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Publication numberUS2865674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1958
Filing dateOct 21, 1957
Priority dateOct 21, 1957
Publication numberUS 2865674 A, US 2865674A, US-A-2865674, US2865674 A, US2865674A
InventorsJelmeland Mark C
Original AssigneeJelmeland Mark C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination sprinkling and fire extinguishing apparatus, and guttering
US 2865674 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 23, 1958 M. c. JELMELAND 2,865,674

COMBINATION SPRINKLING AND FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS, AND GUTTERING Filed Oct. 21, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1958 M. C..JELMELAND 2,865,674

COMBINATION SPRINKLING AND FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS, AND GUTTERING Filed Oct. 21, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Mfm J42 A TTOENEY COMBINATION SPRINKLING AND FIRE EXTIN- GUISHING APPARATUS, AND GUTTERING Mark C. Jelmeland, Burbank, Calif. Application October 21, 1957, Serial No. 691,250 Claims. (Cl. 299-404) The present invention relates generallyto the building art, and more particularly to a novel combination sprinkling and fire extinguishing apparatus, and guttering for use with residences, public buildings and other types of structures.

It is well known in the art to mount water pipes above the roof of a building in order to direct streams of water onto the roof in order to cool the building and/or extinguish a fire. However, in all of the known constructions, the water flows into the guttering and down a drain pipe to the ground, or else it flows down the outer walls of the building to the ground.

It is an object of the present invention, therefore, to

I provide a novel combination sprinkling and fire extinguishv and guttering in which the water which ing apparatus, flows from the roof, is re-circulated. More particularly, it is an object to provide such an apparatus which includes means for receiving the water from the roof and re-circulating it through the springler system whereby only a small amount of make-up water 1s required.

Another object is to provide a novel combination sprinkling and fire extinguishing apparatus, and guttering for directing water upon the roof of the building and for also sprinkling the ground areas contiguous with the buildings. More particularly it is an object to provide an apparatus of the described type which includes two sets of sprinkler heads and means for selectively directing the water through either set of heads.

Another object is to provide a novel combination sprinkling and fire extinguishing apparatus, and guttering in which the water conduits are formed integral with the eavestrough of the guttering.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent from the detailed description which follows, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein preferred embodiments of the invention are shown.

Briefly, the invention comprises an eavestrough for attachment to a building adjacent the edge of the roof and which contains two water conduits. One set of sprinkler heads is provided in communication with one conduit in position to direct water onto the roof, and a second set of sprinkler heads is provided in communication with the other conduit in position to direct water onto the ground areas adjacent the building for irrigation purposes. A downspout which is connected with the eavestrough functions as a reservoir to collect the water which'runs off of the roof, and means are provided for recirculating the collected water through the roof sprinklers.

In the drawings;

Fig. 1 is a somewhat schematic perspective view of a building provided with a combination sprinkling and fire extinguishing apparatus embodying the teachings of the present invention,

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical transverse sectional view taken on the line 22 in Fig. 1,

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 2, showing a modified construction,

Fig. 5 is a somewhat schematic view of one form of control, and

Fig. 6 is a somewhat schematic view of a modified form of control.

Referring to the drawings more particularly by reference numbers, 10 indicates generally a building on which is mounted a combination sprinkling and fire extinguishing apparatus 12 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.

The apparatus 12 includes a longitudinally extending gutter member 14 which is preferably extruded from plastic material or aluminum, and which contains an eavestrough portion 16 of generally U-shaped cross section. Although the eavestrough 16 is shown in the drawings as the box style of guttering, it will be understood that the half round form could also be employed.

In the preferred construction, a conduit housing 18 which contains conduits 20 and 22, is formed integral with the eavestrough at the upper extremity of one leg. As will be described in more detail hereinafter, the conduit housing can be separate and apart from the eavestrough 16 and aflixed to one of the, legs by conventional fastening means, or, as shown in Fig. 4, the conduits can be positioned in the bottom of the eavestrough.

Sprinkler heads 24 and 26 are mounted on the conduit housing at spaced intervals in communication with the conduits 20 and 22, respectively. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the sprinkler heads 24 are directed inwardly to spray the roof area, and the sprinkler heads 26 are directed outwardly to spray the ground area adjacent the building.

side of Fig. 2,

Although the method of mounting the gutter member 14 on the building is not shown, it is readily apparent that conventional means may be employed, e. g. strap hangers or spikes and ferrules.

The downspout 28 is connected into the gutter member 14 for receiving the water which flows off of the roof and into the gutter member 14. The downspout 28 differs from conventional downspouts in that it contains a valve 30 adjacent the lower end thereof which is responsive to the level of the water in the downspout so as to maintain a predetermined head of water therein, whereby the latter functions as a reservoir or sump as will be more fully explained hereinafter. The valve 30 can be made responsive to fluid pressure but it is preferable to employ a float switch 31 for controlling the height of the water in the downspout 28.

Pipes or tubes 32 and 34 are connected into the conduits 20 and 22, respectively, and are mounted on the downspout 28 so as to extend from the gutter member 14, down to adjacent the ground level. As will be readily apparent, the pipe 32 is used for conveying water to the roof sprinklers 24, and the pipe 34 is used for conveying I the pipes and 122, respectively, by conventional fittings, and extend over the outer edge of the gutter and down the outside of the downspout 28.

Turning next to a consideration 'of the construction for introducing water into the pipes leading to the sprinklers, a pipe 36 with a control valve 38 at the upper end thereof, is connected to a source'of water under pressure. A short nipple 40 connects the valve 38 with a two position valve 42.

In the-construction shown in Fig. .5, one outlet of the valve 42 is connected directly to the pipe 34 and the other outlet is connected to the pipe 32 through a pipe 43 and a Venturi-like fitting 143 so as to produce a vacuum below the fitting 143-. The lower end of the pipe 32 is connected into the downspout 28 through a one way valve 44 which permits water to flow from the downspout 28 into the pipe 32, but prevents flow in the reverse direction.

To use the control shown in Fig. 5 for sprinkling the ground areas, the valve 42 is turned so as to connect the pipe 40 with the pipe 34. Then, when the valve 38 is opened, water under pressure flows from pipe 3-6, through pipe 40 and pipe 34 into the conduit 22, and thence into the sprinkler heads 26.

To use the apparatus (Fig. 5) for sprinkling the roof in order to extinguish a fire or for cooling purposes, the valve 42 is turned to connect the pipe 46 with the pipe 43. Thus, when the valve 33 is opened, water under pressure flows into the pipe 43 and upwardly in pipe 32, through conduit 29 and into the sprinkler heads 24. The upward movement of the water through the fitting 143 causes a vacuum above the valve 44, whereby the water in the downspout 28 flows into the pipe 32 and is carried upwardly by the stream of water from the pipe 43.

Obviously, the water from the sprinklers 24 flows ofi of the roof, into the gutter 14, and down the downspout 28 so as to be available for re-circulation through the apparatus.

If the loss of water in sprinkling the roof area is not vary great, as for example may occur when the roof sprinklers are used for cooling on a relatively cool day, the amount of make-up water to be supplied from the pipe 36 may be insufiicient to force the water up to the roof. In such instances, it would be necessary to use the controls shown in Fig. 6 wherein an electrically driven pump 46 is connected in the pipe 32 above the pipe 43 and the one-way valve 44.

As mentioned hereinabove, the valve: 30 at the lower end of the downspout 28 prevents the water from draining from the downspout 28 under normal operating conditions of the roof sprinklers. However, during a rain or when too much water is entering the system from the pipe 36 so as to raise the water level in the downspout above the preselected point, the valve 30 is automatically opened by the float control 31 so as to reduce the level of the water in the downspout.

If desired, the operation of the valve 33 can be made responsive to the operation of the valve 30 in the installation in Fig. 6, whereby the valve 38 will be closed when the water level in the downspout 28 is too high so as to cause the valve St) to open. However, in most installations the amount of make-up water which is required can be determined by trial and error and the handle of valve 38 adjusted accordingly.

Thus, it is apparent that there has been provided a novel combination sprinkling and fire extinguishing apparatus which fulfills all of the objects and advantages sought therefor.

The device can be used for sprinkling ground areas adjacent the building or for directing water onto the roof of the building to extinguish a fire or to cool the building a by evaporation.

The water from the roof is automatically recirculated and it is only necessary'to add sufiicient water to replace the relatively small amount which is lost by evaporation, and this can be accomplished automatically if desired.

The conduits for the sprinkler heads can be formed in? tegral with the eavestrough for new installations, and in existing installations, the conduits can be fastened to the wall of the eavestrough or positioned in the bottom thereof..

It is to be understood that the foregoing description and accompanying drawings have been given only by way of illustration and example, and that changes and alterations in the present disclosure, which will be readily apparent to one skilled in the art, are contemplated as within the scope of the present invention which is limited only by the claims which follow.

What is claimed is:

1. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; two water conduits supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one sprinkler head in communication with one of said conduits and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; at least one sprinkler head in communication with the other conduit and positioned to spray water on the ground area adjacent the building; and means for selectively introducing water under pressure into said conduits.

2. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof, said eavestrough having an outer wall; a housing containing two water conduits formed integral with said outer wall and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one sprinkler head mounted on the housing in communication with one conduit and positioned to spray water on the, roof area; at least onesprinkler head mounted on the housing in communication with the other conduit and positioned to spray water on the ground area; and means for selectively introducing water under pressure into said conduits.

3. A sprinkling apparatus for use with'a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough of general U-shaped cross section for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; two water pipes positioned in the bottom of the eavestrough so as to extend longitudinally thereof; at least one sprinkler head in communication with one of said pipes and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; at least one sprinkler head in communication with the other pipe and positioned to spray water on the ground area; and means for selectively introducing water under pressure into said pipes.

4. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; two water conduits supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one springler head in communication with one of said conduits and positioned to spray water on the room area of the building; at least one sprinkler head in communication With the other conduit and positioned to spray water on the ground area adjacent the building; a downspout connected to the eavestrough and depending therefrom; a valve adjacent the lower end of the downspout for controlling the flow of water therefrom; a first pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the ground sprinkler; a second pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the roof sprinkler, the other end of said second pipe being in communication with the interior of the downspout adjacent the lower end thereof and above the valve; means for introducing water under pressure into the first pipe; and means for introducing water under pressure into the second pipe through a Venturi-like connection to produce a vacuum in the lower part of the second pipe in communication with the interior of the downspout.

5. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; two water conduits supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof, at least one sprinkler head in communication with one of said conduits and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; at least one sprinkler head 1n communication with the other conduit and positloned to spray water on the ground area adjacent the building; a downspout connected to the eavestrough and depending therefrom; a valve adjacent the lower end of the downspout for controlling the fiow of water therefrom; a first pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the ground sprinkler; a second pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the roof sprinkler, the other end of said second pipe being in communication with the interior of the downspout adjacent the lower end thereof and above the valve; a oneway valve in the lower end of the second pipe to prevent water from flowing from said second pipe into the downspout; means for introducing water under pressure into the first pipe; and means for introducing water under pressure into the second pipe through a Venturi-like connection to produce a vacuum in the lower part of the second pipe in communication with the interior of the downspout.

6. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; two water conduits supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one sprinkler head in communication with one of said conduits and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; at least one sprinkler head in communication with the other conduit and positioned to spray water on the ground area adjacent the building; a downspout connected to the eavestrough and depending therefrom; a valve adjacent the lower end of the downspout for controlling the fiow of water therefrom and responsive to the level of the water in the downspout so as to remain closed when the water level is below a preselected amount and to open when the water level rises above said preselected amount; a first pine connected to the conduit in communication with the ground sprinkler; a second pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the roof sprinkler, the lower end of said second pipe being in communication with the interior of the downspout above the valve; a oneway valve in the lower end of the second pipe to prevent water from fiowing from said second pipe into the downspout; means for introducing water under pressure into the first pipe; and means for introducing water under pressure into the second pipe through a Venturi-like connection to produce a vacuum in the lower part of the second pipe in communication with the interior of the downspout.

7. A sprinkling apparatus for use, with a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; two water conduits supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one'sprinkler head in communication with one of said conduits and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; at least one sprinkler head in communication with the other conduit and positioned to spray water on the ground area adjacent the building; a downspout connected to the eavestrough and depending therefrom; a valve adjacent the lower end of the downspout for controlling the flow of water therefrom; a first pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the ground sprinkler; a second pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the roof sprinkler, the other end of said second pipe being in communication with the interior of the downspout adjacent the lower end thereof and above the valve; means for introducing water under pressure into the first pipe; means for introducing water into the second pipe; and pump means connected to the second pipe for increasing the pressure of the water flowing to the roof sprinklers.

8. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area and a ground area adjacent thereto, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; two water conduits supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one sprinkler head in communication with one of said conduits and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; at least one sprinkler head in communication with the other conduit and positioned to spray water on the ground area adjacent the building; a downspout connected to the eavestrough and depending therefrom; a first valve adjacent the lower end of the downspout for controlling the fiow of water therefrom; a first pipe connected to the conduit in communication with the ground sprinkler; a second pipe having the upper end thereof connected to the conduit in communication with the roof sprinkler and the lower end thereof in communication with the interior of the downspout adjacent the lower end thereof and above the valve; a source of water under pressure in communication with the inlet of a second valve having two outlets and means for connecting the inlet with either one of the outlets; a connection between one outlet of the second valve and the first pipe; and a connection between the other outlet of the second valve and the second pipe.

9. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; a water conduit supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one sprinkler head in communication with said conduit and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; a downspout connected to the eavestrough and depending therefrom; a first valve adjacent the lower end of the downspout for controlling the fiow of water therefrom responsive to the level of the water in the downspout; a pipe having the upper end thereof connected to the conduit and the lower end thereof in communication with the interior of the downspout adjacent the lower end thereof and above the valve; a second valve in the lower end of the pipe to permit the flow of water from the downspout into the pipe but to prevent the reverse flow thereof; and means for introducing water under pressure into the pipe above the second valve through a Venturidike connection to produce a vacuum in the lower part of the pipe.

10. A sprinkling apparatus for use with a building having a roof area, comprising an eavestrough for attachment to the building adjacent an edge of the roof; a water conduit supported by the eavestrough and extending longitudinally thereof; at least one sprinkler head in communication with said conduit and positioned to spray water on the roof area of the building; a downspout connected to the eavestrough and depending therefrom; a first valve adjacent the lower end of the downspout for controlling the fiow of water therefrom responsive to the level of the water in the downspout, a pipe having the upper end thereof connected to the conduit and the lower end thereof in communication with the interior of the downspout adjacent the lower end thereof and above the valve; a second valve in the lower end of the pipe to permit the flow of water from the downspout into the pipe but to prevent the reverse flow thereof; means for introducing water into the pipe above the second valve; and pump means connected to the pipe for increasing the pressure of the water flowing to the sprinkler head.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 487,548 Wilbor Dec. 6, 1892 1,620,l42 Thompson Mar. 8, 1927 1,819,522 Roseuhagen Aug. 18, 1931 2,791,964 Reeve May 14, 1957 2,798,436 Teasdale July 9, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 3,606 Great Britain Dec. 30, 1812

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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/208, 239/450, 137/398, 239/332, 137/397, 239/312, 417/181, 52/16, 169/5
International ClassificationA62C35/60, A62C35/58
Cooperative ClassificationA62C35/605
European ClassificationA62C35/60B