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Publication numberUS2864366 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1958
Filing dateApr 4, 1957
Priority dateApr 4, 1957
Publication numberUS 2864366 A, US 2864366A, US-A-2864366, US2864366 A, US2864366A
InventorsMiskel John J
Original AssigneePfizer & Co C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic syringe adapter
US 2864366 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 16, 1958 MlSKEL 2,864,366

HYPODERMIC SYRINGE ADAPTER Filed April 4, 1957 Jigs INVENTOR John JM islieL ATTORNEYS United States Patent HYPODERMIC SYRINGE ADAPTER John-J. Miskel, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignor to Chas. Pfizer & C0., Brooklyn, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application April 4, 1957, Serial No. 650,642

" 9 Claims. c1. 12s-221 This invention relates to a device for adapting a hypodermic syringe for use with a Luer-type hypodermic needle, and more particularly relates to such a device which also acts as a filter. I

A commonly used type of hypodermic syringe has an internally threaded end for receiving a hypodermic needle including an externally threaded hub. It is :highly desirable to be able to use such a syringe with hypodermic needles of another common type. This widely used additional, type of needle is the Luer-type in which the needle includes a tapered recess which engages the tapered snout of a'Luer-type syringe. It is also desirableto be able to use Luer-type hypodermic needles with disposable cartridges or ampules, for example, of the type described in S. Letters Patent No. 2,672,868 or No. 2,778,360. Although extreme precautions are taken to prevent injected pharmaceutical preparations from becoming contarninated, particles frequently are introduced into the preparation during the administering process. These particles may be introduced, for example, when the stoppers of the vials or cartridges containing the preparations are punctured or, for example, when a breakable membrane between the compartments of a dual compartment cartridge, for example, the glass membrane shown in U. S. Letters Patent No. 2,778,360, is fractured.

An object of this invention is to provide a device for adapting a hypodermic syringe for use with a Luer-type needle;

Another object is to provide such an adapter which prevents the entry of particles into the needle;

Still another object" is to provide such an adapter which permits a Luer-type needle to be used with a sealed ampule; and p A further object is to provide such a device which is simple and economical to manufacture.

Novel features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to one skilled in the art from a reading of the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which similar reference characters refer to similar parts, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a view in elevation partially broken away in cross-section of one embodiment of this invention in conjunction with a hypodermic syringe and a Luer-type needle;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view in elevation of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1;

"Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken through Fig. 2 along the line 33, and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view in elevation of another embodiment of this invention;

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view in elevation of still another embodiment of this invention;

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view in elevation of a further embodiment of this invention;

Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional view in elevation of a portion of a still further embodiment of this invention; and

Fig. 8 is a cross-sectional view in elevation of a portion of still a further embodiment of this invention.

as indicated at 41.

2,864,366 Patented Dec. 16, 1958 "ice In Fig. 1 an adapter 10 is shown coupled to a hypodermic syringe 12 for example, of the type described in U. S. Letters Patent 'No. 2,672,868. Syringe 12 includes a threaded aperture 14 into which the end 16 of the adapter 10 is engaged. End 16 is, for example, externally threaded. A tapered'snout 18 is disposedat the other end of the cylindrical body 20 of adapter 10. A Luertype hypodermic needle 22 is coupled upon tapered snout 18. This demonstrates the manner in which device 10 adapts a hypodermic syringe having an internally threaded aperture for use with a Luer-type needle. The outer surface of body 20 is knurled or roughened as shown at 24 to facilitate handling and attachment. Device 10 also includes, for example, a cartridge-piercing cannula 26 for puncturing a sealed preparation-containing cartridge or ampule 28 of the type shown in U. S. Letters Patent No. 2,672,868 or No. 2,778,360.

Figs. 2 and 3 show details of construction of the device 10 illustrated in Fig. l. A passageway 30, circular in cross-section, for example, and of varying diameter throughout the length of the device extends completely through adapter 10 for conducting the administered 'lluids from the syringe into the Luer-type needle. Filter ele ment 32 is cup-shaped, for example, and it is mounted within a recess 34 provided within the end of tapered snout 18. Filter element 32 is retained within recess 34, for example, by rolling the outeredge 36 of the recess over it. The other end 16 of adapter 10 is externally threaded to engage the internally threaded aperture 14 of the syringe.

,A cartridge-piercing cannula 26 is mounted, for example, within section 38 of passageway 30. Cannula 26 is firmly secured within body 20 by staking, for example, Body 20 also includes an internal cavity 40 which permits mounting of the cannula and filter by other means in a manner later described. This recess or hollow 40 provides a sleeve-shaped end 42 for engaging the syringe. The interior of sleeve 4-2 is internally threaded as Shown at 44 for a purpose which becomes apparent from the following description of modifications of thisi device.

In Fig. 4 a modification 10a is shown in, which filter element 32a is mounted within cavity 48a in body 20a. Filter 32a is also cup-shaped, for example, and is maintained securely in place againstw-all 46aat the' front end of cavity 40a by means of a sleeve 48a inserted after it within cavity 40a.

Sleeve 48a is maintained in firm contact with filter element 32a by means of a plug 50a which is threaded into sleeve-shaped end 42a. A cartridge piercing cannula 26a is mounted, for example, within plug 5% by insertion within a central aperture 52a and staking as shown at 54a.

Fig. 5 shows a modification 10b in which sleeve 48b is disposed in the front of cavity 40b and in contact with Wall 46b. Filter element 32b is incorporated within the front wall of plug 50b whose interior 56b is hollow, for example. Filter el'ement 32b is disc-shaped, for example, and is retained within the front wall of plug 50b by rolling plug edges 58!; over it. Cannula 26b is mounted within aperture 52b and it communicates with the hollow interior 56b of plug 50b.

Fig. 6 shows another embodiment Me in which an elongated filter element 320 is mounted within cavity 400. Filter element 32c is retained in operative position, for example, by a plug 50c which is similar to plug 58a shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 7 shows a portion of a modification 18:! which is similar to the device 10 shown in Figs. 2 and 3 with the exception that filter element 32d is mounted within a cupshaped recess 59d formed about the end of snout 18d. When filter element 32b is slipped over the end of snout 18d, it, therefore, forms a smooth continuation thereof and does not interfere with the coupling of a Luer-type hypodermic needle.

Fig. 8 shows a portion of another modification 102 which is similar to 10d with the exception that the central portion 60 of snout 182 and 62 of filter element 322 are cooperatively centrally indented to assist in retaining filter element 32e upon the end of snout 182. Since filter element 32c as well as the other filter elements shown herein are made of a resilient material such as stainless steel, the outer U-shaped ring 64 of filter element 32c securely grasps the annular projection 66 formed between recesses 60 and 59e at the end of snout 182.

What is claimed is:

l. A device for adapting a hypodermic syringe for use with a Luer-type hypodermic needle comprising a substantially cylindrical body including a passageway extending longitudinally completely through it, a coupling means disposed upon one end of said body for engaging said syringe, a tapered snout on the opposite end of said body for engaging said Luer-type hypodermic needle, a filter element disposed upon said device and within said passageway for preventing the entry of particles into said hypodermic needle, said filter element being cup-shaped, and the outer end of said tapered snout being recessed for mounting said filter element with its outer surface providing a smooth continuation of said snout.

2. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein central portions of said filter element and said end of said snout are cooperatively indented to assist in retaining said filter element upon said end.

3. A device for adapting a hypodermic syringe for use with a Luer-type hypodermic needle comprising a substantially cylindrical body including a passageway extending longitudinally completely through it, a coupling means disposed upon one end of said body for engaging said syringe, a tapered snout on the opposite end of said body for engaging said Luer-type hypodermic needle, a filter element disposed upon said device and within said passageway for preventing the entry of particles into said hypodermic needle, the coupling end of said body being hollow to provide a sleeve-shaped end, said sleeve-shaped end being externally threaded for engagement with an internally threaded hypodermic syringe, said filter element being mounted within said hollow body, said filter element being short relative to the length of the hollow portion of said body, and a spacer sleeve is inserted within said body in contact with said filter element to maintain it in operative position.

4 4. A device as set forth in claim 3 wherein a plug is mounted within the sleeve-shaped end of said device for maintaining said filter in its operative position.

5. A device as set forth in claim 4 wherein a cartridge-piercing cannula is mounted within said plug.

6. A device as set forth in claim 5 wherein the inner circumference of said sleeve-shaped end and the outer said hypodermic needle, the coupling end of said body being hollow to provide a sleeve-shaped end, said sleeveshaped end being externally threaded for engagement with an internally threaded hypodermic syringe, a plug being mounted within said sleeve-shaped end, said plug being hollow, a cartridge-piercing needle being mounted upon the outer end of said plug, and a filter element is mounted upon the inner end of said plug.

8. A device for adapting a hypodermic syringe for use with a Luer-type hypodermic needle comprising a substantially cylindrical body including a passageway extending longitudinally completely through it, a coupling means disposed upon one end of said body for engaging said syringe, a tapered snout on the opposite end of said body for engaging said Luer-type hypodermic needle, a filter element disposed upon said deviceand within said passageway for preventing the entry of particles into said hypodermic needle, and said filter element is mounted within a recess formed within the end of said I snout.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Hein Aug. 4, 1931 Miskel Jan. 22, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1817003 *Apr 26, 1924Aug 4, 1931Hein George NHypodermic syringe
US2778360 *May 9, 1955Jan 22, 1957Pfizer & Co CHypodermic syringe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3757780 *Nov 4, 1971Sep 11, 1973Ishikawa Susakusho KkNeedle assembly with longitudinally movable filter
US3859999 *May 31, 1973Jan 14, 1975Ishikawa Manufacturing CoFilter and needle assembly incorporating the filter
US3933652 *Apr 25, 1973Jan 20, 1976Sherwood Medical Industries Inc.Process of manufacturing a porous, stainless steel filter element and sealing it in a tubular fitting, and resulting filter
US4043335 *Aug 13, 1976Aug 23, 1977Soji IshikawaNeedle holder device of medical administrating injector
US4066079 *Nov 3, 1976Jan 3, 1978Chiarolla Victor DFilter needle
US4133314 *Dec 6, 1976Jan 9, 1979American Hospital Supply CorporationExtension transfer set
US4200096 *Jun 8, 1977Apr 29, 1980Guy CharvinDevice for introducing a liquid other than blood in a blood vessel
US4684365 *Oct 10, 1985Aug 4, 1987Eaton CorporationDisposable refill unit for implanted medication infusion device
US5290253 *Nov 2, 1992Mar 1, 1994Terumo Kabushiki KaishaCap for medical tool connection and medical tool
US8002751Oct 17, 2007Aug 23, 2011Sue CarrFilter needle
US8672883Jul 11, 2012Mar 18, 2014C. Garyen DenningFluid delivery device and methods
US20130116617 *Jul 22, 2010May 9, 2013Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNeedle assembly for mixing of substances
WO2010075920A1 *Nov 30, 2009Jul 8, 2010Synovamed AgCylinder ampoule syringe having an injection cannula and a penetrating cannula
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/190, 604/243
International ClassificationA61M5/31, A61M5/24
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/3145, A61M5/24, A61M5/347
European ClassificationA61M5/24