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Publication numberUS2865112 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1958
Filing dateNov 16, 1955
Priority dateNov 16, 1955
Publication numberUS 2865112 A, US 2865112A, US-A-2865112, US2865112 A, US2865112A
InventorsRichard J Annesser
Original AssigneeDow Chemical Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sealing orifice for steam tubes and the like
US 2865112 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1958 R, ss 2,865,112

SEALING ORIFICEFOR STEAM TUBES AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 16. 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet l 15 L L /15 I 55 52 i I l g -50 22 I 54 IN V EN TOR. R/cAa/v J fin/7 esser' Dec. 23, 1958 R. J. ANNESSER SEALING ORIFICE FOR STEAM TUBES AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 1a. 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR. R/ch arc J flnnesser FTTOR/VEKS United States Patent Ofihce Patented Dec. 23, 1958 SEALING ORIFICE FOR STEAM TUBES AND THE LIKE Richard J. Annesser, Richmond, Calif., assignor to The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Micln, a corporation of Delaware Application November '16, 1955, Serial No. 547,175 11 Claims. c1. 34-,242

This invention relates to a sealing orifice for steam tubes and equivalent enclosures wherein steam or another gaseous fluid is maintained under pressure for contacting running lengths of strandular material, such as a bundle or tow of textile fibers, being passed through the enclosure to receive a desired treatment during which it is subjected to the fluid.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an orifice for steam tubes and the like which will permit the free lengthwise passage of strandular material through the tube while restricting the escape of steam or other gaseous fluid under pressure from the tube. a

It is a further object of theinvention' to provide a sealing orifice for steam tubes and the like which conveniently permits ready entry and passage of strandular material into and through the steam tube.

A still'further object of the invention is to provide a sealing orifice which can efiiciently accommodate the passage of different sized strandular material through the steam tube.

Another-object of the invention is to provide a sealing orifice which provides for greater efficiency in the operation of steam tubes and the like.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a sealing orifice which permits greater economy to be realized in the operation of steam tubes and'the like.

It is an'associated object to provide a sealing orifice by means of which steam and the like escaping from confinement at relatively higher pressures may conveniently be directed for subsequent employment under a' lower pressure.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a sealing orifice that is especially suited for retarding the escape of steam from steam tubes being employed to stretch continuous running lengths of synthetic and artificial textile fibers for purposes of orientation and the like.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a sealing orifice which readily facilitates the regulation of pressures within a steam tube or the like at uniform and constantly maintained values within a desired range.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a sealing orifice for steam tubes and thelike' which is particularly well adapted for employment in an apparatus capable of treating continuous running lengths of synthetic and artificial textile fibers, through sequential zones wherein the steam or other treating fluid is maintained in each zone under different pressures.

According to the present invention, these and other objects which hereinafter will be apparent may be obtained with apparatus which comprises a hollow, openended body; a plurality of aligned apertures positioned at intervals within said body and disposed to provide an internal passageway therethrough; an outlet for fluid in said body positioned between apertures along the passageway through said body; and, advantageously, means for varying the'size of the apertures in said body.

Other features and advantages will also be apparent in connection with the following description and the drawing, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts, which represent an embodiment of the invention, wherein:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a sealing orifice according to the present invention, attached to an extremity of a steam tube;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the orifice with part of the cover plate removed;

Figure 3 is a sectional elevation of the apparatus taken along the section line 33'in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary section view of part of the apparatus, taken along the section line 4-4 in Figure 2, showing a means for varying the orifice size;

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the apparatus with the cover plate removed; and

Figure 6 is a schematic representation of astretching unit for textile fibers having steam tubes provided with sealing orifices in accordance with the present invention.

Referring initially to the first three Figures of the drawing, there is illustrated a'sealing orifice, indicated generally by the reference numeral 9, which is comprised of a mounting bracket or base plate 10 having its front and rear edges upwardly extending to form front and rear lips 14 and 21 respectively. The'front lip 14 of the base plate 10 has a central opening, which is more apparent in Figure 5, for admitting strandular material to the sealing orifice. A pair of adjacent, non-contiguous, generally rectangular blocks 15 and 22 are mounted in a parallel, jaw-like relationship on the base plate 10, extending between and being confined by the lips 14 and 21. A cover plate 12 is fastened to the base plate 10 over the blocks 15 and 22 by bolts 13 threaded in tapped holes 11 on each corner of the base plate in the upwardly extending lips 14 and 21.

Projecting from the rear edge of the base plate 10 is a neck portion 34 provided with a central channel 35 which passes through the rear lip 21 of the base plate 10 to terminate between the base plate and the cover plate 12. The channel 35 is tapped to permit mounting the sealing orifice 9 on the threaded end of a steam tube 36 (partially shown) or the like. Other coupling means such as flange or welding fittings may also be employed for fastening the sealing orifice to a steam tube or other desired equipment. Thus, the combination of the base plate 10, the spaced blocks 15 and 22, and the cover plate 12 may readily be seen, upon assembly of the mentioned components in the present apparatus 9, to comprise and provide a hollow body which is open at each of its longitudinal ends, as in and through the central opening in the front lip 14 of the base plate 10 at one end of the sealing orifice and in and through the channel 35 at its opposite end.

The orifice block 15 is stationarily fixed on the base plate 10 by any suitable means. For example, mounting studs (not shown) which project from the base plate into the apertures 16 in the block 15 may be employed for this purpose as may be bolts or other fastening means.

Or, if desired, the block 15 may be welded or fixed permanently to the base plate 10 by other means or may be made. integral with the base plate. The inner side of the block is formed to have a plurally indented contour by being provided with a plurality of generally rectangular partitions 17 which are equally dimensioned with one another and of the same height as the block. Usually it is desirable for the partitions 17 to be at equally spaced intervals along the block 15 and to extend substantially perpendicularly from it.

Preferably the orifice block 22 is movably positioned on the base plate 10 to slide between the confining lips 14 and 21. Its inner edge is plurally indented similarly to the block 15 by being provided with a plurality of generally rectangular, equally dimensioned, perpendicularly extending partitions 27 which are spaced along the block to match opposite the similar and corresponding partitions 17 on the stationary block 15. The movable block 22 may advantageously be provided on its upper side with lengthwise grooves 23, which are also shown in crosssection in Figure 4, to receive gasket strips 24. These provide an efficient sealing means between the movable block 22 and the cover plate 12.

The non-contiguous opposing partitions 17 and 27 are juxtapositioned to form an aligned plurality of individual apertures 29 which provide a passageway between and through the adjacent blocks 15 and 22 leading from the central opening in the front lip 14 of the base plate 19 to the channel 35 in the neck portion 34 of the base plate. The juxtaposed edges of the partitions 17 and 27 may be shaped in any manner to provide apertures 29 having the most desirable configuration for effecting minimum clearance with the strandular material being passed through the sealing orifice. Frequently, as illustrated, the partitions may be straight edged to form substantially rectangular apertures 29. Such a configuration is often advantageous for accommodating relatively flat, ribbonlike tows or bundles of textile fibers being passed through the sealing orifice. However, the partitions may also be provided with curvilinear juxtaposed edges to form iris-like and even more nearly circular apertures through the sealing orifice if they are desired.

The indented side contours of the blocks 15 and 22 form a consecutive plurality of chambers 28 which are separated by the matching, opposed partitions 17 and 27 and which are in sequential communication with one another through the plurality of apertures 29. At least one and preferably all of the chambers 28 are provided with vents or drain outlets 18 which extend through the block 15. These may be left open or may be tapped at their extremities to accommodate closure plugs 19 or a connecting nipple 20 through which steam or other fluid can be recovered for subsequent use. Or, if desired, compressed airand the like may be admitted through one or more of the vents to assist in retarding the escape of steam from the steam tube or to facilitate directing its passage out of the sealing orifice through another vent outlet.

While alternatively, if preferred, the orifice block 22 may also be stationarily positioned on the base plate so that a passageway having a fixed opening is provided through the apertures 29, it is usually more desirable for it to be movably mounted. This allows the opening of the passageway between the apertures 29 to be readily varied to facilitate the threading up or initial passing of strandular material through the apparatus and to accommodate more efficiently the passage of strandular material of any particular dimension. Greater flexibility and utility may thus be provided for in the sealing orifice.

A suitable means for moving the block 22 to provide a variable opening sealing orifice may be obtained with a cylindrical, rotatable cam member 31 mounted eccentrically about a pivot and positioned in a slot-like striker opening 30 in the block 15. The cam member 31, as shown more clearly in Figure 4, may be pivotally mounted by any suitable means (not shown) to the base plate 10. An integral head 32 extends from the cam member 31 through an access hole 33 in the cover plate 12 to permit the cam member to be turned with a wrench or other instrument. When the cam member 31 is turned, it moves eccentrically about its mounting axis against the edge of the striker opening 33 to laterally move the block 22 to any desired position. Such a position may be as indicated by the phantom lines 27A, 30A and 22A in Figure 4 which outline the block in a moved position when the cam member 31 is turned to widen the apertures 29. The block 22, as indicated by the directional arrows in Figures 4 and 5, is moved by the cam member 31 in a perpendicular direction towards or away from the stationary block 15 to vary the opening of the apertures 29 and, as a consequence, the strandular material accommodating opening of the sealing orifice in any desired manner.

In operation, the block 22 may advantageously be moved away from the block 15 to widen the apertures 29 when strandular material 45, as shown in Figure 5, is being initially threaded through the sealing orifice. After the strandular material 45 has been threaded through the sealing orifice, the block 22 may be moved back towards the block 15 to obtain a minimum clearance through the apertures for the strandular material. This increases the efficiency of the apparatus in retarding the escape of steam or other fluid from the steam tube through the alternately consecutive plurality of expansion chambers and flow restricting apertures in the sealing orifice.

As mentioned, at least one of the outlets 18 from the chambers 28 may be utilized for venting steam or other fluid escaping from the steam tube to assist in regulating the pressure within the tube or to direct it through suitable conduits for further subsequent use. Usually it is advantageous to employ a vent outlet near the entry to the sealing orifice for this purpose. However, any of the vent outlets 18 may, as desired, either be left open to the atmosphere sealed, or employed for attaching such instruments as pressure gages and the like. One or more of them may also, as indicated, be kept full of compressed air to further restrict the escaping flow of steam from the steam tube or to direct its passage through another desired outlet for recovery.

Sealing orifices according to the present invention can advantageously be employed with a steam tube in which it is desired to maintain steam under relatively high, non-varying pressures for purposes of treating bundles or tows of continuous filament artificial or synthetic textile fibers being passed through the steam tube, as in stretchd rawing operations at elevated temperatures. They are also well suited for employment in apparatus wherein the strandular material is passed through a desired plurality of sequential treating zones in the presence of steam which is maintained under a different pressure in each zone. Such an arrangement is schematically illustrated in Figure 6. The three consecutively arranged steam tubes 36A, 36B and 360 are provided at each of their ends with the sealing orifices 9A, 9B and 9C respectively. Relatively high pressure steam, admitted through the steam inlet 38 to the last consecutively arranged steam tube 36A, is exhausted through vent outlets in the sealing orifices 9A to be directed through the conduit 39 to provide relatively medium pressure steam for the preceding steam tube 36B in the consecutive arrangement. The medium pressure steam from the steam tube 36B is exhausted through the vent outlet in the sealing orifices 913 to be directed through the conduit 40 to provide relatively low pressure steam for the first steam tube 360 in the consecutive arrangement. The strandular material 45 being passed sequentially through the consecutively arranged steam tubes 36C, 36B and 36A and around the associated guide rollers 41 and 42 is first subjected to the low pressure steam in the first steam tube 360; then to the medium pressure steam in steam tube 363; and finally to the high pressure steam in the last consecutively arranged tube 36A. Advantageously a sequential series of stretch-drawing operations can be performed on the strandular material during its passage through the consecutively connected pairs of steam tubes, although other treatments such as heat treatments and the like may also be performed in this manner. As is apparent the consecutive arrangement of the tubes and the steam recovery sequence between consecutive pairs of tubes as well as the passing order of the strandular maaseaiie terial through the various tubes and the number of tubes so employed can be modified in any desired manner.

The employment of sealing orifices according to the present invention will be further illustrated by the following examples.

Example I by weight of vinylidene chloride in the polymer molecule) and about 30 percent by weight of cellulose acetate. In a series of runs, stretches were imparted to the fiber which varied from about 4.5 to 6.0 times at temperatures which varied from about 108 to 124 C. under steam pressures in the steam tube which varied from about 3.5 to. 18 pounds per square-inch. In each case, the fiber was easily initially threaded through the apparatus and the desired operating conditions were readily maintained constant in the steam tube. Oriented fibers having excellent properties with respect to tenacity, elongation, shrinkage and denier uniformity were thereby produced without operational difficulties. The overall consumption of steam during the stretching operations was slight. The pressure and temperature variations within the steam tube are negligible.

Example II A wet-spun synthetic fiber comprised of a copolymer of vinylidene chloride and acrylonitrile which contained about 60 percent by weight of vinylidene chloride in the polymer molecule was oriented by being stretchedin the presence of steam in three successive stages. In each of the stages the steam was maintained under a progressively greater pressure. Three separate steam tubes were employed for this purpose. Each of the steam tubes was provided at both ends with sealing orifices similar to that described in connection with Figures 1-5. There were eight consecutive chambers in each of the sealing orifices. The seventh chamber from the end of the steam tube was vented to the atmosphere in all of the sealing orifices. Steam was supplied to the first of the tubes at atmospheric pressure to attain a temperature of about 100 C. It was provided at about 12 p. s. i. g. to the second tube to effect a temperature of about 118 C. and at about 31 p. s. i. g. to the third tube to efiect a temperature of about 135.5 C. therein. The fiber, which was easily threaded through the apparatus, was stretched about twice in the first tube, twice in the second tube and 2.4 times in the third tube.

It had excellent and consistently uniform physical properties as a result of being processed under constant and non-varying conditions. Steam losses from the steam tubes were extremely low.

The foregoing procedure was repeated excepting that the eighth chamber from the end of the steam tube in both sealing orifices on the first tube containing the lowest pressure steam was left open to the atmosphere while the eighth chamber from the end of the steam tube in both sealing orifices on the second tube containing the medium pressure steam was filled with compressed air under a lesser pressure than that of the steam in the tube. Similarly, the eighth chamber from the end of the steam tube in both sealing orifices on the third tube containing the high pressure steam was filled with compressed air under a pressure less than that of the steam in the tube. Steam was likewise supplied to the first of the tubes at atmospheric pressure, to the second at about 12 p. s. i. g. and to the third at about 31 p. s. i. g. The fiber, stretched in the same manner through the constant and non-varying conditions in the steam tubes, also had excellent and consistently uniform properties. The steam consumption by the tubes was very low over unit periods of operation. This procedure was repeated on additional fiber tows with the steam pressure in the first tube being Varied from atmospheric to about 1.5 p. s. i. g.; that in the second tube being varied from about 12 to 21 p. s. i. g.; and the steam pressure in the third tube from about 30 to 35 p. s. i.,g.- In all cases the desired pressure in each of the tubes was maintained at a constant level over extended periods of operations. As a consequence, uniformly processed fibers having consistently good physical properties were readily obtained.

Example III Several continuous filament towsof a synthetic fiber similar to that employed in Example II were oriented by being stretched in three successive stages through three successive steam tubes arranged in a consecutive manner similar to that described for the apparatus schematically depicted in Figure 6 of the drawing. Each of the steam tubes was provided at both ends with sealing orifices similar to that described in connection with Figure 1-5. There were eight consecutive chambers in each of the sealing orifices. High pressure steam under constant pressures which were varied for each of the fibers being treated from between about 30 to 35 p. s. i. g. was supplied to the third steam tube. An intermediate chamber in each of the sealing orifices on the third steam tube was vented directly to the second steam tube, which formed a consecutive pair with the third tube, to provide the second tube with medium pressure steam under constant pressures which were varied from between about 22 to 33 p. s. i. g. The pressure to the second tube could be altered by changing the distance of the particular chambers being vented in the sealing orifices on the third steam tube from the ends of the tube. Likewise, an intermediate chamber in each of the sealing orifices on the second steam tube was vented directly to the consecutively paired first steam tube to provide it with low pressure steam which was varied in pressure from between about 2.5 to 7.5 p. s. i. g. The pressures and temperatures in each of the consecutively arranged steam tubes remained essentially constant throughout the stretching operations. The fiber tows were stretched between about 1.8 and 2.5 times in the presence of the constant low pressure steam in the first steam tube; between about 1.8 and 2.2 times in the presence of the constant medium pressure steam in the second tube; and between about 1.6 and 2.1 times in the presence of the constant high pressure steam in the third tube. The physical properties of the oriented fibers Were consistently uniform. Steam consumption in the operation was extremely low.

Since certain changes and modifications can be readily entered into in the practice of the present invention without substantially departing from its intended spirit and scope, it is to be fully understood that all of the foregoing description and specification be interpreted as being merely illustrative of certain of the embodiments of the invention and in no sense limiting thereof excepting as it is set forth and defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Sealing orifice for steam tubes and the like comprising a hollow, open-ended body; a pair of blocks having adjacent, matching sides, said blocks being positioned in a spaced, parallel, jaw-like relationship within said body; the matching sides of each of said blocks having a plurality of indentations therein, separated by a plurality of projecting partitions which extend equally at correspondingly spaced intervals from said maching sides of each of said blocks; an aligned plurality of apertures in said body, each of said apertures being formed between an opposing, juxtaposed pair of said partitions extending fro-m the sides of said blocks; a plurality of chambers formed by the opposed, matching indentations a on the sides of said blocks, each of said chambers being positioned between consecutive pairs of partitions; an internal passageway in said body through said chambers and between said aligned apertures; at least one outlet for fluid in one of said blocks communicating individually to the outside of said body with at least one of said chambers; means for altering the relative adjacent positioning of said blocks in said body to vary the size of the apertures formed between said partitions extending from said blocks; and coupling means on one end of said body for fastening it to the extremity of a steam tube.

2. Sealing orifice for steam tubes and the like comprising a base plate having a cover to form a hollow, open-ended enclosure; a pair of blocks having adjacent, matching sides, said blocks being positioned movable relative to one another in a spaced, parallel, jaw-like relationship on said base plate within the said enclosure; the matching sides of each of said blocks having a plurality of indentations therein, separated by a plurality of projecting partitions which extend equally at correspondingly spaced intervals from said matching sides on each of said blocks; an aligned plurality of apertures between said blocks in said enclosure, each of said apertures being formed between an opposing, juxtaposed pair of said partitions extending from the sides of said blocks; a plurality of chambers formed by the opposed, matching indentations on the sides of said blocks, each of said chambers being positioned between consecutive pairs of partitions extending from said blocks and being bounded by a pair of said apertures formed between said partitions; an internal passageway in said enclosure through said chambers and between said aligned apertures; at least one outlet for fluid in one of said blocks communicating individually to the outside of said enclosure with at least one of said chambers; means for moving one of said blocks relative to the other in said enclosure to vary the size of the apertures formed between said partitions extending from said blocks; and coupling means on one end of said enclosure for fastening it to the extremity of a steam tube.

3. The sealing orifice of claim 2 wherein there are provided a plurality of outlets for fluid in one of said blocks communicating individually to the outside of said enclosure with a like plurality of said chambers.

4. The sealing orifice of claim 2 wherein the plurality of chambers is eight.

5. Sealing orifice for steam tubes and the like comprising a base plate having a cover to form a hollow, open-ended enclosure; a pair of blocks having adjacent, matching sides, one of said blocks bein positioned movable relative to the other block in spaced, parallel, jawlike relationship on said base plate within said enclosure; the matching sides of each of said blocks having a pinrality of indentations therein, separated by a plurality of projecting partitions which extend equally at correspondingly spaced intervals from said matching sides on each of said blocks; an aligned plurality of apertures between said blocks in said enclosure, each of said apertures being formed between an opposing, juxtaposed pair of said partitions extending from the sides of said blocks; a plurality of chambers formed by the opposed, matching indentations on the sides of said blocks, each of said chambers being positioned between consecutive pairs of partitions extending from said blocks and being bounded by a pair of. said apertures formed between said partitions; an internal passageway in said enclosure through said chambers and between said aligned apertures; at least one outlet for fluid in one of said blocks communicating individually to the outside of said enclosure with at least one of said chambers; a slot-1ike striker opening in said movably positioned block; a cam member, mounted rotatabiy on said base plate, positioned in said striker opening in said movably positioned block; said cam member, when rotated, being adapted to move said movable block as by engaging against it in said striker opening to vary the size of the apertures formed between said partitions extending from said blocks; means for rotating said cam member; and coupling means on one end of said enclosure for fastening it to the extremity of a steam tube.

6. The sealing orifice of claim 5 wherein the cam member comprises a cylindrical body mounted eccentrically rotatably about a pivot on said base plate.

7. Apparatus comprising a plurality of at least two steam tubes for subjecting a running length of strandular material to a gaseous treating fluid which is maintained under pressure within said tubes; at least one extremity of each steam tube being provided with a sealing orifice which comprises a hollow, open-ended body having spaced partition elements therein forming a plurality of aligned apertures positioned at spaced intervals within said body and a plurality of consecutive chambers within said body, each of said chambers being formed between spaced partitions and communicating between each consecutive pair of said apertures, and an internal passageway in said body through said chambers and between said aligned apertures with an outlet for fluid in said body communicating with one of said chambers and having means for varying the size of the apertures in said body; means for introducing a gaseous fluid under pressure into one of said steam tubes; and means connecting at least one of the remaining steam tubes with the outlet for fluid in the sealing orifice on the steam tube in which the gaseous fluid is introduced.

8. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein both extremities of each steam tube are provided with one of said sealing orifices.

9. Apparatus comprising a plurality of at least two consecutively arranged steam tubes for subjecting a running length of strandular fluid which is maintained under pressure within said tubes; both extremities of each steam tube being provided With a sealing orifice, which comprises a hollow, open-ended body having spaced partition elements therein forming a plurality of aligned apertures positioned at spaced intervals within said body and a plurality of consecutive chambers within said body, each of said chambers being formed between spaced partitions and communicating between each consecutive pair of said apertures and an internal passageway in said body through said chambers and between said aligned apertures with an outlet for fluid in said body communicating with one of said chambers and having means for varying the size of the apertures in said body; means for introducing a gaseous fluid under pressure into one of said earn tubes; and means between each consecutive pair of steam tubes connecting the second steam tube in each consecutive pair of steam tubes with the outlets for fluid in the sealing orifices on the first steam tube in said consecutive pair.

10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein there are a plurality of at least three consecutively arranged steam tubes and wherein the means for introducing a gaseous fluid under pressure is on the last consecutively arranged steam tube and the means connecting each consecutive pair of steam tubes connects a preceding steam tube in the consecutive arrangement with the outlets for fluid in the sealing orifices on a succeeding steam tube.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein there are three consecutively arranged steam tubes.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 890,252 Thompson June 9, 1908 1,487,362 Rice Mar. 18, 1924 2,228,272 Kinsella Jan. 14, 1941 2,299,145 Hill et a1. Oct. 20, 1942 2,317,448 Dreyfus et al Apr. 27, 1943 2,509,279 Sisson May 30, 1950'

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US890252 *Jan 22, 1908Jun 9, 1908Hugh L ThompsonAnnealing-furnace.
US1487362 *Mar 15, 1922Mar 18, 1924Otis D RiceDrying apparatus
US2228272 *Feb 2, 1939Jan 14, 1941Celanese CorpTreatment of filaments or threads
US2299145 *Jun 26, 1940Oct 20, 1942Celanese CorpTreatment of textile materials
US2317448 *Dec 31, 1938Apr 27, 1943Celanese CorpApparatus for treatment of artificial materials
US2509279 *Dec 22, 1944May 30, 1950American Viscose CorpProcess and apparatus for treatment of filamentary materials
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3032890 *Mar 28, 1958May 8, 1962Continental Can CoSealing structures for treating chambers
US3778909 *Apr 21, 1972Dec 18, 1973Akzona IncApparatus for the continuous heat treatment of runing yarns
US3931684 *Oct 7, 1974Jan 13, 1976J. J. Baker Company LimitedVapor chamber for drying
US4112713 *Apr 18, 1977Sep 12, 1978Sando Iron Works Co., Ltd.Selvage curling prevention apparatus for a knitted cloth
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/242, 8/DIG.100, 8/130.1, 68/5.00E, 34/628
International ClassificationF26B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF26B13/001, Y10S8/10
European ClassificationF26B13/00D