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Publication numberUS2864613 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1958
Filing dateJun 14, 1957
Priority dateJun 14, 1957
Publication numberUS 2864613 A, US 2864613A, US-A-2864613, US2864613 A, US2864613A
InventorsPorter Ernest C
Original AssigneePorter Ernest C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Airplane toy amusement device for a child
US 2864613 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 16, 1958 E. c. PORTER AIRPLANE TOY AMUSEMENT DEVICE FOR A CHILD Filed June 14, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 FILG.8.

INVENTOR 22 ERNEST C. PORTER BY ATTORNEY Dec. 16, 1958 E. c. PORTER 2,864,613

AIRPLANE TOY AMUSEMENT DEVICE-FOR A CHILD Filed June 14, 1957 Y I 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENT OR a} C .PORTER Wow ATTORNEY Dec. 16, 1958 E. c. PORTER 2,864,613

AIRPLANE TOY AMUSEMENT DEVICE FOR A CHILD Filed June 14, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 ERNEST C PORTER ATTORNEY Dec. 16, 1958 E. c. PORTER 2,864,613

AIRPLANE TOY AMUSEMENT DEVICE FOR A CHILD I Filed June 14, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United States Patent AIRPLANE TOY AMUSEMENT DEVICE FOR A CHILD Emest C. Porter, Atascadero, Calif.

Application June 14, 1957, Serial No. 665,717

2 Claims. (Cl. 272-1) This invention relates to an airplane toy amusement device and more particularly to a hollow airplane-like structure which may be carried by the child on his shoulders and with his hands with his head extending into the hollow structure so that he can see through at least an open front thereof and run about and play and simulate the operation of an airplane.

A further object of this invention is to provide an airplane toy amusement device which may be made to simulate substantially any type of airplane, including both the propeller driven type and a rocket or jet driven type.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide an airplane toy amusement device for use by a child, wherein the device may be provided with simulated airplane instruments that are actually operative to indicate climb or dive as well as for turn or bank to thus increase the pleasure of the child operator.

Yet a further object of this invention is to provide an airplane toy amusement device carried on the shoulders and about the head of the child, which, in the propeller type of airplane, a propeller is provided which is operable under the pressure of wind created by the child while running, and in addition may also be provided with a noise-making device under the control of the child operator and operable in cooperation with the rotation of the propeller.

Briefly, this airplane toy amusement device is constructed in simulation of an airplane with its bottom open and the side walls of the fuselage recessed so as to fit comfortably on the shoulders of the child, a pair of grip handles being provided forwardly of the recessed sides of the fuselage for comfortable manipulation by the child, the sides and front of the fuselage being open and overlooking simulated wings and simulated fuselage nose, and in the propeller type, being provided with a propeller that may spin freely in wind pressure and may cooperate with a noise maker under the control of the child for simulating airplane sound effects.

With the above and related objects in view, this invention consists in the details of construction and combination of parts, as will be more fully understood from the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is an upper perspective View of one form of the invention in use.

Fig. 2 is a similar upper perspective view of another form of this invention in use.

Fig. 3 is a lower perspective view of the form of invention shown in Fig. 1. 1

Fig. 4 is a typical plan view of the left side developed blank of low wing form.

Fig. 5 is a plan view of developed blank of the left side of a wing section.

Fig. 6 is a plan view piece.

, Fig. 7 is an elevation of the stabilizer and elevator of a fuselage window reinforcing tail section.

Patented Dec. 16, 1958 Fig. 8 shows an elevation of a strut section.

Fig. 9 is an exploded perspective view of an assembly of the parts.

Fig. 10 is a schematic perspective detail of the triggering mechanism cooperating with the propeller for providing noise effects.

- stapled in position.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary perspective view of the fuselage cabin showing optional operable instruments.

Fig. 12 is a front elevational view of an instrument panel.

Fig. 13 is a perspective sectional view partly in elevation of operable instruments.

Figs. 14, 15 and 16 are fragmentary cross-sectional views through the climb and dive indicator, showing the same in level, climb, and dive positions.

Figs. 17 and 18 are schematic top plan and side elevational views of the low-winged monoplane form shown in Figs. 1 and 3.

Figs. 19 and 20 are similar views of the low-winged monoplane open cockpit type shown in Fig. 2.

Figs. 21 and 22 are similar views of a high-wing monoplane type.

Figs. 23 and 24 are similar views of a jet type of airplane.

Figs. 25 and 26 are similar views of a rocket type of airplane.

Fig. 27 is a plan view of the developed blank of the left hand side of the low wing monoplane open cockpit type shown in Figs. 19 and 20.

There is shown at 10 one form of the airplane toy amusement device of this invention, this form 10 representing a low winged monoplane cabin type of airplane. This device 10 is in the form of a hollow airplane-like structure and includes a fuselage 12 consisting of opposite side walls 14 which merge together at their rear into a tail 16. Extending from the rear end of the side 14 to opposite sides of the tail 16 is the stabilizer section 18 from which extends the elevator portions 20, the elevator portions 20 extending on each side of the tail or vertical stabilizer 16.

Secured to the sides 14 by means of strut sections 22 are wing portions 24 each including a simulated aileron 26.

Extending forwardly from the fuselage provided by the sides 14 is the nose 28, it being observed from Fig. 4 that the nose 28 blank is integral with the blank forming the side sections 14, and that when the two blanks are placed together and the portions folded over along the fold lines provided as shown, the nose 28 is thereby provided. The sides 14 and wings 24 are each provided with strut holes 30 and 37 for receiving the securing tabs 34 of the struts 22 therein, the same being taped or Similarly, the side 14 is provided with wing holes 36 and 38 for receiving wing tabs 42 and 44 to be secured therein in a similar manner.

The cabin sides 14 are each provided with side window openings 46, and reinforcing bars 48 may be provided about these window openings for additional strength if desired, as shown in Fig. 6. Extending above the window 46 is the roof 50 being spaced above the window opening 46 and above the nose 28 thus providing an open windshield 52 providing forward and sideways lines of .struts, stabilizer, elevator and so forth are made of very inexpensive sheet material, such as paper board or cardboard having sufficient stiffness to maintain its shape when folded and secured in position. The two opposite sides and various parts will be assembled together as obvious from Fig. 9, the nose portions 28 being telescoped together just as the roof portions 50 are telescoped together and then secured together by stapling, taping, or any similar conventional method. When securing the nose portions 28 together, a frusto-pyramid block 60 is provided to go inside of the nose portion and a nose plate 62 is secured over the outside thereof, the block 60 and plate 62 both being apertured at 64 and 66 to provide a bearing shaftway through which extends a propeller shaft 68 on which a propeller blade 70 may spin freely under wind pressure in operation. Suitable washers 72 and 74 are provided on opposite sides of the block 60 and a cotter pin 76 holds the end of the propeller shaft 68 imposition.

A reinforcing bar 78 extends across the rear bottom portion of the nose 28 and is secured thereto and has depending ferrules 80 secured thereon by screws 82 and on the ferrules 80 there are secured handle grips 84 in spaced apart relationship beneath the bottom of the fuselage at the rear of the nose portion.

The propeller 70 includes a propeller hub 86 provided with one or more radial ribs 88 for cooperation with a resilient but somewhat stiff clicker finger 90 mounted on the forward end of a connecting shaft 92 having a bearing through a tab 94 of nose plate 62, the connecting shaft 92 extending through a suitable opening in one side of the nose portion 28, and being pivoted to one end of a trigger 96 pivoted at 98 and located so as to be closely adjacent one of the hand grips 84 so that when the childs hand is holding the hand grip 84, his finger may operate the trigger 96 as desired. A spring 100 is mounted within the nose and secured to the trigger 96 so as to bias the trigger to pull the clicker 90 to the non-operative position, so that no noise will be produced thereby unless the child is maintaining tension on the trigger 96.

An instrument panel 102 is provided within the fuselage extending across the bottom of the open windshield 52 and across the top of the rear of the nose portion 28 so as to be in the line of vision of the child operator 54 when he looks through the open windshield 52. Mounted on and visible through the instrument panel 102 are two simulated airplane instruments 104 and 106, both these simulated instruments being actually operable, the airplane instrument 104 being a climb and dive instrument, as shown in more details in Figs. 14, 15, and 16, consisting of a ball 108 provided with appropriate indicia 110 and mounted in a wire frame 112 and provided with a weight 114 at the bottom thereof causing the ball 108 to pivot axially about its horizontal axis 116 of frame 112 and thus have its indicia 110 cooperate with the pointers 118 for indicating degrees of dive or climb.

The turn and bank indicator instrument 106 includes an indicia plate 120 at the bottom of which is journaled an arrow pointer 122 having a weight 124 at the bottom end thereof and anindicating pointer 125 at the top thereof so that as the indicia plate 120 is tilted one side or the other through tilting of the toy amusement device, the indicator 122 will shift one side or the other to indicate the amount of turn or bank as at 126.

In operation, assembled in a manner obvious from the foregoing description, the device is used by a child by grasping the hand grips 84 and placing the hollow portion of the fuselage over his head so that he can see through the front or side windows, the sides 14 having recessed edges 130 so spaced from the handle grips 84 that the fuselage will rest with the recessed edges 130 on the shoulder of the child operator while his hand grasps the handle grips 84. He may then run about, and as he does so, wind pressure. created by his movement will cause his airplane propeller 72 to rotate, and if the child pulls the trigger 96, the clicker 90 will be in the path of rotation of the ribs 88 on the hub of the propeller 70 and 4 make a noise simulating an airplane satisfactory to a child.

Being made of light-weight material such as cardboard, plastic or the like, the entire device 10 is very light in weight but the exercise stimulated by the use thereof while satisfactory to a child, can be too much for an adult.

The instruments 104 and 106 will move under the stimulation of the weight 114 and 124 due to the action of gravity, so that as the child curves and changes direction, the instruments will actually indicate the curves in one direction or the other, and likewise will indicate dive or climb as the child elevates or depresses the nose of the toy.

As shown, simulated gun barrels 132 may be provided on each side of the nose or in any other suitable location. As shown, the same principles of this invention may be applied in making up any other type of airplane. Thus, in Figs. 2, l9, and 20, a low-winged monoplane 134 is shown provided with an open cockpit 136, a windshield of transparent plastic 138 may be provided in place of an open windshield so as to carry out the simulation.

Obviously, plastic Windshields may be provided in each and every type of airplane herein illustrated or made within the scope of this invention. Inasmuch as the other parts of the open cockpit plane 134 are substantially identical with those of the cabin type of plane just described, no further description thereof is necessary.

In Figs. 21 and 22, a high-wing monoplane cabin type of airplane toy amusement device 140 is shown provided with a high wing 142 extending over the roof of the fuselage 144, both airplane devices 134 and 140 each being provided with a spinning propeller 70 just as in the lowwinged monoplane device shown at 10.

In Figs. 23 and 24, a jet type of airplane is shown at being provided with partly swept-back wings 152 and swept-back stabilizer 154.

In Figs. 25 and 26, a rocket type of airplane amusement device i shown at with sharply swept-back wings 162, and stabilizer 164. The jet type at 150 and rocket type at 160 obviously omit the spinning propeller and noise maker that goes with it, but otherwise it is identical in construction with the previously described forms, having the same hand grips 84 and the shoulder supported recessed edges 130 of the side walls of the fuselage.

In Fig. 27 there is shown a plan view of a developed blank of the left-hand side of the open cockpit plane shown at 134 in Figs. 2, 19 and 20. This side blank being provided with folding nose portions 172 and stabilizer 171 and is provided with suitable slots for receiving the tabs from struts, wings and stabilizer portions in the same manner as previously described.

Although this invention has been described in considerable detail, such description is intended as being illustrative rather than limiting, since the invention may be variously embodied, and the scope of the invention is to be determined as claimed.

Having thus set forth and disclosed the nature of this invention, what is claimed is:

1. An airplane amusement device for a child comprising a hollow airplane-like structure having a fuselage comprising side walls merging together at their rear into a tail, an airplane nose extending forwardly from and secured to said side walls, airplane wing means extending from said fuselage, a propeller shaft extending forwardly from said nose, a simulated airplane propeller rotatably mounted on said shaft for rotation by'wind pressure, an instrument panel extending between said side walls at the junction of said side walls and said nose, simulated instruments mounted on said instrument panel, one of said panel instruments being a dive and climb indicator comprising a weighted ball pivoted on a transverse axis means fixed relative to said panel, climb and dive indicia on said ball, pointer means fixed relative to said panel cooperating with said climb and dive indicia on said ball as said panel tilts fore and aft, the other of said panel instruments being a turn and bank indicator comprising a plate fixed relative to said panel, turn and bank indicia on said plate and a bottom weighted pointer journaled relative to said plate and having a top pointer end cooperating with said turn and bank indicia as said panel tilts sideways, handle grips extending downwardly from the rear bottom of said nose, curvilinear recesses in the bottom edges of each said side wall spaced rearwardly from said handle grips whereby said handle grips may be grasped by the hands of a child While the wall edges of the curvilinear recesses support the fuselage on the shoulders of the child with the head of the child extending into the hollow fuselage, the front of said fuselage at least being transparent for vision therethrough, and sound producing means under the control of the child operator comprising a trigger lever spring biased to non-operating position pivoted through the bottom of the nose to a location adjacent one handle grip, a connecting shaft pivoted at one end to said trigger lever and provided at the other end with a noise making element extendable into the path of a rotating part of said propeller to make a noise while the propeller is rotating, whereby the child carries said device on his shoulders about his head by grasping the handle grips and simulates the action of an airplane sighting through the front of the fuselage above the instrument panel with the instruments also in his line of vision, and may operate the trigger lever to produce an airplane simulating noise in cooperation with the propeller spinning under wind pressure.

2. An airplane toy amusement device for a child comprising a hollow airplane-like structure having a fuselage comprising side walls merging together at their rear, a tail extending therefrom, an airplane nose extending forwardly from and secured to said side walls, a roof supported above said side walls and said nose, airplane wing means extending from said fuselage, a propeller shaft extending forwardly from said nose, a simulated airplane propeller rotatably mounted on said shaft for rotation by wind pressure, an instrument panel extending between said side walls at the junction of said side walls and said nose, simulated operative dive and climb and turn and bank instruments mounted on said instrument panel,

spaced apart handle grips extending downwardly from the bottom of said nose, curvilinear recesses in the bot-' tom edges of each said side wall spaced rearwardl from said handle grips whereby said handle grips may be grasped by the hands of a child while the wall edges of the curvilinear recesses support the fuselage on the shoulders of the child with the head of the child extending into the hollow fuselage, the front and sides of said fuselage beneath said roof and above said nose be-' ing open for vision therethrough, and sound producing means under the control of the child operator comprising a trigger lever spring biased to non-operating position pivoted through the bottom of the nose to a location adjacent one handle grip, a connecting shaft pivoted at one end to said trigger lever and provided at the other end with noise making element extendable into the path of a rotating part of said propeller to make a noise while the propeller is rotating, whereby the child carries said device on hisshoulders about his head by grasping the handle grips and simulates the action of an airplane sighting, through the front of the fuselage above the instrument panel, with the instruments also in his line of vision, and may operate the trigger lever to produce an airplane simulatng noise in cooperation with the propeller I spinning under wind pressure.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,728,245 Merritt Sept. 17, 1929 2,258,531 Baldwin ..1 Oct.,7, 1941 2,497,527 Bacon Feb, 14, 1950 2,707,102 Wendt Apr. 26, 1955 2,738,974 Vincent Mar. 20, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1728245 *Apr 6, 1928Sep 17, 1929Merritt Benjamin CAeroplane toy
US2258531 *Mar 20, 1941Oct 7, 1941Baldwin Janice LAmusement device for small children
US2497527 *Apr 2, 1947Feb 14, 1950Bacon Emma OmarToy airplane headband
US2707102 *Aug 28, 1951Apr 26, 1955Wendt Robert HToy riding horses
US2738974 *Jan 21, 1954Mar 20, 1956Simon VincentToy riding horse
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3009698 *Apr 15, 1960Nov 21, 1961Killius Charles HToy wings
US3010718 *Dec 19, 1958Nov 28, 1961Marvin I GlassToy
US3047302 *Oct 4, 1960Jul 31, 1962Constantin A KrylovPropelling device for skiers and the like
US3199867 *May 22, 1961Aug 10, 1965Pembridge David RRiding game device
US4167830 *May 6, 1977Sep 18, 1979Takara Co., Ltd.Random indicator amphibious vehicle assembly
US4288943 *Dec 5, 1979Sep 15, 1981Ptaszek George WSimulated firing and sighting system
US4407494 *Aug 20, 1981Oct 4, 1983Hummel David MToy aircraft
US5895893 *May 2, 1997Apr 20, 1999Mcmillian; JohnMobile scale
US6688937 *Jun 30, 2000Feb 10, 2004Yu-Chi TsaiSemi-scale toy plane
US7311578 *Dec 16, 2004Dec 25, 2007Stanley Stephen CRiding toy
US8286266 *Jul 24, 2009Oct 16, 2012Silvertop Associates, Inc.Magazine cover costume
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/28, 116/215, D21/420, 446/487
International ClassificationA63H33/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/00
European ClassificationA63H33/00