also adjusts the seat frame 32 can be varied, as desired, by changing the relative dimensions of components of the previously described four-bar back support linkage in accordance with standard principles of kinematics.

Thus, even though the seat frame 32 and the back frame 34 are adjusted simultaneously by means of the common rocker structure 48, the degrees of angular ad- .justment of the seat frame and the back frame are determined separately for each frame by the design of the supporting linkages for the respective frames.

Put another Way, the interconnected seat and back support linkages provide for simultaneous adjustment of both the seat frame 32 and the back frame 34 in the same angular direction while at the same time providing for a variation in the angular relationship between the seat frame and the back frame to afford optimum seating comfort in all positions of adjustment. Hence, the attitudes of the chair seat 28 and back 30 are properly related to each other for ideal seating comfort in all posi- In this connection it will be noted with reference to Fig. 12 that the seat frame 32 in moving from its position represented by a solid line to the more reclined position represented in phantom is turned through a substantially smaller angle than is the back frame 34 in moving between its corresponding positions represented respectively by solid and phantom lines.

The simultaneous tilting movements of the seat and back frames 32, 34 as the chair is adjusted from upright to reclining positions increases the spacing between the connections of opposite ends of the web 100 to the medial portions of the seat and back frames respectively. This has a tendency to reduce or flatten the curvature of the bend 106 in the web as the rearward inclination of the seat and back frames is increased. In this manner the shaping of cushioning means suspended on the web 100 is coordinated with the various-angular altitudes of the seat and back frames to provide optimum seating comfort in all positions of chair adjustment without disturbing the occupant as the chair is adjusted from one position to another.

As previously mentioned, adjustment of the chair to any desired position requires merely operation of the three-position switch 94 mounted on the adjacent chair arm 20. The supporting linkages for the seat and back frames operate in the manner described to vary the angular relationships between the two simultaneously adjusted frames for maximum seating comfort in every position of the seating structure.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 6, an adjustable foot rest 139 of conventional construction is mounted on the back of the chair immediately to the rear of each seating structure 13 for the convenience of passengers seated immediately rearward of the chair shown.

I "An additional feature of the invention is illustrated in Figs. 13, 14 and 15. To provide even greater seating comfort to an occupant of the chair, each seating structure 13 can be equipped with a calf rest swingably connected at one end to the outer end of the seat frame 32, which is modified-slightly to accommodate the calf rest.

For simplicity, only the framing and support structure for the calf rest 140 are shown. The calf rest comprises a rectangular sheet metalframe 142 approximately equal in width to the seat frame 32. Fashioned from a generally flat sheet of metal, the frame 142 is reinforced by its marginal edges 144, turned at right angles to the main plane of the plate.

Two swingable support members 146 for the calf rest are pivotally supported by hinge pins 148 in the forward ends of the respectiveseat frame members 36 and attached by welding or otherwise to the adjacent side edge of the calf rest frame 142.

For use, the calf rest 140 is swung manually forwardly and upwardly from a vertical, inoperative position to an inclined position (shown in solid lines in Figs. 13 and 14), which provides optimum below-the-knee support to the legs of an occupant of the seating structure. The calf rest is yieldably held in this position by a very simple toggle linkage 150 duplicated at opposite sides of the seat frame 32'.

Housed largely within the hollow seat frame member 36 at the adjacent side of the seat frame 32, each toggle linkage 150, Fig. 14, comprises a first link 152 connected at one end by a pivot 154 to the adjacent calf rest support .146 and at the other end by a pivot 156 to a downwardly offset lug 158 on the forward end of a second link 160.

The rear end of the second link 160 is connected by a pivot 162 with a short plunger member 164 slidablyposi- .tioned in the forward end of a forwardly open bore 166 in the lower side of a plug 168 fixed in the associated seat frame member 36 by a plurality of transverse pins 170. The plunger 164 is shaped to press against the forward end of a coiled compression spring 172 bearing against the bottom of the bore 166.

Each toggle linkage 150 is biased toward an upper, operative position by a tension spring 174 connected between the link 160 and an overlying portion of the seat frame rail 36. Upward movement of the toggle linkage is limited, however, after the pivot 156 between the two toggle links has moved vertically past a straight center line between the pivots 154 and 162, by engagement of a forwardly extending portion of the lug 158 on the link 160 with the underside of a double ended cam 176.

As shown in Figs. 14 and 15, the cam 176 is nonrotatably fixed by a pin 178 to a transverse control shaft 180, which extends horizontally across the seat frame 32, passing through both seat frame members 36. A earn 176 is attached to the shaft 180 within each seat frame member 36.

When the calf rest 140 is manually swung outwardly to the operative position shown in solid lines in Fig. 13, the tension spring 174 for each over-center toggle linkage 150 pulls the linkage upwardly to an operative position in which it rests against the adjacent cam 176 as previously explained, to hold the calf rest against downward swinging movement. However, in the event a passenger should apply abnormally strong downward or rearward force to the calf rest 140, while it is in operative position, the springs 172 will yield under the forces transmitted from the toggle linkages 150. This, of course, allows the calf rest to swing downwardly temporarily to an out-of-the-way position.

The yieldability of the support structure which holds the calf rest 140 in extended position minimizes the likelihood of a passenger tripping over the calf rest when walking around the front of the seating structure 13 of a twopassenger chair adjacent the aisle of the vehicle in mov- 9 ing towardlor away from seating structure adjacent the vehicle window.

When use of the calf rest 140 is not desired, the toggle linkages 150 are disabled, allowing the calf rest to swing downwardly to a vertical, inoperative position, indicated in phantomin Figs. 13" and 14. Disabling of the support linkages 150 is effected by rotating the control shaft 180 by means of a handle 182 attached to one end of the shaft.

Rotation of the shaft 1 80causes one of the two projections. 184 on each cam 176 to force the adjacent toggle link 160 downwardly sufficiently to carry the connecting pivot 156 between the links 152, 160 downwardly pasta center line through the pivots 154, 162. The weight of the calf rest 140 then scissors the toggle linkages 150 downwardly againstthe forces: of. the springs 174 to the position indicated in phantom in Fig. 14, which corresponds to the inoperative or vertical position of the calf rest;

The frame and" adjusting structure of a chair embodying a modified form ofthe invention is illustratedin the fragmentary sectional View of Fig. 16. In general, the chair structure of this modified form of the invention differs from that previously described by the substitution of manual chair adjusting means in place of the power adjusting means of thefirst form of the invention.

The basic similarity in the, structure of the two chairs embodying the two illustrated forms of the invention permits considerable simplification in the description of the modifiedform of Fig. 16; Hence, structural components of the modifiedembodiment of the invention corresponding to those of the first embodiment are designated with the, same reference numerals with the addition of the subscript a.

The chair embodying the modified form of the invention, Fig. 16, is adjusted between different positions by manual force applied to either the seat 28a or the back 30a or both. The chair is locked in various positions of adjustment by a manually controlled detent arrangement which holds the rocker 48a against rotation.

In the preferred construction shown, a holding pawl 200 is pivotally mounted on a bracket 202 fixed to the rear stationary frame support member 18a adjacent the supporting ear 71a for the adjacent back supporting link 66a. A spring 204 anchored to a bracket 206 on the masking plate 25a engages the back side of the pawl 200, urging the pawl downwardly and rearwardly to engage a tooth 207 on the free end of the pawl with a serrated sector 208 formed on the widened free end of the adjacent rocker arm 54a, which supports the rear end of the seat frame 32a.

To disengage the pawl 200 from the sector 148, manual force is applied to the upper end of a bell crank control lever 210 protruding outwardly from the forward upper edge of the adjacent frame support member 16a. The medial portion of the lever 210 is supported on a pivot 212 in the member 16a. A connecting link 214 is pivoted at one end to the rear end of the lever 210 within the frame support 16a and at the other end of the link to one corner of a triangular rocker 216. A second corner of the rocker 216 is supported on a pivot 218 within the frame member 116. The third corner of the rocker 216 is connected by a link 220 to the free end of the pawl 200.

The arrangement of the linkage is such that inward movement of the protruding end of the operating lever 210 serves to retract the pawl tooth 207 out of operative engagement with the sector 208 to free the rocker 48a for adjustment of the chair in the manner described. Upon release of the lever 210, the spring 204 is again free to engage the pawl 200 with the sector 208 upon alignment of a recess in the sector with the pawl tooth 207.

Manual adjustment of the chair between different positions is facilitated by the counterbalancing action of a tension spring 222 connected between a lug 224 on the lower rear end of the seat frame member 36a and the '10. p pivotal connection 68!: between the link 66a and'tlie ad'- jacent back frame member 62a. 1

While I have shown and described preferred embodi ments of my invention, it will be apparent that numerous variations and modifications thereof may be made without departing from the underlying principles and scope offthe invention. I therefore desire, by the following claims, to include all! such variations and modifications by which substantially the results of my invention may be obtained through the use of substantially the same or equivalent means.

I claim:

1. An adjustable chair suitable for use in passenger vehicles, comprising, in combination, a support frame, a transverse rocker journaled on a rear portion of said frame, means for holding said rocker in various positions of angular adjustment about the axis thereof, seatsupport means on said rocker extending radially from the axis thereof, a chair seatframe supported at the rear end thereof on said rocker seat support means and extending forwardly along said support frame, means on said'support frame movably supporting the forward portion of said; seatfframe, said rocker includingback support means extending radially from the axis thereof, a chair back frame pivotallyconnected to saidrocker back support means and extending upwardly generally from the rear end of said seat frame, means on said support frame articulated with said back frame in spaced relation to the connection thereto of, said rocker back support means, a transverse cushion supporton theforward end of said seat frame, a transverse cushion support on the upper end of said back frame, a cushion. support web connected at opposite ends to the medialportions of said seat frame and said back frame respectively and suspended therebetween; and cushioning means supported on said seat frame cushion support, said web, and said back frame cushion support.

2. An adjustable chair suitable for use in passenger vehicles, comprising, in combination, a support frame, a chair seat extending from front to rear on said frame, link means swingably connected between said frame and the forward end of said seat to provide movable support to the latter, transverse rocker means journaled on said frame adjacent the rear end of said seat and including seat support means extending radially from the axis of the rocker arm and pivotally connected to the rear end of the seat, a chair back extending upwardly from the rear end of said seat, said rocker means including back support means extending radially from the axis of the rocker means and attached to said back in radially spaced relation to the rotary axis of the rocker means, link means swingably connected between said frame and said back in spaced relation to the connection with the latter of said back support means of said rocker means, said rocker means including a radial arm thereon, a screw and nut actuator connected with the free end of said arm, and a seat adjusting motor drivingly connected with said screw and nut actuator for swinging said rocker means in either direction for adjusting said chair seat and back simultaneously.

3. An adjustable chair suitable for use in passenger vehicles, comprising, in combination, a support frame, a chair seat extending from front to rear on said frame, link means swingably connected between said frame and the forward end of said seat to provide movable support to the latter, transverse rocker means journaled on said frame generally below the rear end of said seat and including seat support means pivotally connected to said seat in radially spaced relation to the axis of the rocker means, detent means connected with said rocker means for locking the latter in various selected angular positions, manual release means connected with said detent means for controllably disengaging the latter, a chair back extending upwardly from the rear end of said seat, said rocker means including back support means pivotal- 1y connected to said chair back in radially spaced relation to the axis of said rocker means, and link means swingably connected between said frame and said chair back in spaced relation to the connection with the latter of said back supportmeans of said rocker means.

4. In an adjustable chair, the combination of a support frame, a movable chair seat frame extending from front to rear on said support frame, a 'movable chair back frame structurally separate from said seat frame and extending upwardly from the rear thereof, seat support means on said support frame movably supporting said seat frame and including seat adjusting means connected with said seat frame to adjust on the support frame the position of the seat frame relative to said back frame, back support means on said support frame movably supporting said chair back frame and including back adjusting means connected with said back frame to adjust on the support frame the position of the back frame relative to said seat frame, coordinating means connecting said seat adjusting means and said back adjusting means 2 to produce a relative displacement between adjacent ends of said seat and back frames as an incident to adjustment of said seat and back frames on said support frame,

a'transverse cushion support on the forward end of said seat frame, a transverse cushion support on the upper end of said back frame, a first web support mounted on said seat frame rearwardly of said cushion support thereon, a second web support mounted on said back 3 frame downwardly of said cushion support thereon, one

5. In an adjustable chair the combination of a support base, a chair seat frame extending from front to rear on said base, a chair back frame structurally separate from said seat frame and extending upwardly from the rear thereof, a chair adjusting linkage connected to'one of said frames to effect a relative displacement between adjacent ends of said respective frames and simultaneously adjust the angular relationship between the two frames, a transverse cushion support on the forward end of said seat frame, a transverse cushion support on the upper end of said back frame, a flexible support web suspended between the medial portion of said seat frame and the medial portion of said back frame, and cushioning means supported on said web and on said transverse cushion supports.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 129,423 Perry July 16, 1,987,940 Levine Jan. 15, 1935 2,028,633 Thomas Jan. 21, 1936 2,050,658 Holt Aug. 17, 1936 2,126,098 Ducrot Aug. 9, .1938 2,284,129 Caesar May 26, 1942 2,300,561 Ferreira Nov. 3,1942 2,335,234 Caesar et a1. Nov. 30, 1943 2,355,635 Dubilier Aug. 15, 1944 2,421,851 Rivard et a1. June 10, 1947 2,497,395 Cramer, Sr. Feb. 14, 1950 2,559,127 Lyon July 3, 1951 2,633,181 Bell Mar. 31, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS France Dec. 7, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent Nol. $60,691 November 18, 1958 Orville S Caesar It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1, line 26, for prevent" read we present column 5,

line 5, for "donwwardlw read downwardly column 10, line 46, for "arm" read means Signed and sealed this 24th day of February 1959.

SEAL) ttest:

KARL H AXLINE ROBERT C. WATSON Attesting Oflicer Commissioner of Patents

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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/322, 297/218.5, 297/423.15, 297/DIG.100, 297/423.26
International ClassificationB61D33/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D33/0021, Y10S297/01
European ClassificationB61D33/00B2B