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Publication numberUS2864218 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1958
Filing dateOct 31, 1955
Priority dateOct 31, 1955
Publication numberUS 2864218 A, US 2864218A, US-A-2864218, US2864218 A, US2864218A
InventorsBroyles Horace N, Evans George W, Herbert Hansen H, Kindel William H, Perman Douglas V, Wilson James S
Original AssigneeMechanical Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packing apparatus
US 2864218 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 16, 1958 J 5, WILSON ET AL 2,864,218

PACKING APPARATUS Filed 001;. 51, 1955 e Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS. JAMES 8. WILSON DOUGLAS V. PERMAM H. HERBERT HANSEN HORACE N. BROYLES GEORGE W. EVANS PAUL PAVONI WILLIAM H. KINDEL A TTOR/VE) Dec. 16, 1958 5, WILSON ET AL I 2,864,218

PACKING APPARATUS 6 Sheets-Sheet Filed Oct. 31, 1955 INVENTORJ. JAMES S. W/LSO/V ETAL BY wg wyw A TTO/P/VEY Dec. 16, 1958 J. 5. WILSON ET AL 2,364,218

PACKING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 51, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet INVENTORS. JAMES 5. WILSON E 7' AL A TTORNE) Dec; 16, 1958 J. s. WILSON ETAL I PACKING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 31, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTORS. JAMES W/L SON ETAL Y ATTORNEY PACKING APPARATUS Application October 31, 1955, Serial No. 543,866

19 Claims. (Cl. 53-124) This invention relates to packing apparatus, and more particularly to apparatus for packing a compressible article, such as a mattress, into a bag or container therefor, such as made of paper.

For shipping and storage purposes, primarily to maintain the surface thereof clean, but also for convenience in handling and stacking during storage, mattresses are conventionally packed in paper bags. Usually the bags are slightly smaller than the mattress in uncompressed condition, so that the mattress is in at least slightly compressed condition while in the bag and therefore the mattress will maintain its shape and also will form a slightly smaller package. Also, the mattress will not tend to slip around in the bag, nor will loose and protruding portions of the bag, which may become damaged and torn, tend to be produced. Other compressible articles, similar to mattresses, such as cushions, sofa seats, box springs and the like, may be similarly packaged. To compress a mattress while simultaneously placing it in a bag by hand is a time consuming and expensive operation, since the bags conventionally used are sufficiently strong to contain the mattress in compressed condition after the mattress has been compressed therein, but the previously open end of the bag and sometimes other portions of the bag tend to split while the mattress is placed therein by hand. As will be evident, a split bag means that the time consumed in attempting to place the mattress in the bag, up until the time the bag splits, is completely wasted. Also, if a mattress is run between rollers or other compressing means and guided into a bag. the tendency for the mattress to split the bag, not only at the time it enters but also thereafter, produces an undue waste of labor and material. Mattressesalso come in dilferent sizes and apparatus for packing mattresses in bags must therefore be adapted to accommodate such different sizes.

In the copending application of Horace N. Broyles, George W. Evans, Paul Pavoni and William H. Kindel, Serial No. 462,784, filed October 18, 1954 and entitled Packing Apparatus, there is disclosed and apparatus for packing a mattress or the like into a bag, which may include a table or horizontal fiat surface along which a mattress may be moved longitudinally; a spout having a converging throat section and a delivery section over which the open end of a bag may be placed, such delivery section conveniently having .a fixed bottom and sides but a movable top, together with a stop or other means for limiting movement of the top; and a pusher which engages an end of a mattress andpushes the mattress into the bag, the pusher being conveniently automatically returned after moving into the delivery section of the spout. Different sizes of spouts are provided for different sizes of mattresses and are optionally movable'into operative position. The packing apparatus of the present invention embodies certain of the above features, together with additional features, and thus may be considered as an improvement over the apparatus of the Broyles et al. application Serial No. 462,784.

In general, the improvements of the present invention enable a packer for a mattress and the like to have a single spout which can be readily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of articles as well as variations in the amount of, compression, both laterally and depthwise; controls for the spout which can be operated by hand or electrically to move certain parts of the spout to preselected positions; a spout which remains centered with respect to the table and-pusher through its range of lateral adjustment; an improved stop for limiting movement of a movable portion of the spout, to prevent bag splitting; an attachment for the stop which automatically holds the bag in position as the article enters'it and as the article is being pushed into it; a pusher which is adjusted and operated more easily, which has little tendency to ride over or onto the article, which can be adjusted for article length, and which is guided more accurately and with less possibility of binding on either the forward or return stroke; and pusher controls which tend to operate more effectively. Thus, among the objects of the present invention are to provide a packer for mattresses and the like having the above improvements.

Additional objects and the novel features of this invention will become apparent from the description which follows, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of mattress packing apparatus constructed in accordance with this invention, taken from a position at one side and forwardly of the same;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the apparatus of Fig. l, with certain parts omitted for clarity of illustration.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the apparatus as shownin Fig. 2, with certain parts broken away to show the interior construction more clearly;

Fig. 4 is a vertical longitudinal section taken along line 4-4 of Fig. 2; I

Fig. 5 is an enlarged top plan view of a spout and as sociated parts which form a portion of the apparatus of Fig. 1, with the top cover of the spout housing removed;

Fig. 6 is a vertical section, taken along line 66 of r Fig. 7 is a vertical section, taken along line 7-7 of Fig. 6, showing an article passing through the spout;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical section, similar to a portion of Fig. 7, but illustrating an alternative construction;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary end elevation of the spout housing, taken from the position of line 9--9 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 10 is a vertical section, taken along line 1010 of Fig. 6; v s

Fig. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section, taken along 1ine,11--11 of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 12 is a schematic wiring diagram of the control circuit. A As illustrated in Fig. 1 apparatus for packing mattresses or the like. into bags, constructed in accordance with this invention, may, include elements similar in operation to the .mattress packer of the aforesaid Broyles et al. application Serial'No. 462,784, such as a table T or other structure providing a surface onto which a compressible article, such as a mattress, may be placed for packing into a bag; a pusher P which is moved forwardly to pushthe article into the bag and then rearwadly to permit the next articletobe placed on the table T; a guidespout S, which, in accordance with this invention, is adjustable to accommodate different Widths and'thick'nesses of compressible articles; and a housing H inwhich the various partsfor adjusting the spout 2 may be installed. As in Figs. 4 and 7, the pusher P may be moved forwardly along the table Tto push a compressible article, such as a mattress 10, through spout S and into 'a'bag 11, conveniently a paper bag. The mattress may be moved onto top 12 of Table T in front of pusher P when in rear position, as in Fig. 1, beneath an auxilary table 13 supported by legs 14, each mattress conveniently being fed to auxiliary table 13 inany. suitable manner, such as down. a chute..

1 The pusher P may comprise a front plate 15, a top lfi and side bars 17, connected together by welding and supported, as in Fig. 3, by a front and rear pair of rollers18, adapted. to move along the table top 12. A transversely extending channel 19 may be connected to the underside of the pusher P at a position between the rollers 18 and may be provided, at each end, with a depending flange 20, which extends into a space between the table top 12 and a channel 21 at each side of the table, for a purpose hereinafter described. The front plate 15 of the pusher P may be provided with area'rwardly extending flange 22 at the bottom thereof, tofacilitate attachment'of a lip 23 adapted to support acompressible article which is relatively lacking in self support, such as a mattress for a rollaway bed and the like, which is designed to be rolled up or bent at sharp angles. Of course, when the pusher P is utilized to pack into a bag a comparatively self supporting article, such as an inner spring mattress or a box spring, the lip 23 may be omitted. The lip 23 preferably has a size corresponding to the narrowest and shortest article which will ordinarily be packed into the bag, so that it may enter the bag along with the article but will be withdrawn when the pusher is moved rearwardly. In addition, the lip 23 maybe removed and a bar attached to the front plate 15 of pusher P, which may be wider than the pusher P in the event that the article to be packed is wider thanthe pusher P. It will be understood, of course, that the front end of the pusher P enters the bag when the article is' pushed therein so that the front end of the pusher P can be no wider than the article being movedinto the bag.

The pusher P may be actuated by a chain 25 at each side of table T, which moves within each of the channels 19, each end of each chain being attached to bracket 20, as in Figs. 3 and 11, with each chain extending at the front around-a sprocket 26, mounted on a drive shaft 27' extending transversely at the front of table T, and at the rear around a sprocket 28 mounted on a counter shaft 29 at. the rear of table T, suitable bearings for shafts 27 and 29 being provided in a conventionalmanner, such as mounted on brackets attached to posts 30 which support Table T. The posts 30 may be reinforced by suitable angle bars and the like, as in Fig. '1, while legs 14 of auxiliary table 13 may be mounted on channels 21 to permit flanges 20 to move to a rear position beneath auxiliary table 13. The'drive shaft 27 may be driven by a reversible motor 31- and a speed reduction gearing connected by a chain 32, together with appropriate sprockets for the chain, with the drive shaft 27. The automatic reversal of the pusher P, after it has enteredthe bag, may be obtained through a downwardly and laterally extending cam 33, mounted on a bracket 20 at one side .of the pusher P, as in Fig. 3, and adapted to engage'a roller on the end of an upwardly extending, actuating arm 34 of a microswitch 35 Similarly, pusher P'"may be automatically stopped at an appropriate rear position by engagement of cam 33 with a similar roller on arm 34 of a microswitch' 36, each of the microswitches 35 and 36 being adjustable along a mounting, plate 37. In addition, a safety microswitch 38 may be placed at the rear end of the table'for engagement of the roller on its arm 34 by'cam 33, in the event that for some reason microswitch '36 does not operate to stop the pusher P.

' As'illustrated in Fig. 11, each bracket 20 may carry a roller 40 which rotates about a horizontal axis and engages the underside of the top flange of channel 21 at each side to prevent the pusher. P fiOm mo P wardly or tending to ride over the article being packed, or to ride up on the article and hit the spout S. Also,- each of the brackets 20 may carry a guide roller 41 which rotates about a vertical axis and is adapted to engage the vertical flange of an angle 42 mounted in depending relation with respect to the edge of top 12 of table T, to maintain the pusher P in lateral align-- ment. The angle 42 may be reinforced at several ap-' propriate positions by an angle bracket 43 attached to channel 21. The top 12 of table T may be made of metal plate or other suitable material, although a satisfactory top may be providedby a sheet of metal, such as aluminum, overlying a supporting layer of wood, as shown in Fig. 11.

The housing H for the adjustable spout S, as in Fig. 1, may comprise upright side plates 45, conveniently reinforced at the edges by flanges and connected to the channels 21 of table T, with a front plate 46 extending transversely between the upper ends thereof and a rear plate 47, as in Figs. 5 and 9, similarly extending transversely between the upper ends of side plates 45. The front and rear plates may be reinforced at their lower edges by flanges, as shown, while the parts inside the housing may be further enclosed and protected by a removable cover 48. Extending from each end of the housing H, to permit attachment of an adjusting device thereto at either side, is a shaft 49 for adjusting the vertical position of a stop bar 50 and a counter shaft 51 for adjusting the elevation of the top of the spout S, the operation of each of which will be described later.

The spout S may include a bottom center plate 52, as in Fig. 6, which may be mounted as an extension of the top 12 of table T, as in Fig. 10, and also plates 53 and 54 movable beneath center plate 52 to permit adjustment laterally of sides 55 and 55' which extend vertically upwardly from plates 53 and 54, respectively, at the outer edges of the latter. The respective sides 55 and 55' of the spout may be integral with or attached to the movable bottom plates 53 and 54 and provided with rear flanges 56 and 56', respectively, which converge from the rear toward the front and thereby provide a converging throat section at the sides for compressing the article'being packed to a width which will fit within the bag in which the article is being packed. As will be evident from Fig. 6, the width of center plate 52 is preferably equal to the width of the narrowest article to be packed, while the Width of movable plates 53 and 54 is preferably such that they may be moved outwardly beneath center plate 52 and will accommodate the width of the widest article to be packed, but without moving out from under the center plate. Each bottom plate 53 and 54', together with the attached side plate 55 or 55', is mounted within an angular frame 57 or 58, respectively, to enable the bottom and side plates to be moved inwardly and out- Wardly concurrently. The lower side of each angular frame 57 and 58, as in Fig. 6, is provided with a pair of depending bearings 59, engaging a rod 60 which extends between the housing side plates 45 and maintains the angular frames 57 and 58 in lateral and longitudinal alignment along the bottom. The upper end of each angle frame 57 and 58 may be provided with oppositely threaded, circular nuts 61 and 61', respectively, adapted to engage the opposite threads 62 and 62', respectively, of a shaft 63 which is turned in one direction tomove the sides of the spout together and in the opposite direction to move the sides of the spout apart. Shaft 63 may be journaled in bearings 64 at each end and a bearing 64 adjacent the center for retation by a reversible motor 65, which is provided with a drive pinion 66 engaging a gear 67 mounted on shaft 63, as in: Fig. 10. Bearings 64, as in Fig. 5, may be mounted on the housing side plates 45, while bearing 64 may be mounted on a bar 68 which extends between housing front plate 47 and a' supporting bar or 73 together or apart.

angle 69, which in turn extends between the housing side plates 45. Motor 65 may be mounted on a bracket 70 extending between the housing front plate 46 and angle 69,.the bracket 70 conveniently extending over shaft 63.

The top of the spout S is also adjustable, not only laterally but also vertically, and is also pivoted at the rear, including a pair of plates 72 and 73 disposed in overlapping relation, as in Fig. 5. The edge 73' of the plate 73, shown in dotted lines in Fig. 5, which is beneath plate 72 and which therefore will engage the article being packed, may be slanted at an angle, as shown, so as to prevent the possibility of catching on the article being packed, so that the article will slide over the slanted edge when moving forwardly. At their rear ends, plates 72 and 73 may be provided with upwardly extending flanges 74 for attachment to brackets 75 which are pivotally mounted, as by hearing forks 76, on a rod 77. Rod 77 extends between arms 78, each in turn attached to the inner end of a counter shaft 51. As will be evident from Figs. 6, 7 and 10, pivotal movement of counter shafts 51 will cause the brackets 75 and plates 72 and 73, connected therewith, to move upwardly or downwardly, depending upon the direction in which the counter shafts 51 are pivoted. Plates 72 and 73 are moved together and apart concurrently with the bottom plates and sides of the spout by oppositely threaded circular nuts 79 and 79', engaging the respective opposite threads 62 and 62 of shaft 63. Each nut 79 and 79', as in Figs. 5 and 10, is provided with an outwardly extending sleeve 80 which receives a pin 81 extending from a bearing 82 mounted on rod 77 and abutted by bearing forks 76, as shown also in Fig. 6. As will be evident, lateral movement of nuts 79 and 79 will move bearings 82 together or apart, as the case may be, which in turn causes brackets 75 and the respective plates 72 and 73 to move together or apart the same distance. Each sleeve 80 cooperates with a pin 81 to transmit lateral movement of nut 79 or 79' to the respective top plate and also to permit rod 77 to move toward or away from shaft 63 during arcuate movement of rod 77 about counter shafts 51 as a center. Thus, the rear end of plates 72 and 73 can be adjusted upwardly or downwardly by the counter shafts 51 without detracting from the ability of the oppositely threaded shaft 63 to move the plates 72 and Each counter shaft 51 may be supported by bearing 83 and 83, respectively mounted on a housing side plate 45 and a bar 68 extending between housing rear plate 47 and angle 69.

For adjustment of counter shafts 51, a lever 84 having a handle 85 may be mounted at one end of housing H on the protruding end of that counter shaft 51, so that the lever 84 may be moved to any desired position and held in that position to adjust the elevation of the rear ends of the plates 72 and 73. Normally, only two or perhaps three different thicknesses of articles will be packed in any one series of operations so that provision may be made for holding the lever 84 in one of two or three different positions, as by a removable pin 86 extending through a hole in the end of lever 84 opposite handle 85 and into an arcuate slot 87, conveniently provided in the side plate 45, as in Fig. 9. Two or more threaded ferrules 88, each provided with a locking nut on the inside, as in Fig. 5, and each adapted to be locked at a desired position along slot 87, may cooperate with pin 86 so that the pin 86 may be removed and the handle 84 turned to the position of another ferrule 88 and the pin inserted therein, when the elevation of the rear end of the top plates 70 and 71 is to be changed. Such a position may include the centralposition of a ferrule 88, shown in Fig. 9, and also positions adjacent either end of slot 87, as in Fig. 5, or any intermediate position. The position of any ferruleLSS-may be changed merely by loosening its lockseems ing nut and shifting the handle with'the 86 in the ferrule to be adjusted to a position corresponding to the desired elevation at the rear ends of plates 72 and 73, and then tightening the lock nut on the ferrule. If desired,'marks indicating the various elevations of the rear ends of plates 72 and 73 may be provided around the slot 87, so that the ferrules 88 maybe readily placed in desired positions. Preferably, a slot 87 is provided in each of the side plates 45, so that the lever 84 may be attached to the extending end of counter shaft 51 at either side of the machine.

The stop bar 50, referred to previously, may comprise merely a transversely extending channel welded or otherwise suitably secured to the lower ends of a pair' of racks 90, as in Figs. 1 and 10, each rack 90 engaging a pinion 91 mounted on shaft- 49 and racks 90 also being movable upwardly and downwardly in guide tubes 92, preferably corresponding to the shape of the racks, as shown in Figs. 5 and 10. A hand wheel 93 provided with a disc 94, as in Figs. 5 and 10, may be attached to the extending end of shaft 49, preferably on the same side of housing H as lever 84 to permit adjustment to be made from the same side, while shaft 49 may be journaled in bearings 83" mounted on the housing side plates 45. Disc 94 may be provided with a plurality of holes 95, as in Fig. 9, for a removable pin 96 extending into a hole provided therefor in the corresponding side plate 45 of housing H, to lock disk 94 in any desired position. Holes 95 may be calibrated so as to indicate the number of inches of distance between the bottom plate 52 and top plate 73 when top plates 72 and 73 engage stop bar 50, so that adjustment to a desired position for any change in the thickness of the article may be readily affected.

The stop bar 50 limits upward movement of the front ends of plates 72 and 73, which extend into the bag for a sufiicient distance that when the article being packed expands after leaving plates 72 and 73, the distance from the end of the bag will be sufficient that splitting or tearing of the end of the bag will not be produced. While the rear ends of plates 72 and 73 may be provided with an angular portion forwardly of the brackets 75, plates 72 and 73 may be sufficiently flexible that, as the article, such as mattress 10 of Fig. 4, is pushed into the spout, the plates 72 and 73 will be lifted and the plates will abut against the stop bar 50, with the rear portion of the plates 72 and 73 bending slightly between brackets 75 and the stop bar 50, as in Fig. 7. Thus, brackets 75 are preferably placed at an elevation slightly greater than the thickness of the uncompressed article, while stop bar 50 is set at a position corresponding to the inside height of the bag. In this way, the flexed portion of plates 72 and 73, between the brackets 75 and stop bar 50, will act as a convering throat section.

When an article is to be placed in a bag, an auxiliary table (not shown) may be placed in front of the spout S, as in the manner described in the aforesaid Broyles et al. copending application Serial No. 462,784. Then, the 'bag 11, as in Fig. 4 and Fig. 7, is placed over the front end of the spout, the bag being held on the spout by hand, if desired, while the article is being pushed into the bag. It will be noted that each side 55 and 55. of the spout has an upper edge 97, as in Fig. 10, which curves upwardly to the position of stop bar 50 and more sharply upwardly thereafter, so as to accommodate different thicknesses of articles and also to permit bags having different inside heights to be placed thereover without difficulty. As the mattress moves into the spout, the converging throat section provided by the coverging flanges 56 and 56' of the sides will compress the article laterally, while the article will be compressed in a vertical direction by engaging the rear portion of the top plates 72 and 73, i. e., the converging throat section provided when the plates 72 and 73 abut against the stop bar.50,

As the article moves further into the bag, the front portion of the top plates 72 and 73 will extend forwardly in a substantially horizontal position, being restrained from any appreciable upward movement by the stop bar 50. Or, when plates 72 and 73 are at least slightly flexible, the front ends of plates 72 and 73 will push upwardly against the inside of the bag, but this force is applied at a considerable distance within the bag from the open end, so that there is little possibility of splitting the open end of the bag. 'As the article moves further into the bag, additional portions thereof will be compressed and then expand slightly inside the bag until the front end of the pusher P has entered the bag, the final position of the front end of pusher P preferably being just forwardly of the position of stop bar 50, i. e., a sutficient distance that the front end of the mattress or other article will reach the opposite or closed end of the bag. Pusher P is then automatically withdrawn and returned to the starting position, as determined by the microswitches previously described. Then, the bag may he slipped off the spout and the extending ends of the formerly open end of the bag closed and sealed to completely enclose the article, as for shipping or storage purposes.

With the stop bar 50 utilized in the manner illustrated in Fig. 7, for instance, it is normally necessary to hold the bag on the spout S while the article is being pushed into the bag. However, stop bar 50 may be provided with means for automatically hold the bag, such as illustrated in Fig. 8. Thus, a plate 98, having a width corresponding to that of the stop bar 50, may be welded or otherwise suitably secured to either the front or the underside of the stop bar 50 and is provided on the underside and adjacent its forward edge with a bag engaging strip 99, formed of rubber or other suitable material. As will be evident, the article will push the top plates 72 and 73 forwardly and into engagement with the stop bar 50 before the article actually engages the bag, with the result that the plates 72 and 73 will be pushed upwardly toward the inside of the bag at a position forwardly of the stop bar. This upward pressure against the inside of the bag is sufficient, when cooperating with the downward pressure exerted bystrip 99 on the top of the bag, to hold the bag securely in position while the article is being pushed therein. Thus, with plate 98 and strip 99, or other suitable means for engaging the top of the bag forwardly of stop bar 50, the bag is automatically held in position while being filled. After the pusher has moved the article into the bag, the pressure against the under side of plates 72 and 73, particularly behind stop bar 50, is released, so that after the pusher has returned, the bag may be readily slipped off the spout and from between plate 72 and strip 99.

For controlling the operation of the apparatus of this invention, in addition to the microswitches previouslydescribed, certain parts may be mounted in a box 100, conveniently placed on the front of the apparatus beneath the spout S. The control apparatus may include three switches 101, 102 and 103, conveniently mounted on the front of housing H, as in Fig. 1, for manual control of the pusher P. Thus, switch 101 may be pushed to start pusher P forwardly from any position, switch 102 may be pushed to start pusher P rearwardly from any position, while switch 103 may be pushed to stop pusher P at any, desired point. For convenience in operation, a foot switch 104, as in Fig. 1, connected by a cord 105 to control box 100, may be placed in a convenient position for starting pusherP, while electric power may be supplied to box 100 by a lead cord 106. Aspout selector switch 107 may also be provided, for controlling the lateral position of the sides of spout S, switch 107 conveniently being a three position switch, so that two of these positions may be used for automatically moving the spout to accommodatetwo different preselected article widths, while the third position may be used to permit motor to be controlled manually, as by a so-called inching mechanism, controlled by a switch 108, which may be snapped in one direction to cause motor 65 to move the sides of the spout apart and in the opposite direction to cause motor 65 to move the sides of the spout together. Thus, any other width between the spout sides, in addition to the preselected positions, may be provided by use of the inching switch 108. Microswitches 109, 110 and 111, as in Fig. 5, may be adjustably mounted on a rod 112 and actuated by a cam 113 mounted on nut 61, so as to stop motor 65 in accordance with the position of the sides of the spout. Microswitch 109 may be associated with one position of switch 107 and microswitch 110 with another position of switch 107, so that the motor 65 will move cam 113 until the respective microswitch 109 or 110 stops the motor, when switch 107 is in the respective position. Limit switch 109 may be conveniently set so that the spout will be 3 ft. 3 in. wide, i. e., the width of a twin bed mattress, while limit switch 110 may be set so that the spout will be 4 ft. 6 in. wide, the width of a double bed mattress, when the cam 113 engages the respective switch. Microswitch 111 may be a limit switch which stops motor 65 when the spout is opened to its widest extent.

A portion of the electrical circuit useful in such control and operation is shown in the wiring diagram of Fig. 12, in which lead wires supply control current at a suitable voltage, such as 110 volts A. C. The lower portion of the wiring diagram relates to the control circuit for the pusher, the forward and reverse winding relays of motor 31 being indicated as F and R, respectively, while the upper portion of the wiring diagram relates to the control circuit for the spout, the forward or out and the reverse or in winding relays of motor 65 being indicated as F and R, respectively. In the pusher control circuit, a wire 126 leads from one lead wire 125 to manual stop switch 103 and thence to a junction to which is connected a wire 127 leading to a normally closed switch of front limit switch 34, and a series connection wire 128 in paral-v lel with another series connection wire 129. Between wires 128 and 129 are connected the manual reverse switch 102, a normally open switch 34 of limit switch 34, which is closed to reverse pusher P when switch 34 is tripped, and a holding switch 130 controlled by relay R, which is normally open but is closed when current flows to the reverse winding. From wire 129, a wire 131 leads to reverse winding relay R, through an interlock switch 132, which is normally closed, but is opened by forward winding relay F, when energized, thereby preventing the motor from being accidentally reversed, as by manual switch 102, when the motor is driven forwardly. Also connected in series with reverse winding R, through a wire 133, are the rear limit switches 36 and 38. Connected to switch 34 through wire 127 is a forward series connection wire 135, in parallel with another series connection wire 136, between which are connected foot operated switch 104, manual forward switch 101 and a forward holding switch 137, which is operated by relay F and is normally open but is closed when forward winding relay F is energized. A wire 138 connects wire 136 with forward winding relay F, through an interlock switch 139 which is operated by reverse winding relay R and is normally closed but is opened when reverse winding relay R is energized, to prevent the motor from being accidentally started forward w'nile reversed. From relay R, a wire 140 leads to a junction with wire 133, from which a wire 141 connects with the opposite lead 125, throng-h overload relay switches 142.

In the control circuit for spout motor 65, a wire connects one lead wire 125 with selector switch 107, which. may be moved to a contact 151 to move the spout out to limit switch 110, connected by a wire 152 with contact 151; or to a contact 153 to move the spout back to the position of limit switch 109, connected by a wire 154 with contact 153; or to a contact 155, connected by a wire 156 with the manual or inching control switch 108.- Wire 152 also connects, in series, limit switch 110 and limit switch 111, between selector switch contact 151 and the forward or out control relay F, while wire 154 connects limit switch 109 in series between contact 153 and the reverse or in control relay R. It will be observed that should the spout position be inwardly from the position of limit switch 109, it is necessary to run'thc spout outwardly past limit switch 109 and then move selector switch 107 to contact 153 to position the spout automatically at limit switch 109. However, such operation consumes little time, compared with the set-up time saved. Also, if the spout is at either limit switch 109 or 110 and it is desired to move the spout to the other position, it is sufficient merely to shift the selector switch to the other contact.v

The manual or inching control switch has three positions, i. e., the neutral position shown; a position to one side with a contact 157 engaged so that forward or out relay F will be energized through a wire 158, which leads to a juncture with wire 152 ahead of safety limit switch 111; and a position to the opposite side with a contact 159 engaged so that the reverse or in relay R will be energized through a wire 160, which conveniently leads to a junction with wire 154 between limit switch 109 and relay R. Relay R may be connected by a wire 161, to which is connected a similar wire from relay F, through overload relays 162 with the opposite lead 125.

From the foregoing, it will be evident that the packing apparatus of this invention fulfills to a marked degree the requirements and objects hereinbefore set forth. Although a particular embodiment has been illustrated and described and certain variations therein illustrated, it will be understood that other embodiments may exist and that additional changes may be made, all without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, a spout providing a converging entrance section and having a bottom, sides and a top pivoted about a transverse axis; means for engaging said top to limit upward movement thereof; and means for adjusting said means upwardly and downwardly.

2. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 1, wherein said bottom includesa central fixed plate above a plate at each side which is movable laterally.

3. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 1, wherein said botom is laterally extensible and each side of said spout is attached to a portion of said bottom.

4. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 3, wherein said bottom includes a central fixed plate overlapping a laterally movable plate at each side, each said spout side being attached to one of said movable plates.

5. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 1, wherein said top is pivoted adjacent the rear thereof; and including means for adjusting the elevation of the pivotal axis of said top.

6. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, a spout providing a converging entrance section and having a bottom, sides and a top pivoted about a transverse axis, said top being laterally extensible and 'said bottom and sides being laterally adjustable; and means for moving an article longitudinally into and through said spout.

7. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, a spout providing a converging entrance section and having a bottom, sides and a top pivoted about a transverse axis, said bottom and sides being laterally adjustable .and said top being laterally extensible and including plates which overlap laterally with the lower of said plates being wider at said entrance section and provided with an inner edge which slants in a direction from one side tolongitudinally into and through said spout.

ward the opposite side; and means for moving an article 8. Apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, comprising means providing a horizontal flat surface along which said article may be moved longitudinally; means for guiding said article into a bag; a pusher movable longitudinally along said surface for moving said article to said guiding means and into'said bag; and a plate extending forwardly from said pusher adjacent said surface for supporting at least a portion of said article and movable into said bag with said article.

9. Apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, comprising means providing a horizontal fiat surface along which said article may be moved longitudinally; means for guiding said article into a bag; a pusher movable longitudinally along said surface for moving said article to said guiding means and into said bag; means ex tending laterally fromsaid pusher to each side; and means mounted at each side on said extending means for resisting upward movement of said pusher.

10. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 9, including means mounted on said extending means at each side for resisting lateral movement of said pusher.

11. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 10, wherein each said upward movement resisting means includes a roller rotatable about a horizontal axis; each said lateral movement resisting means includes a roller rotatable about a vertical axis; and mean providing a separate longitudinally extending surface engageable by each said roller.

12. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, a spout providing a converging entrance section and having a bottom, sides and a top pivoted. about a transverse axis; means for engaging said top at a point rearwardly of the forward edge thereof to limit upward movement of said top; and means for engaging a bag placed over the forward end of said spout and holding said bag against said top at a point forwardly of said top engaging means.

13. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 12, wherein said top engaging means extends transversely; and said bag engaging means includes a plate extending forwardly from and attached to said top engaging means, said plate being provided on its underside and adjacent its forward edge with a strip of resilient material.

14. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, a spout providing a converging entrance section and having a bottom, sides and a top pivoted about a transverse axis and including a pair of laterally overlapping plates; a transversely extending lead screw having opposite threads at opposite ends; a transversely extending rod movable to different elevations at different distances from said lead screw; a support for each said plate and movable laterally on said rod; means threadedly engaging each of the respective ends of said lead screw; and extendable and retractable means connecting each said support with the corresponding means engaging said lead screw.

15. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 14, including a frame having sides for supporting said lead screw; a transverse countershaft mounted for pivotal movement on each side of said frame, saidcountershafts being in alignment and disposed in spaced relation to said rod; and an arm connecting each said countershaft with'said rod at least adjacent the opposite ends of said rod.

16. In apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, as defined in claim 15, including a handle lever attached to one said countershaft exteriorly of said frame side; an arcuate slot in said frame side; said lever having a hole therein and said slot corresponding to the movement of said hole as said countershaft is pivoted to different positions by said lever; a removable pin extending through said hole and said slot;,and a series of ferrules, each'having a hole therethrough for receiving said pin and adapted to'be locked at different positions around said slot; 1 I 17. In apparatus for, packing a compressible article into a bag, a spout providing a converging entrance section and having a bottom, sides and a top pivoted about a transverse axis, said bottom including a central fixed plate above a movable plate at each side thereof and said spout sides being attached to said bottom movable plates; a frame for each bottom movable plate and spout side, each said frame extending beneath the respective bottom plate and upwardly and above the outside of the respective spout side; a transverse rod disposed beneath said frames; respective bearing means engaging said rod and attached to each said frame; a transversely extending, rotatable lead screw having oppositely threaded ends and disposed above said spout sides; and means threadedly engaging each of the respectiveends of said lead screw and attached to said frame corresponding thereto.

18. Apparatus for'packing a compressible article into a bag, comprising a table having sides and front and rear ends, said table having a top providing a horizontal surface along which said article may be moved toward said front end; means at the front end of said table for guiding said article into a bag; a channel at each side of said table and having a vertical web and an inwardly extending upper flange, said channel being mounted in laterally spaced relation to said table; a shaft mounted transversely at each end of said table and belowthe top thereof; a sprocket at each end of each said shaft and aligned with the longitudinal space between said channel and respective table side; a reversible motor connected,

withone said shaft; a chain at each side of said table and extending around said sprockets; an angle having a vertical flange beneath the edge of each side of said table and a lower flange extending toward said channel; a plurality of supporting brackets connecting each said channel web and the adjacent lower web of said angle; a pusher having an article engaging front end, a top plate and at least two pairs of rollers for supporting said pusher on said table top for longitudinal movement thereon, the rollers of each pair being laterally spaced and one pair of rollers being forward of the other pair; a transversely extending member disposed longitudinally of said pusher between the respective pairs of rollers and provided at each outer end with a flange extending downwardly into the space between said channel and said table side, the opposite end of each said chain being attached to said downwardly extending flange so as to move said pusher forwardly and rearwardly upon rotation of said one shaft by said motor; aroller mounted on each said pusher member flange and rotatable about a horizontal axis, each said roller engaging the underside of said upper flange of the respective channel; a roller mounted on each said pusher member flange below the point of attachment of the ends of said chain and rotatable about a vertical axis, each said latter roller engaging said vertical flange of said angle beneath said table edge; an auxiliary table mounted on said first mentioned table above the top of the latter, adjacent the rear end thereof; and legs supporting said auxiliary table from said channels so that said pusher may be moved rearwardly beneath said auxiliary table.

19. Apparatus for packing a compressible article into a bag, comprising a'table having sides, ends and a top providing a horizontal surface along which said article may be moved; a pusher for moving said article from the rear toward the front of said top; a housing having side plates extending upwardly from the sides of said table at the front end thereof, front and rear plates extending between said side plates in spaced relation above said table, and a removable top; a spout including a laterally extensible bottom and top and laterally adjustable sides, said spout bottom including a central fixed plate above a movable plate at each side thereof, with said spout sides being attached to said bottom movable plates, said spout'sides having flanges at the rear ends which converge forwardly and the upper edges of said spout sides curving upwardly from the front end, said spout top being pivoted about a transverse axis at the rear end thereof and including a pair of laterally overlapping plates with the lower plate having an inner edge slanting toward the center, and a bracket for each said top plate and having a bearing fork at its upper end; a frame for each bottom movable plate and spout side, each said frame extending beneath the respective bottom plate and upwardly and above the outside of the respective spout side; a transverse rod extending between said housing side plates and disposed beneath said frames; a pair of bearings attached to each said frame and engaging said rod; a transversely extending, rotatable lead screw having oppositely threaded ends mounted between said housing side plates in a central position and disposed above said spout sides; a circular nut threadedly engaging each of the respective ends of said lead screw and attached to said frame corresponding thereto; a transversely extending spout top supporting rod movable to different elevations at different distances from and disposed rearwardly of said lead screw and engaged by said bearing forks for pivotally supporting said spout top; a transverse countershaft mounted for pivotal movement between said housing side plates, said countershafts being in alignment and disposed'rearwardly of and in spaced relation to said lead screw; an arm connecting each said countershaft with said spout top rod at the opposite ends of said rod; a second circular nut threadedly engaging each of the respective ends of said lead screw; a handle lever attached-to one said countershaft exteriorly of said housing side plate; an arcuate slot in said side plate, said lever having a hole therein and said slot corresponding to the movement of said hole as said countershaft is pivoted to different positions by said lever; a removable pin extending through said hole and said slot; a series of ferrules, each having a hole therethrough for receiving said pin and adapted to be locked at different positions around said slot; a rack and a guide tube therefor mounted in vertical position on the inside of said housing front plate at each of two laterally spaced positions; a channel extending transversely and attached to the lower ends of said racks for engaging said spout top to limit upward movement thereof; a shaft extending transversely between said housing side plates and provided with pinions for engaging said racks; a hand wheel attached to the outer end of said pinion shaft exteriorly of said frame side; and means for locking said hand wheel in different adjusted positions.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3390509 *Oct 21, 1965Jul 2, 1968Englander Co IncApparatus for packaging mattresses and the like
US5048265 *Feb 20, 1990Sep 17, 1991Machine Design Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for filling cushions
US7895813 *Nov 6, 2008Mar 1, 2011Primo InternationalMethod for preparing mattresses for shipment
WO1991012994A1 *Feb 20, 1991Sep 5, 1991Mach Design Systems IncMethod and apparatus for filling cushions
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/530, 53/261, 53/258
International ClassificationB65B63/02, B65B63/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B63/026
European ClassificationB65B63/02D