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Publication numberUS2865534 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1958
Filing dateDec 17, 1956
Priority dateDec 17, 1956
Publication numberUS 2865534 A, US 2865534A, US-A-2865534, US2865534 A, US2865534A
InventorsBarnes William M
Original AssigneeCoca Cola Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device to maintain a constant liquid level in a container
US 2865534 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1958 w. M. BARNES 2,865,534

DEVICE TO MAINTAIN A CONSTANT LIQUID LEVEL IN A CONTAINER Filed Dec. 17, 1956 v 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I INVENTOR T :7, //Z //l/V MR M6,

1 BY WM? ATTORNEY DEVICE TO MAINTAIN A CONSTANT LIQUID LEVEL IN A CONTAINER Dec. 23, 1958 w. M. BARNES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec.

24 INVENTOR iV/[Z/A/V M E l/@756 ATTORNEY United Sttes ate I DEVICE T MAINTAIN A CONSTANT LIQUID LEVEL IN A CONTAINER William M. Barnes, Atlanta, Ga, assignor to The Coca- Cola Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application December 17, 1956, Serial No. 628,773

4 Claims. (Cl. 222-66) This invention relates to the dispensing of fluids, and is primarily concerned with the handling of syrup of the type used in the preparation of soft drinks, a stated quantity of syrup having added to it a pre-determined amount of carbonated water and upon proper refrigeration a palatable drink being thereby obtained.

Heretofore, devices of this general type have consisted essentially of a tank, associated with which is a draft arm for the drawing of fluid therefrom. These devices are generally satisfactory, but tend to run out of syrup, particularly at busy times at the soda fountain or other location where they are operating, which in turn causes the attendant to lose time and perhaps even customers in refilling the tank before operations can resume.

An object of the present invention is to provide a dispenser which will automatically refill itself, and accordingly always be ready for use.

Another object is to provide means for shutting off the gas in such a device, if and when the supplementary fluid supply tank becomes empty.

Another object is to provide simplicity of operation in such a device.

Another object is to provide a minimum of moving parts therein.

A still further object is to provide a dispenser that is easily cleaned.

Another object is to make possible economy of manufacture of such an instrumentality.

Another object is to provide minimum operating costs in a fountain dispenser.

These and other objects are attained by means of the instant invention, a full and complete understanding of which is facilitated by reference to the drawings herein in which:

Fig. 1 is an assembly view, partially in vertical crosssection, illustrating the instant device;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical cross-section primarily illustrating the second or gas control float of the instant dispenser; v

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2, fragmentary in part, and illustrating the operation of both the syrup control float and gas cut-off arrangement; and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view in horizontal cross-section, fragmentary in part and taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 2, illustrating the regulatory means for the two floats involved herein.

Referring now to the drawings (Fig. 1), it will be seen that the instant dispenser includes a gravity primary dispensing tank having a top or cap 11 secured thereon as by means of wing nut 12 and cooperating bolt 13, top 11 being pivoted as at 14 to provide ready access to the interior of the tank. A draft arm 15 is associated with the bottom of tank 10 in a conventional manner, and so operates that when the handle member 16 thereof is actuated, syrup or a like fluid is allowed to flow through nozzle 17. A carbon dioxide gas cylinder 18 is positioned at a point remote to the dispenser per se, said tank being provided with suitable gauges 19, and a line 20 which is operably connected with a pressurized storage vessel 21 m which a supplementary supply of fluid is contained, a tube 22 entering 21 near the top thereof and extending to a point approximating the bottom of said tank in order that all available fluid may be drawn therefrom.

Special attention is now directed to the valve or float arrangement controlling the syrup supply to tank 10 (Fig. 2), this consisting essentially of a main syrup float 23, associated with an actuating arm 24 pivoted as at 25, and carrying a valve 26, which seats at a point 27 in the bottom of a supplementary control element 28 having a cap 29 -and a smaller cap 30 which may be removed for the purpose of priming.

A float 31 freely operates Within 28, said float having a valve element 32 which is calculated to seat at 33.

From the foregoing, the operation of subject dispenser should be obvious, it being apparent that when there is the desired amount of fluid in tank 10, float 23 will assume a position approximating that shown in Fig. 2 at which time the device is to all intents and purposes static, but when the syrup supply falls below a given level, float 23 will likewise move downwardly as suggested by Fig. 3 of the drawings, and permit syrup to enter through valve 2627 until such time as arm 24 is again restored to a more or less horizontal position, at which time the supply will be cut off until there is need for replenishment.

As long as there is liquid in the inner chamber of element 28, float 31 will be buoyant and permit fluid to freely flow from storage tank 21 therethrough to the valve seat at point 27, as suggested by Figure 2, but When the liquid level inside the chamber falls below a given point, as suggested by said Fig. 3, float 31 will automatically close valve 3233, and thereby prevent any of the counter pressure carbon dioxide in the system from escaping. This prevents waste of gas and other undesirable consequences.

From the foregoing, it is apparent there has been shown and described a dispenser which is automatic in its operation insofar as maintaining a desired amount of syrup therein is concerned. That same is economical, simple, has few moving parts, is easy to clean, prevents waste of gas, and is otherwise fully adapted for its intended purposes.

While there has been described in some detail one form of the instant invention, it is apparent that no limitation is implied thereby, but on the contrary, the appended claims are to be given an interpretation and scope fully in keeping with the contribution to the art.

I claim:

1. In a device of the character described, in combination, a pressurized tank for containing a reserve supply of liquid, a source of gas under pressure communicating with the top of said tank, a liquid conduit extending into the bottom thereof, a primary tank for containing a primary supply of said liquid and having a valved outlet, and liquid inflow control means in said primary tank, said control means comprising a chamber having an inlet port communicating with said conduit and an outlet passage opening into said primary tank, float operated valve means for closing said outlet passage when an adequate supply of liquid is present in said primary tank, and float operated means within said chamber for closing said outlet passage when said chamber is empty of liquid, to prevent flow of gas therethrough.

2. In a device of the character described, in combina tion, a pressurized tank for containing a reserve supply of liquid, a source of gas under pressure communicating with the top of said tank, a liquid conduit extending into let port communicating with said conduit and an outlet passage opening into said primary tank, automatic means for closing said outlet passage when an adequate supply of liquid is present in said primary tank, and float operated means Within said chamber for closing said outlet passage when said chamber is empty of liquid, to prevent flow of gas therethrough.

3. In a device of the character described, in combination, a pressurized tank for containing a reserve supply of liquid, a source ofgas under pressure communicating with the top of said tank, a liquid conduit extending into the bottom thereof, a primary tank for containing a primary supply of said liquid and having a valved outlet, and liquid inflow control means in said primary tank, said control means comprising a chamber having an inlet port communicating with said conduit and an outlet passage tion, a pressurized tank for containing a reserve supply of liquid, at source of gas under pressure communicating with the top of said tank, a liquid conduit extending into the bottom thereof, a primary tank for containing a primary supply of said liquid and having a valved outlet, and liquid inflow control means in said primary tank, said control means comprising a chamber having an inlet port communicating with said conduit and an outlet passage opening into said primary tank, automatic means for closing said outlet passage when an adequate supply of liquid is present in said primary tank, and automatic means within said chamber for closing said outlet passage when said chamber is empty of liquid, to prevent fiow of gas therethrough.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,675,270 Hurst June 26, 1928 2,160,501 Hedges May 30, 1939 2,339,082 Krorner Jan. 11, 1944 2,383,507 Martin Aug, 28, 1945 2,630,249 Bryant et a1 .4. Mar. 3, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 202,749 Australia Aug. 6, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1675270 *Jul 25, 1922Jun 26, 1928James HurstControl device
US2160501 *Apr 1, 1936May 30, 1939Edward G HedgesMethod of filling liquid dispensing systems
US2339082 *Nov 18, 1939Jan 11, 1944Kromer Wallace RBeverage handling and dispensing apparatus
US2383507 *Dec 2, 1941Aug 28, 1945American Can CoContainer filling system
US2630249 *Aug 9, 1948Mar 3, 1953Brown Edward ALiquid fertilizer feeder for irrigation systems
AU202749B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3707160 *Feb 1, 1971Dec 26, 1972Query Grady WRemote storage arrangement for dishwashing treating agent
US3931818 *Jul 22, 1974Jan 13, 1976Michael GoldowskyLiquid administration apparatus
US4340050 *Dec 29, 1980Jul 20, 1982Delmed Inc.Medical fluid flow rate indicating/controlling device
US4375813 *Feb 10, 1981Mar 8, 1983Delmed, Inc.Medical fluid flow rate controlling device
US5915408 *Jun 7, 1996Jun 29, 1999Vortox CompanyFloat valve assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/66, 137/393, 222/68, 137/433, 222/399
International ClassificationG05D9/02, G05D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG05D9/02
European ClassificationG05D9/02