Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2867835 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1959
Filing dateDec 28, 1956
Priority dateDec 28, 1956
Publication numberUS 2867835 A, US 2867835A, US-A-2867835, US2867835 A, US2867835A
InventorsJr Charles K Brown, Sr Charles K Brown
Original AssigneeJr Charles K Brown, Sr Charles K Brown
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double acting vacuum and scrubbing head
US 2867835 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 13, 1959 c, W RQ, ETAL 2,867,835

DOUBLE ACTING VACUUM AND SCRUBBING HEAD I Original Filed Sept. 26. 1950 INVEVTOR.

chm/.55 KEPLER snow, JR.

FIG. 3

CHARLES KEPLER BROWN, 81?.

AT ORNEY United States Patent DOUBLE ACTING VACUUM AND SCRUBBING Charles K. Brown, Jr., Verona, N. J., and Charles K.

' Brown, Sr., Fairmont, W. Va.

4 Claims. (Cl. -328) This invention relates to vacuum sweepers and systems, and more particularly to nozzles for use therewith. The purpose of this particular nozzle is to remove dirt and liquids from surfaces on which it is used for cleaning them. This application is a substitute for United States patent application Serial No. 186,872, filed September 26, 1950, by applicants, and which is now abandoned.

In a conventional form of nozzle used for cleaning a surface, provision is made for a scrubbing brush to sweep up, detach or loosen the dirt thereon, which is combined with the nozzle structure. The nozzle structure proper has the equivalent of a squeegee which collects the water and dirt as it is pushed or swept in one direction only. This limits its utility for use in one direction and increases the amount of effort required for it to clean a specified area.

In this invention, the nozzle is made double-acting so it can remove the water and dirt, whichever way the squeegee is moved over the area. Further, instead of the brush and squeegee being located next to each other, they are spaced apart and work without any interference with each other.

It is an object of this invention, therefore, to provide a new and improved vacuum nozzle having a double squeegee action which will enable the squeegee to shift from one side of the nozzle to the other while presenting a free suction duct for the collection of water and dirt at all times.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved vacuum nozzle which will permit work of removing liquid from an area to be done readily and without requiring a complicated structure.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved vacuum nozzle arrangement which is economical to manufacture, and which is efficient and reliable in operation. 8

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will become apparent as the invention is more fully described. For a better understanding of the invention and the objects thereof, reference is made to the accompanying drawing. This drawing in conjunction with the following description outline a particular form of the invention by way of example, while the claims emphasize the scope of the invention.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a double acting vacuum and scrubbing head embodying this invention;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on line 2--2 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 3 is a rear view of Fig. 1, with parts broken away to show its inner construction.

The structureindicated in Figs. 1, 2, and 3 of the drawing consists of a nozzle shell arrangement 10 provided at one end with a large, substantially rectangular base 11 which holds a brush 12, with the shell having at its opposite end a smaller rectangular open face 13 within which a rubber squeegee 14 operates. The side walls of the nozzle arrangement 10 taper from the base 11 to the face ,7 2,867,835 Patented Jan. 13, 1959 2 13, as indicated in'the drawing. A chamber 17 having the general form of the exterior of the shell forms a vacuum reservoir for the functioning of the nozzle arrangement 10. The nozzle arrangement 10 is several times longer than its width to provide ample sweeping and suction surface to the tool.

A longitudinal slit 16 of rectangular contour extends through the top Wall and serves as a limiting control to the sidewise movement and bending of a squeegee 14. It is wide enough to permit the squeegee 14 to press against one side of the slit 16 and leave ample space between it and the opposite side for the air to pass through during the vacuum functioning of the nozzle arrangement 10 to its chamber 17.

The squeegee 14 is a rubber strip held crimped in a thin frame 18 that extends longitudinally across it and stifiens its back. The frame 18, however, is extended into two lateral lugs 19, short in width and height, which are placed in grooves 20 in the interior end walls of the nozzle arrangement 10. The lugs 19 and grooves 20 keep the squeegee 14 upright in the shell and enable it to function properly.

The squeegee 14 is kept positioned in the grooves and extended slightly outside of the shell slit 16 under the resilient pressure of a pair of coil springs 21. These springs 21 fit over pins 22 projected from the back of the frame 18 and suitably spaced to give an even pressure against it.

The pins 22 hold one end of each spring 21 so they will be kept aligned in definite locations. The opposite ends of the springs 21 are kept in line by other pins 23 projected interiorly into the springs and rigidly mounted on the interior face of the brush 12.

The brush 12 is of the rubber-set type with bristles 24 extending out in a circumferential row from the base of the brush. The base of the brush 12 is of sheet metal, or the like, with a rubber guard 28 or like surrounding the base and designed in its contour to fit and press against the base 11 of the nozzle arrangement 10 and be fastened in place thereon by screws 26. The screws 26 are inserted and secured from the outside of the brush 12 and thread into holes 27 in guard 28 adjoining the shell 10 adjacent to its open base 11.

A handle 30, of hollow tubular construction, is employed to manipulate the nozzle arrangement 10. It is secured to the shell 10 by a swivel joint or elbow 29 arranged thereon. The joint 29 is of conventional form with its inner lip 31 enlarged so as to be swivelly held by an integral sleeve member 32 extended from the wall of the shell and its end swaged over to hold it in a rotatable manner.

The purpose of the swivel joint 29 is to allow the handle 30 to be rotated to the position which will allow the selective use of either the squeegee 14 or the brush 12. For instance, in the full line position of the swivel 29 shown in Fig. 2, the brush 12 can be used and not the squeegee 14 since the handle 30 would prevent use thereof. However, when the swivel joint is turned to the dotted-line position shown in Fig. 2, then the relative positions are reversed, the squeegee 14 can be used but not the brush 12.

The brush 12 covers over the shell at the base so that no leakage of air takes place therethrough. The squeegee 14 can be rubbed in either direction against the floor or surface to be cleaned and bent against one side of the slit 16, and in doing so leaves the lateral space towards the opposite side open for the flow of air sucked in with the water and dirt included. The water and dirt are drawn into the chamber 17 and pass into the vacuum system.

The device as illustrated is easily manufactured for production purposes, as its design lends itself to this pos- 'Therarrangement works efiectivelyl The arrangement, inhaving the brush 12 and the sucking slit 16 spaced apart at opposite sides of the nozzle so they will not interfere with each other, although positioned close enough to be used alternately and quickly, when required, is particularly valuable and convenient to the user thereof. Its avoidance of intricate parts simplifies its construction and reduces its cost of production, while, at the same time, the general appearance is subject to attractive contours.

While but one form of the invention is indicated in this application and shown in the drawing, it is not desired to limit it to this particular form as it is appreciated that other structures and constructions could be made that would employ the same principles and come within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A combined suction nozzle and brush, comprising, a casing open at two opposite ends, one of said ends constituting an open slit, a removable closure for the other end secured to saidcasing, means for securing bristles to e said closure projecting outwardly of said casing to form a brush, the inside of said casing constituting a vacuum chamber communicating with said slit, means for connecting said chamber to a source of vacuum, said means including a curved swivel joint having one end connected laterally to said casing, said swivel joint being connectible to a handle at its opposite end, a squeegee within said chamber, said squeegee protruding through said slit and spaced from the walls thereof, wherein said squeegee securing bristles having a common vertical axis, whereby they may be selectively used on a flat surface by swivelling of said handle about said casing. v

2. The combination set forth in claim 1, wherein said means for supporting said squeegee on said closure consist of a plurality of spaced helical springs.

3. A combined suction nozzle and brush, comprising, a casing open at at least one'end to form a slit, means for securing bristles to the other end of said casing projecting outwardly thereof to form a brush, the inside of said casing constituting a vacuum chamber communicating with said slit, means for connecting said chamber to a source of vacuum, said means including a curved .swivel joint having one end connected laterally to said casing, said swivel joint being connectible to a handle at its opposite end, a squeegee Within said chamber, said squeegee protruding through said slit and spaced from the walls thereof, whereby said squeegee may be ,flexed selectively against each of the longitudinal walls ,of said slit, and means for supporting said squeegee, said squeegee and means for securing said bristles having a common vertical axis, whereby they may be selectively used on a fiat surface by swivelling of said handle about said casing.

4. The combination set forth in claim 1, wherein said means for supporting said squeegee consists of a plurality of spaced helical springs.

References'Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 7,14,034- Richter Nov. 18, 1902 1,239,903 Fisher Sept. 4, 1917 1,762,142 Breton u June 10,1930 1,856,875 Leonard May 3, 1932 2,218,595 Yutzler Oct. 22, 1940 2,281,082 Stevens Apr. 28, 1942 2,310,554 Seyfried Feb. 9, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US714034 *Jan 5, 1901Nov 18, 1902Frederick W RichterFloor or sidewalk cleaner.
US1239903 *Jul 26, 1917Sep 11, 1917Waterbury Mfg CoFloat-wire guide.
US1762142 *Jan 14, 1927Jun 10, 1930Paul BretonVacuum cleaning machine
US1856875 *Jan 4, 1930May 3, 1932Air Way Electric Appl CorpVacuum cleaner floor tool
US2218595 *Mar 1, 1939Oct 22, 1940Kent Company IncWater pickup tool
US2281082 *May 22, 1940Apr 28, 1942Electrolux CorpSwivel connection
US2310554 *Oct 18, 1941Feb 9, 1943Scovill Manufacturing CoSuction nozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3029461 *Jun 30, 1960Apr 17, 1962Bissell IncCombination vacuum cleaner and floor scrubber
US3069716 *Feb 11, 1960Dec 25, 1962Signal Mfg CoVacuum cleaner nozzle and attachment
US3079623 *Jun 29, 1959Mar 5, 1963Whirlpool CoVacuum cleaner floor tool
US4270238 *Jul 18, 1979Jun 2, 1981Service Master Industries, Inc.Cleaning tool
US4864681 *Jun 20, 1988Sep 12, 1989Emerson Electric Co.Multi-purpose floor cleaning tool
US4893375 *Mar 17, 1989Jan 16, 1990Hako Minuteman, Inc.Dual mode floor scrubbing machine
US5280666 *Jun 25, 1992Jan 25, 1994Rexair, Inc.Squeegee apparatus for a vacuum cleaner system
US5419007 *Dec 16, 1993May 30, 1995Emerson Electric Co.for use with a vacuum cleaner
US5497530 *Jul 23, 1992Mar 12, 1996Alfred Karcher Gmbh & Co.Wiper device for hard surfaces, in particular a window wiper
US5819365 *Jul 15, 1996Oct 13, 1998Bissell Inc.Window washing accessory cleaning tool for use with water extraction cleaning machine
US5819366 *Dec 2, 1996Oct 13, 1998Aktiebolaget ElectroluxWet cleaning suction nozzle
US6572711 *Dec 1, 2000Jun 3, 2003The Hoover CompanyMulti-purpose position sensitive floor cleaning device
US7174603 *Dec 21, 2004Feb 13, 2007The Hoover CompanyMulti-purpose position sensitive floor cleaning device
US7203994 *Oct 13, 2004Apr 17, 2007Smith Donald ACompressed air vacuum cleaner
US7299522Apr 1, 2004Nov 27, 2007Smith Donald ACompressed air vacuum cleaner
US7617564Oct 5, 2005Nov 17, 2009Alto U.S. Inc.Dual purpose floor cleaning apparatus and method of use
US7661175Sep 19, 2008Feb 16, 2010Emerson Electric Co.Snap-together wet nozzle for vacuum appliance
US7805805 *Nov 13, 2006Oct 5, 2010Loveless Ash Company, Inc.Vacuum assisted scraper
US7832049Feb 16, 2010Nov 16, 2010Emerson Electric Co.Snap-together wet nozzle for vacuum appliance
EP0576174A1 *Jun 10, 1993Dec 29, 1993Rexair, IncSqueegee apparatus for a vacuum cleaner system
WO1993002611A1 *Jul 23, 1992Feb 18, 1993Kaercher Gmbh & Co AlfredDevice for cleaning hard surfaces, in particular windows
WO2006044543A2 *Oct 13, 2005Apr 27, 2006Donald A SmithCompressed air vacuum cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/328, 15/322, 15/117, 15/417, 15/400, 15/401
International ClassificationA47L9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/068, A47L9/06
European ClassificationA47L9/06, A47L9/06G