Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2865421 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1958
Filing dateAug 14, 1956
Priority dateAug 14, 1956
Publication numberUS 2865421 A, US 2865421A, US-A-2865421, US2865421 A, US2865421A
InventorsWalsh Helen
Original AssigneeWalsh Helen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dielectric telescoping bucket
US 2865421 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1958 H. WALSH- DIELECTRIC TELESCOPING BUCKET Filed Aug. 14, 1956 INVENTOR. /1/ EL f /V Mu 5H BY ATTQFJVEY United States Patent Office 2,865,421 retreated Dec. 23, 1958 My invention relates generally to buckets, and speciiical ly to buckets used for transporting tools and equipment which buckets are formed of non-conducting material, and are capable of being telescoped into a small;r size for convenience in storage.

It is among the objects of my invention to provide a.

bucket which is safe to use to transport tools andy ma terials in the vicinity of high-tension electric lines.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a. bucket which may be collapsed for the purpose Ofcom-- serving storage space when the bucket is not in. use.

Yet a further object of my invention is to provide: a capacious bucket for the transportation of tools and equipment.

Among the further objects of my invention is to pro-- vide a bucket which is durable, compact, lightweight,A strong and relatively inexpensive.

These objects and advantages, as well as other objects. and advantages may be achieved by the device illustrated in the drawings in which:

Figure l is a partially-sectioned, side-elevational view of a dielectric telescoping bucket illustrative of my invention;

Figure 2 is a partially-sectioned, side-elevationalf view of such a bucket distended;

Figure 3 is a partial, vertical-sectional view thereof; and

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the bottom of the bucket disassociated from the other parts.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, a bucket made in accordance with my invention is provided with an annular top frame. This frame is composed of nonconducting material, such as tibreboard. This frame 11 has a top enlargement 12 which defines the upper limit of the overlap of a web with the frame. It is preferred that the frame be annular, although it may be square or in some other shape. The frame is provided with a downwardly extending portion 13. A web 14 which is tubular in form and closely conforms to the outer diameter of the frame 11 surrounds the portion 13. In order to provide for great strength of attachment, the top edge of the web is folded over so that there is an underlying overlapping portion 15. The upper portion of the web 14 and the overlapping portion 15 are secured to the frame 11 by rows of stitches 16. While the web has. been referred to as tubular, it may be formed of a sheet of material the edges of which have been secured together by stitching. It should be formed of a nonconducting material, and is preferably made of heavy canvas. A relatively coarse material such as heavy canvas is rather stiff and has a high co-efficient of friction. This is advantageous in that when the bucket is collapsed, as shown in Figure 1, the webbing where it is attached to the frame is folded upwardly inside the frame and is engaged with the external surface of the bottom. By' reason of the close t of the bottom 17 with the fran-re- 11, the web 14 at the point of attachment to the bottom will frictionally engage the web 14 at the point for storing, shipping, or carrying purposes.

where it folds upwardly inside the frame 11 (see Fig. l).-

At the bottom of the web, a bottom 17 is attached to the web. This bottom is attached to the web 14 by having the web disposed against the inner side wall of the bottom 17 with the lower edge 18 of the web folded upwardly to form an overlap 19 for additional strength. This web is secured to the bottom by two rows of stitching 20. The lower edge 18 need extend only to the floor 21 of the bottom 17. lt is preferred that the bottom 17 be formed of a single piece of leather molded to have a floor 21 with upstanding, slightly diverging flanges 22 to which the web 14 is secured. While leather is indicated as the preferred material, many other materials, such as breboard, plastics or other relatively rigid fabrics could be used.

In the interest of having the bottom 17 telescoped within the frame 11, it is essential that the external diameter of the slightly-deformable bottom 17, be substantial that of the internal diameter of the frame 11 with one layer the web lying between them as shown in Figure 1. Thus, when the bucket is telescoped, the bottom 17 will form a receptacle for the folds of the web 14, which will substantially lie in the bottom and will push up one layer of the web, so that it intrudes between the bottom 17 and the frame 11 and by reason of the proximity of the said members and the web 14, they will be maintained in frictional engagement with each other and the bucket will remain telescoped during its period yof non-use without any substantial tendency to unfold. 'Through the top of the frame 11, immediately below the enlargement 12, a pair of diametrically opposed holes 23 are provided for the insertion of a handle 24. This handle 24, like the other elements of the bucket, is formed lof a dielectric material such as manila rope with the end portion properly interwoven and spliced to the main portion.

This construction provides a bucket that is compact When the bucket is expanded from its telescoped condition, it is ycompletely safe for transporting tools, supplies and equip- Vment from the ground to the top of poles, towers and other :structures from which are suspended high-tension lines. 'To use a conducting bucket of metal under such circum- :stances is extremely hazardous and my bucket is complete- @ly safe for such usage.

The foregoing description is merely intended to illustirate an embodiment of the invention. The component parts have been shown and described. They each may have substitutes which may perform a substantially similar function; such substitutes may be known as proper substitutes for the said components and may have actually been known or invented before the present invention; these substitutes are contemplated as being within the scope of the appended claims, although they are not specifically catalogued herein.

I claim:

1. A dielectric carrier comprising an annular dielectric engaged between the top frame and the bottom when the bottom is 'nested within the top frame.

2. A dielectric carrier comprising a dielectric top frame, a deformable dielectric bottom with external dimensions substantially the same as the internal dimen- .sions of the top frame, a dielectric web attached at the :top to the outside of the frame, and at the lower edge to `tltlejnsile of thebottom, a dielectric handleV attached' to the top frame, and the web frictionally engaged between the top frame and the bottom when the bottom is nested within the top frame.

3. A dielectric carrier comprising an annular dielectricl top.frame, a ldeformable rrounddielectric bottom with external dimensions substantiallyv the same vas the internal dimensions` of the `top frame, an upwardly extendingY wall-on Ythe bottom, a dielectric liexible web stitched to Vthe outside of the'topl frame and to the inside of the upwardly extending wall, and the web rictionally engaged between the top frame andthe bottom when the bottom is nested within the top frame,

4. A dielectric carrier-comprising Ya dielectric top` frame, a 4deformable dielectricr bottom. with external dimensions substantially the sameV as the internal dimensionsof the top frame, a dielectridweb attached to the top frame and the bottom, said bottom ynestable within the top frame, and the web frictionally engaged between the top frame and the bottom when the bottomis nested within the top frame.

5. A dielectric carrier comprising an annular dielectric top vframe, a deformable round dielectric bottom with external dimensions substantially the same as the internal dimensions of the top` frame, an upwardly extending wall on the bottom, a dielectric flexible web stitched to the outside of the top frame and to the inside of the upwardly extending wall, said bottom nestable within` the said top frame, and the web frictionally engaged betweenthe top frame and the bottom when the bottom is nested within the top frame.

6. A' dielectric carrier comprising atop-frame,A a deformable bottom with external dimensions subs-tantiallyf the same as the internal dimensions of the top frame, a flexible web connecting the top frame and the bottom said top frame web and bottom telescopable'with the bottom nestable within the top frame, and the web frictionally engaged between the top frame and the bottom when the carrier is telescoped.

7. A dielectric carrier, comprising a dielectric top frame, a deformable dielectric bottom with external dimensions substantially theA sameas the internalV dimensions of the top frame, a exible dielectric web connecting the top frame and the bottom, the web being connected to the outside of the top frame and theinside of the bottom, said top frame, web, and bottom, telescopable with the bottom nestable within thetop frame, and the web frictionally engaged between the top frame and the bottom when the carrier is telescoped, and said frictional engagement of the web with the top frame and the bottom maintaining the positional engagement of the top, bottom, and

706,426 Langston Aug. 5, ,1902,

l 1,123,700 Czelnsniak Jan. 5, 1915 1,243,381 Bokop Oct. 16, 1917 1,374,960 Shipman Apr. 19, 1921 1,621,107 Cross Mar. 15, 1927 2,607,382 LeVine Aug. 19, 1952 2,664,131 Miller Dec. 29, 1953 2,711,201 Holtze June 21j,Y `1,955 j

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US706426 *Mar 24, 1902Aug 5, 1902Thomas Judson LangstonFolding basket.
US1123700 *Sep 12, 1913Jan 5, 1915Antoni C CzelnsniakCollapsible basket.
US1243381 *Feb 5, 1917Oct 16, 1917Henry D BokopFolding bucket.
US1374960 *Apr 17, 1920Apr 19, 1921Ind Products CompanyCollapsible tool-bag for linemen
US1621107 *Nov 19, 1925Mar 15, 1927Cross Alexander DGolf bag
US2607382 *Dec 29, 1948Aug 19, 1952Clubboy IncGolf bag divider
US2664131 *Dec 7, 1951Dec 29, 1953Benjamin G MillerCollapsible bucket
US2711201 *Mar 16, 1953Jun 21, 1955Bent HotzeCarrying structure for golf bag
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3058507 *Sep 8, 1960Oct 16, 1962Ind Products CompanyLinemen's tool bucket
US3746066 *Jun 18, 1971Jul 17, 1973Mc Intyre MPop-up pocket carrying bag
US4290466 *Nov 15, 1979Sep 22, 1981Oscar VillaConvertible container-holder that becomes the neck of a folding receptacle
US4960399 *Jul 14, 1988Oct 2, 1990Lyon Richard ADiver's utility console
US5676295 *May 31, 1995Oct 14, 1997Jansport Apparel CorporationMolded rubber base for luggage
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/12, 174/5.00R, 220/904, 220/665, 383/29, 383/26, 383/33
International ClassificationA45C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C7/0077, Y10S220/904
European ClassificationA45C7/00D3