Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2861735 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1958
Filing dateJun 4, 1956
Priority dateJun 4, 1956
Publication numberUS 2861735 A, US 2861735A, US-A-2861735, US2861735 A, US2861735A
InventorsWilliam G Faltin
Original AssigneeWilliam G Faltin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag-like receptacle
US 2861735 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 25, 1958 w. s. FALTIN I BAG-LIKE RECEPTACLE 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed June 4, 1956 V INVENTOR. William ErTfllfin A 7 TURNE Y Nov. 25, 1958 w. e. FALTlN BAG-LIKE RECEPTACLE 2 Shets-Sheec 2 Filed June 4, 1956 INVENTORQ BY William ErTalTin Arrow tacles as well as .thenuisance andinconvenience of-h whereby, .upon the "receptacle, becoming filled wise-needingto hedisposed ofa'nd replaced .b ,a'neyv United States Patent BAG-LIKE RECEPTACLE William G; Faltin, York, Pa. Application June 4, 1956, Serial No. 589,032 6 Claims. (Cl. 22953) This invention relates to a bag-like receptacle but, more particularly, to a bag-like receptacle normally stored in substantially fiat condition and including adhesivearrangements by which said receptacle maybe quickly and easily attached by said adhesive means to a surface from which the receptacle is suspended for support by said surface. i 7

There are many places and locations where it is highly desirable to use a bag-like receptacle, particularly'for purposes of receiving trash, refuse and the like. For example, rather than throw litter and waste material from moving vehicles while traversing highways, the countryside would be much neater if litter and refuse were not thrown from the vehicles but rather were placed within a suitable litter receptacles within the vehicle.

There also are many household applications for receptacle s of this type for holding refuse as well as other types of material. While waste baskets frequently are used for this purpose, waste baskets have to be emptied periodically and also occupy otherwise useful space on a floor. If a litter receptacle in .the nature of a suitable bag were held against the wall for example of a bath room, kitchen, or the like, as well as in rooms of doctors oflices, wash rooms and toilets .of ofiice buildings, service stations and the like, it would only be necessary for an attendant to quickly detach from the supporting wall the partly or completely filledreceptacle and place the same either in an incinerator or a conventional trash can. Said receptacle then would be replaced by a new receptacle. The construction and material used in such receptacles is insignificant and hence such receptacles readily are adapted for single use so they may be discarded when filled and replaced by a new receptacle.

In addition to the foregoing suggested uses, hospitals, sick rooms, nurseries, and the likealso would find use of such receptacles to be very handy and convenient. Certain types of receptacles are available for uses of this kind but many of them are the type which have .to' be emptied and they actually comprise nothing more than small, supported waste baskets. Various typesof supporting fittings which are somewhat costly are employed to support them either from a wall, the .endoffabench or sink, from a door, or from the side of afbed in'tjhe hospital for example. Due to the .cost,of. these lrecepaving to empty and replace the receptacle-upon -its. supporting means, such type of receptacle has not lent itself to being adapted to as wide a use as ltheylmi ghtfbe .if the cost were lower and the-ease of ,use were';greater.

The principal object of the present inventionisltopi ovide a preferably bag-like.receptacle which may .be formed from, any suitable material, preferably:moisturepi oof, and adhesive means, preferably pressure s ensitivje or similar in function thereto, are lutili'zed for detachably securing the receptacle-.to a suitable supporting isurfaee therone, the filled receptacle easily may be detached from 2,861,735 ented N v, 2 9.

ice

2 the supporting surface and discarded along with the refuse contained therein.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a bag-like receptacle having the foregoing characteristics which preferably normally is stored in flat. condition and the portions of the receptacle to which an adhesive coating has been applied effectively are protecteduntil the receptable i s to' be used by being adheringly but detachably attached to a supporting surface. As an adj unct to this object, it is intended in one of the preferred constructions of the invention that a coating of adhesive material be applied to desired portions of a receptacle of this type and the receptacle then is folded so .85 to have a portion thereof lightly adhere to and coverth'e adhesive previously applied to the receptacle, such folding not only protecting the adhesive but also rendering the receptacle smaller in size so that it may be stored;more readily until ready for use such as for example in the glove compartment of a vehicle.

Many arrangements for f lding such receptacles are possible and some of the more preferable of these are illustrated in the drawings comprising a part of this application. Further, the invention is applicable'to various kinds of bag-like receptacles including either so-called flat type or gusseted type and many types of materials are suitable for making such receptacles such as various forms of .sheeted synthetic resins, numerous kinds'of paper sheets including so-called parchment-like paper, oiled papers, kraft papers, and wet-strength papers. It is to be understood however that the invention'is not restricted to the use of these types of materials inasmuch as any other suitable types may be .uscd.

Details of the foregoing objects and of the invention, as well as other objects thereof, are set forth in the following specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings comprising a part-thereof.

In the drawings: t

Fig. 1 is a rear elevation of a flat bag-like receptacle having. a restricted coating of adhesive aflixed thereto in accordance with the principles of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the receptacle shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the receptacle illustrated in Fig. 1 folded upon itself along a single fold line.-

Figs. 4 and 5 respectively illustrate reverse foldings of the receptacle shown in Fig. 1 along'plural linesLof foldso as to dispose the receptacle into compact arrangement comprising three portions folded upon each other and detachably secured in such positions by the adhesive material afiixed to the receptacle.

Figs. 6 and 7 respectively comprise rearand .side elevations of a receptacle similar to that shown in Figs. 1 and 2 but in which the adhesive material and surface of the receptacle to be engaged thereby are arranged differently than in Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 8 is a rear elevation of a receptacle slightly different from that shown in Figs. 1 and 6 and including a flap extending from' one wall of the receptacle.

.9 is a side elevation of the receptacle shown in Fig. .8 when the flap is extended in the same. plane as the receptacle wall to which his attachedQ Fig. 10 is a view-similar to Fig. 9 but showing the flap folded backwardly upon the receptacle so as to protect the adhesive material when not in use. V

Fig. 11 is a sideelevation of the receptacle shown in Fig. 8 but illustrating the same folded substantially intermediately 0f the length thereof so as to dispose the ad hesive coating in lightly adhering and protective relationship against one surface of the lower end of the receptacle.

,Figs. 12 and 13 are side elevations similar to Fig. 11 but showing the body of the receptacle folded along a slightly different line from that shown in Fig. 11 and arranged with the flap folded respectively in two different directions relative to the bottom end of the receptacle so as-to hold the receptacle folded and also protect the adhesive coating on the flap.

Figs. 14 and 15 illustrate a receptacle similar to that shown in Figs. 8 and 9 but upon which the adhesive coating has been applied to the body of the receptacle rather than to the flap thereof as in the arrangement shown in Figs. 8 and 9.

Figs. 16 and 17 respectively are rear and side elevations of a receptacle shown in unfolded condition, adhesive coatings of several different shapes being respectively applied to two different portions of the receptacle and flap thereon whereby, the receptacle may be folded in flat condition substantially midway of the entire length thereof and thereby dispose theseveral coatings of adhesive against spaced portions of the outer surface of the receptacle in such manner that the adhesive coatings do not contact each other yet the coatings may be used to adhere the top and also a lower portion of the receptacle against a supporting surface.

Fig. 18 is a front elevation, in perspective, of a gusseted receptacle to which several strips of adhesive material have been applied to the rear surface of the receptacle and flap thereon respectively adjacent the upper and lower ends of the receptacle.

Fig. 19 is a side elevation of the receptacle shown in Fig. 18. I

Fig. 20 is a side elevation of the receptacle shown in Figs. 18 and 19 folded so as to render the size of the receptacle smaller for storage and also to protect both of the adhesive strips of material when not in use.

Fig. 21 is a rear elevation of a flat receptacle showing two bands or strips of adhesive material applied to the rear surface of the receptacle adjacent and parallel to the side edges of the receptacle.

Fig. 22 is a top plan view of the receptacle shown in Fig. 21.

Fig. 23 is an end view of the receptacle shown in Figs. 21 and 22 folded compactly so as to protect the adhesive strips and afford an enlongated arrangement comprising three portions of the receptacle folded upon each other.

Fig. 24 is the rear elevation of a receptacle similar to that shown in Fig. 8 but having a narrow-strip of adhesive material affixed to the rear surface of the flap adjacent the outer end thereof, whereby the flap selectively may be folded back upon the body portion of the receptacle to protect the adhesive or be folded upon itself and again folded downwardly upon the opposite side of the receptacle so as to hold the receptacle closed either for storage or after the same has been filled.

Fig. 25 is a side elevation of the receptacle shown in Fig. 24.

Fig. 26 is a side elevation similar to that shown in Fig. 25 but showing the flap folded upon itself and also upon the front wall of the receptacle.

Figs. 27 and 28 respectively are front and side elevations of a receptacle provided with both gummed sealing means and pressure-sensitive supporting means.

From the drawings, it is evident that an extremely simple form of receptacle which is bag-like in nature may be formed from many kinds of relatively inexpensive material such as sheet resin, paper products of various kinds, and the like, the principal characteristics of the invention comprising preferably a strip or series of dots of adhesive material afiixed to preferably the rear wall of the receptacle or a flap projecting therefrom so that the adhesive may be used preferably to detachably secure the receptacle to a supporting surface such as a vertical wall, side of an article of furniture, or the like. Further, the adhesive may be applied in liquid form either by a brush, spray, printing, or any other convenient manner and after a suitable period of curing or drying, appropriate means are used to cover the adhesive Cir 4. coating so as to prevent further drying thereof and also protect the same against engagement with other undesired surfaces until the receptacle is ready to be used. In the most preferred form of the invention, the surface upon which the adhesive is applied is folded onto another surface portion of the receptacle or the latter is folded upon the adhesive coating so as to afford the desired protection for said coating.

While the drawings illustrate a number of difierent arrangements of receptacles and adhesive means applied thereto, essentially, the foregoing basic principles of the invention apply throughout these various illustrations. The principal purpose is to show as many difierent ar rangements of the same basic principles as to illustrate the wide applicability of these principles to receptacles for the purpose to which the invention is adapted, namely, that of providing refuse-receiving receptacles which, in the preferred embodiment of the invention, may be detachably secured where convenient in vehicles, rooms, oflices, and the like and, when filled or otherwise needing replacement, the receptacle readily may be detached from the supporting surface, discarded in a trash can or incinerator, and then quickly replaced by a new and similarly disposable receptacle. Many of the different views are shown primarily to illustrate various ways in which a receptacle may be folded until ready for use, such folded arrangements not only protecting the adhesive coatings against injury until use but also main taining the receptacle in compact condition so that it readily may be stored in the glove compartment of a vehicle, a drawer or shelf of a kitchen, linen closet or the like, or otherwise.

Referring now to the embodiments of the receptacles shown in the various figures of the drawings, it will be understood that while many of these illustrations show a so-called flat bag-like receptacle, the same in most instances may equally be a gusset-type bag or receptacle, particularly if greater volume is desired within the receptacle. For simplicity of illustration however, a flat type bag or receptacle, closed at its sides and bottom but open at its upper end has been selected for exemplary illustration of the principles of the invention.

In. Figs. 1 and 2, a receptacle 10 is illustrated re spectively in rear elevation and side views. Applied to the upper portion of the rear wall 12 is a suitable strip of adhesive 14 which may be applied in any suitable manner such as by a spray and stencil, or a brush. A number of exemplary dotted lines have been used to illustrate folds 16, 18 and 20. upon which the receptacle 10 is folded to form the various configurations shown in Figs. 3 through 5. Also, outlines 22 and 24 of adhesive engaging areas are shown on the receptacle as illustrated in Fig. 1, these selectively being engaged by the adhesive coating strip 14 when the receptacle is folded in the several ways shown in Figs. 3 through 5.

The receptacle 10 may be formed from any suitable sheet-like material including a number of different kinds of synthetic resin, this material preferably being moisture resistant. Various kinds of parchment-like or oiled papers are suitable for this purpose. Also, certain forms of so-called wet-strength paper which contain an appreciable amount of synthetic bonding resin also may be used. The adhesive material 14 also is susceptible to a wide choice depending primarily upon the material from which the receptable 10 is formed. The preferred type of adhesive material is one which is pressure-sensitive,

'this being prepared in liquid form and may be applied by brushing, spraying or printing to the desired area of the receptacle 10. After a suitable amount of drying or curing, either in room atmosphere or suitable chemical or temperature conditions, it is found that the adhesive will be applied firmly to the surface of preferably restricted area of the receptacle 10. The outer surface of the applied adhesive coating, as a result of such curing or dry n Will be less adhering than the surface thereof directly against th e wallnof the receptacle? 18 to it is applied; Inviewof this,'zand also by-selecting a'suit I able material for forming the receptacle lflfiit isfound that for example when the receptacle .is' folded in flat condition along thefold lines 16,'theadhesive engaging area 22 will abut the adhesive coating strip 14 as shown in Fig. 3 so as to hold the receptacle means folded relationship until the receptacleis to "be 'adhered'to a supporting surface. Under these conditions, the adhesive material will be protected against-contact with .any undesired surface as well as against any appreciable further drying, whereby when the bottom end 26 or" the receptacle, as shownin Fig. 3, is peeled fromthe adhesive strip 14, the receptacle will not tear an'da tacky outer surface on the adhesive strip 14will then be presented for adhesive attachment to a supporting surface.

If a more compactly folded receptacle is desired, either of the arrangements respectively shown in Figs. 4 and 5 may be used wherein the receptacle is folded twice, respectively along the fold lines18 and 20, thereby permitting the adhesive strip 14 to hold the receptacle in the desired folded position but readily permit the unfOlGlIlg of the receptacle to expose the outer surfaces of strip 14 for adhering connection to a supportin'gsurface.

The receptacle 1" shown in Figs."6 and'7 'is similar to a that shown in Figs. 1 through 5 except that a plurality'of adhesive areas 28 are applied tothe rear wall 120i the receptacle 10 and an area-30 is illustrated which is coated or otherwise has applied thereto a suitable material 'afiording adhesive resistance to the adhesive areas 28, thereby insuring more ready peeling of the bottom end 26 'of the receptacle from thetadhesive areas 28 is to be unfolded for use: 1

In the receptacle arrangement'shownin Figsx8 through 10, the receptacle 10 is provided with a'flap or lip 32 comprising an extension" of the rear wall 12 thereof. One or'more adhesive areas 34 are applied to the rear surface of the flap 32 as shown'in Figs.'8"andf9, whereby-when the flap or lip::32 is folded to the positionshown in Fig. 10, the adhesive areas 34 will'be disposed against the outer surface of rear wall 12 and engage the contactupon the fold line 38 to form the folded arrangement shown in Fig. 11 orthe receptacle may be folded upon the fold line 40 shown in Fig. 8 selectively either forwardly -or rearwardly to form the 'severalarrangements respectively'shown in Figs. 12 and 13; wherein the adhesive areas 34 engage either the rear or front surface of the lower end 26 of the receptacle 10.

The receptacle arrangement shown in Figs. 14 and issimilar to that shown respectively in Figs. 8 and 9 except that a preferably elongated adhesive strip 42 is placed initially upon the rear wall 12 of the receptacl 10 adjacent the flap or lip 32 and when the flap or lip 32 is folded backwardly against the rear wall 12', an outlined area 44 thereon will engage the a hesive strip 42 to maintain the strip 42 protected. v

A slightly different arrangement of adhesive retaining means is shown in the receptacle illustrated in Figs. 16 and 17, said receptacle being similar to that shown in Figs. 8 and 14. Referring to Figs. 16 and 17, it will be seen that the flap 32 is provided with'any suitable ar rangement of adhesive layer 46, the samepreferably being only a narrow layer of adhesive, while a circular area 48" of adhesive is applied to the rear wall 12 .of-the receptacle in the lower portion thereof-whereby, when the receptacle is folded along the line 38,-theadhesive layer 46 will engage an areaon the lower portion of wall 12- as outlined at 50, while thearea 48 of adhesive'will' engage the outlined area 52 onthe'upperportion of rear wall 12 of the receptacle; it being noted that-the adhesive layer 46 is 'out of registrywith the adhesive area 48 when the receptacle is folded. It will be understood in when the receptacle this regard that the adhesive is of such nature that when two areas thereof contact each other, ready separationof the panels to which. they are applied is not possible and, when attempted, injury to the material frequently'results. One of the principal advantages of the arrangement shown in Figs. 16 and 17 is that not only may the 'upper portion of the receptacle be firmly attached to a example to a surface which slopes downwardly and inwardly.

The receptacle arrangement shown in Figs. 18 through 20 specifically comprisesa gusset-type receptacle 54, the same being shown in Fig. 18 in a front perspective elevation. The rear wall 56 thereof has a flap or lip 58 extending upwardly therefrom and an adhesive strip 68 is applied to the rear surface of the flap or lip 58 as is evident fromFig. 19. Said flap or lip may be folded backwardly upon the rear wall 56, as shown in the upper portion of Fig. 20 and whereupon the adhesive strip 68 will engage an area 62 outlined in dotted line in Fig. 18. Further, in order to provide more secure attachment of the receptacle 54 to a supporting surface, an additional adhesive strip 64 is affixed to the rear surface of rear wall 56 adjacent the lower end thereof as clearly shown in Fig. 19. Said lower end of the receptacle might be folded along the line 66 to dispose the lower adhesive strip 64 against an area onthe rear wall 56 outlined by dotted lines and designated 68. This is as illustratedin Fig. 20 and it will be seen that a compact folded arrangement is provided. The flap or lip 58 and lower portion of the receptacle readily may be unfolded from the positions thereof shown in Fig. 20 in order to dispose the receptacle as shown in Figs. 18 and 19 for attachment to a suitable supporting surface. Such a gusseted-type receptacle affords substantially more capacity than a flat type receptacle as illustrated in the preceding figures,

A slightly different arrangement of adhesive strip attaching means is illustrated in Figs. 21 through 23 as compared particularly With the receptacles shown in Figs. 1 through 7. The receptacle 70 shown in Figs. 21 through 23 is similar to that shown in said preceding figures except that strips of adhesive 72 are applied to the rear wall 74 of receptacle 7!) adjacent and substantially parallel to the opposite side edges of said receptacle. These strips 72 will be disposed vertically during use. In order that both of the strips 72 readily may be protected against contact with undesired surfaces when not in use, the receptacle easily may be folded into the three panel configuration shown in Fig. 23 in end view, said receptacle being folded along lines 76, wherein the right-hand strip of adhesive 72 will be folded into engagement with area 78 which then will dispose engagement area 80 in position to be contacted by the left-hand strip of adhesive 72 so as to maintain the receptacle folded.

A still further slightly different arrangement of receptacle is shown in Figs. 24 through 26, this receptacle being similar to that shownin Figs. 8 and 14 and thereby is designated as receptacle 10. A flap or lip 32 is provided which has a fold line 82 extending longitudinally across the same preferably midway of the length thereof. Said flap also is provided with a relatively narrow adhesive strip 84 which, when the flap or lip 32 is folded into the dotted line position shown in Fig. 25 will dispose the adhesive strip 84 againstthe area outlined by dotted lines 86. However, when for example the receptacle is filled and it is desired to maintain the same closed until disposal takes place, the flap or lip 32 may be folded against the front wall of the receptacle 10 as shown in Fig. 26 and also folded along the line 82 soas to dispose the adhesive strip 84 inne'rmostlan'd against the outer surface of the front wall of the receptacle adjacent the filling end 88 thereof. This will serve to maintain the receptacle in closed and sealed condition. If desired the receptacle also initially may be folded into this arrangement to protect the adhesive strip 84 but such folding is slightly more complicated than that shown in dotted lines in Fig. 25.

In all of the illustrations in the drawings, the thicknesses of the adhesive coating strip, adhesive tapes, protective strips, and the sheet material from which the receptacles per se have been formed, have been exaggerated substantially in order to facilitate illustrating the principles of the invention. In most instances, the materials used will not be nearly as thick as illustrated.

Further, in order to facilitate the separating of certain folded panels of the receptacles from the wall to which they have tentatively been adhered so as to render tire receptacle unfolded and ready for use, it will be understood that when necessary, the principles of the invention permit the use of a coating or other form of application of resist material which will prevent too firm adherence of the adhesive layers or tapes to said tentatively engaged areas of the receptacle. In the embodiment shown specifically in Figs. 6 and 7, one illustration of an exernplary form of area of adhesive resistant material is shown. As explained above, many types of such material are available which will not injure the receptacle per se or any contents thereof. There are however many types of material available for forming receptacles of this nature which do not require the use of such a resistant coating and the adhesive strips readily may be peeled therefrom to render the same exposed and ready for adhesive engagement with a supporting surface.

In the foregoing description, where the term adhesive has been used, it is intended to be considered in the broad sense of including not only tacky, pressure sensitive cements but also other suitable forms of adhesives may be used such as those which must be activated by heat, solvent, or otherwise, to render them tacky for application to a supporting surface.

In the event the receptacle of the present invention is to be suspended from a surface not readily capable of having adhesive adhere thereto, such as mohair or other types of pile fabrics, as well as certain woven textile fabrics, it is possible to use the present invention readily with such materials by using a small smooth surfaced strip or plate, not shown, formed from metal, resin, fiber or otherwise, which readily may be attached to such upholstery by upholstery pins or the like, and the adhesive of the various receptacles described hereinabove readily will adhere to such strip or plate and also be peelable therefrom when desired.

It also has been found that certain types of sealer substances such, for example, as varnish or selected lacquers having limited sticking alfmity for the pressure-sensitive coatings by which the receptacles are supported, may be used advantageously upon contact areas of the receptacles such as areas in Figs. 6 and 7. Such areas are exemplary to illustrate areas to be engaged by the adhesive coatings until ready for use. The adhesive is preserved by such sealer coatings quite freshly in highly tacky condition against drying out due possibly to atmosphere leaking through the pores of the paper, for example, from which the receptacles may be made.

Further, certain coatings of this nature which of themselves are non-tacky but which have an even greater sticking afliinity for the pressure-sensitive adhesives which support the receptacle in use, may be used on portions of the receptacle to be engaged by such adhesive when the flap, for example, upon which the adhesive is positioned is folded over a filled receptacle into engagement with said coating to seal the receptacle closed. Such a closing and sealing arrangement, for example, is shown in Figs. 24 through 26, in which instance the sticking aflinity coating would be positioned on the upper end of the outer surface of the rear wall of the receptacle.

Still another construction for sealing a receptacle closed is shown in Figs. 27 and 28 wherein a normallyflat type envelope-like receptacle 162 has a flap or lip 164 provided with a strip 166 of conventional, moistenable mucilage, in conventional manner. A strip of pressure-sensitive adhesive 170 is applied to the outside of flap or lip 164'and when the flap or lip is folded down as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 27, the adhesive will peelably engage the outer surface of the front wall of the receptacle. Said adhesive engages a supporting surface in useto hold the receptacle pendant-like. When the receptacle is full, it is peeled from the supporting surface, the mucilage 166 is moistened, and flap or lip 164 is folded closed over the opening of the receptacle to engage an area of the con ventional back wall of envelope-like receptacle 162 -to hold it closed. The receptacle then may be disposed of conveniently without spilling. a

While the invention has been described and illustrated in its several preferred embodiments, and has included certain details, it should be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the precise details herein illustrated and described since the same may be. carried out in other ways falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

I claim:

l. A folded article of manufacture comprising an openended bag-like receptacle comprising connected opposing walls formed from flexible sheet material, said receptacle and walls initially being flat and folded transversely thereof upon itself, and means releasably securing the abutting folded portions of said receptacle together comprising pressure sensitive adhesive material applied to restricted areas on the outer surface of one wall of said receptacle adjacent the open end thereof, whereby said adhesive peelably secures one folded portion of said receptacle to the other folded portion thereof and the peel- .able portion covers and protects said adhesive until said portions are separated to expose said adhesive for adherence of said adhesive to a supporting sunface upon which said receptacle is to be supported.

2. A folded article of manufacture comprising an openended bag-like receptacle having connected opposing walls formed from flexible sheet material, said receptacle and walls initially being flat and one of said walls having a lip extending beyond the other wall when said receptacle is unfolded, pressure-sensitive adhesive means permanently applied to a restricted area on one wall adjacent the filling end thereof and said lip normally being folded transversely upon said wall to cover and peelably adhere to said adhesive means until ready for use, said lip protecting said adhesive means and being peelable therefrom to expose said adhesive means for adherence to a supporting surface from which said receptacle is to be suspended.

3. A folded article of manufacture comprising an openended bag-like receptacle having connected opposing walls formed from flexible sheet material and having a filling opening at one end, said receptacle and walls initially being flat and one of said walls having a foldable lip extending beyond the other wall when said lip is unfolded, said lip having pressure-sensitive adhesive means permanently applied to a restricted area on one surface thereof and said lip being folded transversely of said receptacle over against the wall from which it extends, whereby said wall covers and peelably adheres to said adhesive means until ready for use, said lip and adhesive means being separable readily from said last mentioned wall upon unfolding said lip, whereby said adhesive means on said lip may be adhered adhesively to a supporting surface from which said receptacle is to be suspended.

4. A folded article of manufacture comprising an openended bag-like receptacle having connected opposing walls formed from flexible sheet material and having a filling opening at one end, portions of said flattened receptacle being folded upon themselves transversely, pressuresensitive adhesive applied to restricted areas on the outer surface of one Wall of said receptacle respectively adjacent the filling opening and the opposite end of said receptacle, and folded portions of said one wall of said receptacle which are free from adhesive covering said adhesive areas and peelably adhering thereto until ready for use, whereby said port-ions free from adhesive may be peeled from said adhesive means to expose the same for adherence to a supporting surface upon which said receptacle is to be supported.

5. The folded article of manufacture set forth in claim 4 further characterized by said adhesive means comprising bands of pressure sensitive material affixed to and extending transversely across said receptacle parallel to the folds therein and being positioned adjacent the top and bottom edges of said receptacle when unfolded.

6. The folded article of manufacture set forth in claim 4 further characterized by said receptacle initially being fiat and folded transversely upon itself midway of its 10 length, said pressure-sensitive adhesive means comprising bands of pressure-sensitive adhesive material applied to the outer surface of one wall of said receptacle when unfolded in spaced relationship to each other and respectively on portions of the upper and lower halves of said one wall which will be out of registry when said receptacle is folded midway of its length, whereby said adhesive areas will not engage each other when said receptacle is folded along said line to effect covering of said adhesive means by other adhesive free areas of said wall to protect said adhesive when not in use.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,114,367 Berkowitz Apr. 19, 1938 2,384,223 Wilbur Sept. 4, 1945 2,614,349 Barnes Oct. 21, 1952 2,689,594 Wendt Sept. 21, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2114367 *Mar 25, 1936Apr 19, 1938Berkowitz Envelope CompanySelf-sealing envelope
US2384223 *Feb 9, 1942Sep 4, 1945Ellen Wilbur ElizaWrapper
US2614349 *Jun 17, 1948Oct 21, 1952Bemis Bro Bag CoDetachable-label bag
US2689594 *Sep 4, 1952Sep 21, 1954Charles M WendtDisposable article receiving pocket
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3109578 *Feb 12, 1962Nov 5, 1963Equitable Paper Bag CoHospital refuse bag or the like
US3141600 *Apr 18, 1962Jul 21, 1964Daniel RosenthalDisposable bag type receptacles
US3148799 *Aug 20, 1962Sep 15, 1964Meroney Albert HDisposable adjustable receptacle liner for wet refuse
US3214080 *May 3, 1963Oct 26, 1965Republic Foil IncSelf-mounting litter bag and method of manufacture
US3244210 *Dec 28, 1962Apr 5, 1966Scholl Mfg Co IncDisposable plastic bag for hot or cold substances
US4034910 *Feb 13, 1976Jul 12, 1977Exclusive Envelope CorporationCombination advertising, coin and receipt holding envelope
US4103821 *Jul 22, 1977Aug 1, 1978Pak-Well CorporationShipping envelope
US4640411 *Nov 7, 1984Feb 3, 1987Floating Sky, Inc.Mailer construction
US4708248 *Feb 10, 1986Nov 24, 1987Davis George HCollapsible food and beverage container
US4711390 *May 28, 1986Dec 8, 1987A.K.G.S.Collapsible box for trash compacting system
US4790670 *Jan 11, 1985Dec 13, 1988Poly-Pak Industries, Inc.Bag with closeable flap and method of manufacturing same
US4978231 *Feb 24, 1989Dec 18, 1990Ling Zhang AMultiple disposable plastic bag assembly
US5110005 *Mar 26, 1990May 5, 1992Pactec, Inc.Waste container liner
US5228574 *Oct 25, 1991Jul 20, 1993Mobil Oil CorporationReusable trash bag or food bag container and method of making it
US5370246 *Aug 5, 1992Dec 6, 1994Traynor; Joan G.Article storage caddy
US5511883 *Dec 29, 1994Apr 30, 1996Plitek, L.L.C.Hang tab for containers
US5741208 *Oct 15, 1996Apr 21, 1998Industrial Transportation, Inc.Environmental container liner and method of manufacture
US5746862 *Oct 26, 1995May 5, 1998Super Sack Mfg. Corp.Method of making a liner for roll-off waste containers
US5887942 *Jan 11, 1996Mar 30, 1999Allegro, Jr.; JamesTrash collection for folding seat facilities
US5927495 *Jun 20, 1997Jul 27, 1999Manco, Inc.Mailer box product
US5960947 *Jul 1, 1996Oct 5, 1999The Clorox CompanySample display device
US6126009 *Dec 29, 1998Oct 3, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Portable, soft pack facial tissue dispensing system
US7033077 *Jun 3, 2003Apr 25, 2006Peter TaylorSealable bags made of plastics or other materials and method of making plastic sheeting for manufacturing sealable bags
US7845511Aug 11, 2006Dec 7, 2010Pactec, Inc.Containment bag for use in a commercial disposal container
US8499953Jun 23, 2006Aug 6, 2013Pactec, Inc.Containment bag for use in a commercial disposal container
US8562212Dec 3, 2010Oct 22, 2013Pactec, Inc.Containment bag for use in a commercial disposal container
US8663768Oct 19, 2009Mar 4, 2014El Ancla Bolsas Y Empagques, S. A. De C.V.Adhesive strip for adhering objects to a rigid surface
US8689973 *Mar 7, 2011Apr 8, 2014Stephen BerglundGarment bag systems
US8714350Mar 13, 2013May 6, 2014Stephen E. BerglundGarment bag systems and methods of use
US8777034May 11, 2012Jul 15, 2014Pactec, Inc.Containment bag system for use in a commercial disposal container
US8894281Aug 11, 2006Nov 25, 2014Pactec, Inc.Lifting bag
US8894282Aug 28, 2007Nov 25, 2014Pactec, Inc.Lifting bag device
US9056710Oct 21, 2013Jun 16, 2015Pactec, Inc.Containment bag for use in a commercial disposal container
US9085408Nov 28, 2012Jul 21, 2015Stephen E. BerglundGarment bag systems and methods of use
US9102465 *Jan 22, 2010Aug 11, 2015Gail Elizabeth DavisContainer and method for storing animal waste and controlling associated odor
US20050252808 *Jul 21, 2005Nov 17, 2005Essetle CorporationFile with high-traction surface
US20100209019 *Aug 19, 2010Confoy Robert EShipping package that converts into a backpack
US20100301104 *Feb 25, 2010Dec 2, 2010Jerzy DrwiegaProtective casing
US20110180008 *Jul 28, 2011Gail Elizabeth DavisContainer and method for storing animal waste and controlling associated odor
US20110192740 *Aug 11, 2011Stephen BerglundGarment Bag System
US20110280499 *Nov 17, 2011Brenda BrundageApparatus for maintaining a position of an item
US20140029872 *Jun 20, 2013Jan 30, 2014Danny NessBulk bag apparatus
EP0039581A1 *Apr 30, 1981Nov 11, 1981McManus, Gerald Peter MichaelA foldable container
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/11, 383/84, 206/813, 383/62, 383/14, 206/806, 383/2
International ClassificationB65D33/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/14, Y10S206/813, Y10S206/806
European ClassificationB65D33/14