Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2869344 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1959
Filing dateMar 6, 1957
Priority dateMar 6, 1957
Publication numberUS 2869344 A, US 2869344A, US-A-2869344, US2869344 A, US2869344A
InventorsBochan John
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal clutch for clothes washing machine
US 2869344 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. zo, 1959 Filed March 6, 1957 v J. BocHAN 2,869,344

CENTRIFUGAL CLUTCH FOR CLOTHES WASHING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 l 1'" U11.' UHHHUHHHH! @wwf I E lo i 27 o o o o o o o o 0"" 0 0 u E H 9 Q\8/ 2s I 5 #sa 6 f: wa 7 I @n rm Z 6^ 6A i 34 I3 l 2o IN V EN TOR.

B* @www H ns A-rToRNE'v 4 2 4 u 6 mm HS M5 M G N I un W Nw Mm m Bw F ou Jun N G w l c m U F I m7 m 9C1 5 9 6 1 m .l 0 u 2 M 0 d m e n .J F

FIG.2

INVENTOR.

J'OHN BOC-HAN /f Wy HIS ATTORNEY Jaln. 20, 1959 J.BocHAN 2,869,344

CENTRIF'UGAL CLUTCH- FOR CLOTHES WASHING MACHINE Filed March 6, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Fles INVENTOR. .ToHN soenna ms 'A'rronNaY CENTRIFUGAL CLUTCH FOR CLOTHES WASHING MACHINE Filed March 6, 1957 J. BOCHAN Jan, 2o, 1959 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. J'OHN BGCHAN BY .f

H x s ATTcRNEv CENTRIFUGAL. CLUTCH FOR CLOTHES WASHING MACHINE Filed March 6, 1957 J. BOCHAN Jan. 20, 1959 v5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR.

BOCHAN /f, WMM

mdb-h.

A er. w NDF u J'DHN H15 ATToRNsY :3 E Se@ United States Patent CENTRIFUGAL CLUTCH FOR CLOTHES WASHING MACHINE .lohn Buchan, Louisville, Ky., assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application March 6, 1957, Serial No. 644,381

Claims. (Cl. 68--12) My invention relates to automatic clothes washing machines of the centrifugal extraction type and more particularly to the drive arrangements used in such machines.

ln a clothes washing machine it is desirable that the operator be able to control the amount of water introduced in the wash basket so that she may conserve water when only a small load of clothes is to be washed. Preferably, the water control should be such that she can set it when she loads the machine and then leave the machine without having to be present during the filling operation. It has been difficult, however, to provide a presettable control of this type in centrifugal extraction machines which use an imperforate or generally imperforate wash basket that is filled separately from the outer tub enclosing it. By utilizing an imperforate basket which is filled separately from the tub, instead of a perforated basket which communicates with the tub and which is filled by filling the tub, less water is needed for washing a given load of clothes because no water is wasted in filling the tub. But since the wash basket rotates during the extraction operations of the machine, often vibrating from its normal position, it is difiicult to provide a simple means for sensing the water level within the imperforate basket. Certain complex sensing arrangements have been provided, but they have not found general use due to their cost and other drawbacks. Rather, in a conventional way of terminating the filling operation a small amount ofA water is overtlowed into the tub to actuate a water level switch in the tub, and that switch de-energizes the water valves. With this overflow method of terminating the filling operation, about the only way that the imperforate basket can be filled with only a partial load of water is for the operator to remain at the machine during the filling operation, and then operate a suitable switch to de-energize the lvalves when the desired level is reached. This is obviously not as satisfacotry as a presettable control which would allow her to leave the machine.

it has been suggested that a simple presettable control could be; provided for imperforate basket machines by an arrangement along the following lines. In this arrangement the inlet watervalves of the machine would be arranged s'o that they would discharge into the outer sta-V tionary tub of the machine instead of into the clothes basket, an-d an adjustable water level switch would be arranged so that it would respond to the level of water within the tub. This switch would control the inlet water valves and by presetting the switch, the valves could be automatically closed when the desired amount of water had been introduced into the tub. After the switch or control terminated the filling, the water would then be pumped into the basket by a suitable pump which would be arranged for withdrawing the water from the tub and discharging it into the basket. Only when all the water had been passed into the basket would agitation then comence. Thus by this filling system the desired amount of water would be preselected and passed into the basket without any sensing means being required in the basket itself.

VMice My invention has as its primary object the provision of a new and improved drive arrangement for washing machines whereby the above described presettable, filling system can be readily incorporated within the machines, this drive arrangement providing for the drive of the pump from the main drive motor of the machine for filling the basket without the agitator or other washing means being driven.

It is another, more specific, object of my invention to provide a drive arrangement wherein no shift solenoids or the like are used, which is effective to drive the pump from the main drive motor for filling the basket without driving the agitator, and which after the basket is filled is then effective to drive the pump and the agitator together.

In carrying out these objects I provide a drive arrangement which includes a stepping clutch connected between the drive motor of the machine and the transmission mechanism for operating the agitator. This stepping clutch is so arranged that the first time the motor is rotated in a given direction, no driving torque is transmitted to the output member of the clutch. But when the motor is stopped and then rotated in the same direction a second time, the clutch thereupon drives its output member and thus the mechanism for operating the agitator. The pump is directly driven from the motor so that it is driven wherever the motor is rotated, and thus it will be seen that the first time the motor rotates, only the pump is driven, and the second time the motor rotates, both the pump and the agitator are driven. The first rotation of the ymotor thereby provides for the filling of the basket from the tub and the second rotation of the motor provides for agitating and thereby washing the clothes.

In addition to providing for filling the basket without agitation, it is also desirable that 'the drive arrangement provide for draining the tub of any water in it after the washing operation, before the basket is rotated for the centrifugal extraction operation. By draining the tub prior to the commencement of the spin or centrifugal eX- traction operation the likelihood of the occurrence of Suds locking is greatly reduced. Suds locking is, of course, the term used for the condition when an excess quantity of suds in the tub retard the basket rotation so that the clothes are not spun at the desired speed.

Thus a further object of my invention is to provide a new and improved, single motor drive arrangement which in addition'to providing for filling the basket without agitation, also provides for draining the tub without spinning the basket. Also, still another object of my invention is to provide a reversing motor drive arrangement wherein the drive motor is reversed to change from agitation to spin and vice versa, which will produce both those results, i. e. basket filling without agitation and tub draining without spin.

Inl carrying out these latter objects, I provide in one form'of my invention -a drive arrangement including a transmission mechanism which operates the agitator within the basket when driven in one direction, and which rotates the basket at high speed when driven in the other direction. This mechanism is driven by means of a reversible drive motor, and connected between the motor and the mechanism is a stepping clutch having two steps in both directions. By steps l means a first or non-driving operation and a second or driving operation. The pump is driven directly from the drive motor and is so arranged that it discharges into the basket when the motor rotates in one direction, and discharges to the drain when the motor rotates in the other direction. Upon the first rotation of the drive motor the pump is driven to till the basket, but the clutch does not transmit any drive to thetransmission so that the agitator remains stationary. Once the basket is filled, the drive motor is stopped and then once more rotated in the same direction. As a result -of the pause the clutch progresses so as to pick up the transmission, and thus the motor drives thevagitator concurrently with the pump upon its second rotation. A washing action is therefore produced in the basket. Next the drive motor again pauses and then rotates in the reverse direction. The pump being driven in the reverse direction now empties the tub to the drain, but the clutch does not transmit any drive to the transmission mechanism whereby it and the basket remain stationary. After the tub is drained, the motor pauses another time and then rotates once more in the reverse direction. This time the mechanism is driven to rotate the spin basket for centrifugal extraction, and currently the pump rotation is resumed to discharge the extracted water to the drain. Thus with this drive arrangement both the filling of the basket from the tub without agitation, and the emptying of the tub without basket rotation, as well as the normal washing and extraction operations, are accomplished with a single drive motor and without any shift solenoids or the like being required.

In order to produce some of thee abovementioned washing machine improvements my invention also has as one of its objects the provision of a new and improved stepping clutch means which may `be used in the drive arrangements. More specifically, it is another object of my invention to provide a new and improved stepping clutch means which will not transmit any drive to its output member the rst time its input member is rotated 1n a given direction, and which will then automatically drive the output member' when the input member is rotated in the same direction a second time; and even more particularly it is a further object of my invention to provide a first stepping clutch which will eiect the two sequential steps of no drive and drive in both directions of rotation of itsinp'ut member, and a second stepping clutch which will effect the sequential steps of no drive 'and drive in the one direction of rotation of its input member but which has only a'single or driving step'in the other direction of rotation of the input member.

In carrying out this aspect of my invention I provide clutch means in which the clutching function is effected by a plurality of centrifugal clutch weights. These clutch weights each include an internal recess and are driven by driving pins positioned within the recesses. The recesses are shaped with inner and outer cam surfaces which guide the drive pins upon their rotation. Upon the first rotation of the pins vin a given direction, each pin lodges against an abutment or ledge on the associated inner cam surface, and as a result the pins hold the weights out of engagement with the outputimember of the crutch as they rotate. Thus no drive is transmitted through the clutch. However, when the drive is interrupted, the pins then escape from the abutments or ledges; and upon their next rotation in the same direction they move to the far ends of the recesses. In that position they drive the weights without preventing the weights from engaging the output member, and thereby upon this second rotationa driving force is transmitted through the clutch. The clutch thus provides the sequential steps of no drive and :drive as its input member is rotated in a given direction, stopped and then rotated again in the same direction. By the shape of the cam surfaces the clutch may be arranged so that it has the two steps lin both directions of rotation or only in one direction of rotation.

The subject matter which l regard as my invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the concluding portion of this specification. My invention, however, both as to organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 of the drawings is an elevation, partly in section, of a washing machine of the centrifugal extraction type including a drive arrangement embodying my invention in one form thereof;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view showing the arrangement yof the electrically controlled hot and cold water supply valves included within the machine;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view in exploded form showing the parts of the new and improved stepping clutch included within the machine in detached relation to each other, this clutch embodying one aspect of my invention;

Fig. 4 is a plan View of the assembled clutch of Fig. 3 with the upper plate removed and with the clutch at rest;

Fig. 5 isa view similar to Fig. 4, but showing the clutch elements at the first or no drive step of operation with the clutch input member rotating counterclockwise;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 4 but showing the clutch elements at thee second or drive step of operation with the clutch input member rotating counterclockwise;

Fig. 7 is a schematic diagram of an electric control system for controlling the operation of the washing -machine;

Fig'. 8 is a cam chart showing in extended form the surfaces of the various timer driven cams included in thc control system of Fig. 7, thereby to illustrate the sequence of operation of the switches controlled by the cams; and

Fig. 9 is a plan View of a modified stepping clutch 9 with the upper plate removed vand with the clutch at rest, this clutch also embodying my invention and having a construction in which a two-step clutching action takes place while rotating in one direction and a single step clutching action takes place while rotating in the opposite direction.

The automatic washing machine Referring now to Fig. l I have shown therein an automatic washing machine of the vertical axis type. This machine, as will be described in detail hereinafter, includes a new and improved drive arrangement whereby certain stages of the machine operation, particularly the lling and draining stages, may be carried out in a very advantageous manner. The machine includes an outer casing or cabinet within which is positioned an imperforate tub or container 2. The casing 1 is provided with a rigid base frame 3 and the tub Z is suitably supported from that frame. The cover 4 of the casing includes a removable lid (not shown) whereby clothes may be inserted into and removed from the machine. A backsplash panel 5 is mounted at a convenient location upon the cover and serves to mount and enclose, among other elements, a portion of the apparatus used for controlling the water supply to the machine.

Within the tub 2 is a generally imperforate spin extraction type basket 6 in which clothes are placed to be washed by oscillation of an agitator 7. During the washing operation the basket is held stationary. Thereafter, the cleansing -liquid is centrifugally extracted from the clothes by rotating the basket at high speed. During this spinning extraction operation of the basket and agitator are-rotated as a unit and the liquid is discharged through openings 8 at the baskets upper edge. This used water is collected in and removed from the tub 2. "the basket may also be provided with a suitably mounted inwardly directed ange 9 adapted to support an annular weight 10 serving as a stabilizing element during rotation of thc basket and its contents. Water is supplied to the interior of the basket by a spout 11 in a manner later to be described. Adjacent its bottom, the basket is provided with a plurality of holes 6a serving the dual purpose of re circulating water from the basket to the tub and for vent-1 ing from the basket any soil or sand which tends to collect therein during the washing operation. Supplementary washing materials, such as detergents, bleaches and the like, are added directly to the water in basket 6 by any convenient means.

The basket and agitator are respectively mounted n concentric independently rotatable shaftsdriven by a transmission mechanism indicated generally at 12. The transmission assembly 12 is so arranged that when its vinput pulley 12a is driven in one direction, it effects oscillation of the agitator within the basket, and conversely, when the pulley 12a is rotated in the other direction, it rotates the basket and agitator together at high speed for centrifugal extraction. Mechanisms of this type are well known and thus the mechanism 12 as such forms no part of the present invention. For example, a mechanism such as is disclosed in Woodson Patent No. 2,751,773 which is owned by the General Electric Company, assignee of the present invention, may be emplo-yed.

The transmission mechanism 12 may be mounted in a suitable manner in the central bottom portion of tub 2 and is sealed thereto by a resilient boot 13.

A drive motor 14 mounted Within casing 1 serves to drive the mechanism through a clutch 15 which is mounted on the motor shaft 16 and which has an output pulley 17 arranged to drive the input pulley 12a of the mechanism through a belt 18. The construction and arrangement of the clutch 15 which forms one important aspect of my invention will be described in detail hereinafter. At selected intervals during the washing cycle, with motor 14 rotating in one direction, pulley or sheave 17 is driven to effect oscillatio-n of the agitator, and with the motor rotating in the other direction, the sheave isdriven in the opposite direction to effect rotation of the basket and agitator together.

Motor 14 is directly coupled, by means of a shaft 42 connected to the motor shaft 16 and passing through` the clutch-means 15, to a direction responsive pump 20, the inlet of which is connected to the bottom of tub 2 to draw water from the tub. The pump is mounted on the bottom of the tub and is connected to shaft 42 by a ilexible connection 21 so that rotation of the motor in either direction simultaneously rotates the pump in the same direction as the motor. Water entering the pump from tub 2 is directed, depending upon the 1direction of the pump rotation, into either a washer discharge conduit 22 leading to the house drain, or to a recirculation conduit 23 leading to the top of the basket through spout 11. When the pump is driven in one direction, the water is 4discharged into the conduit 22, and when it is driven in the opposite direction the water is dis^hreed ino the conduit 23. Specifically, when the reversible motor 14 rotates in the agitate direction, the pump 20 is driven in the direction to cause the water to be pumped into recirculation conduit 23; and when the motor rotates in the spin direction, the pump 20 is driven in the direction to cause the water to be pumped into the discharge conduit 22. A suitable direction responsive pump which will produce this result is described and claimed in my copending application Serial No. 468,460, filed November 12, 1954, and assigned to the same assignee as the present invention.

The reversible drive moto-r 14 has a conventional start winding 14a (Fig. 7), a running or main winding 14h, a centrifugal cut-out switch 14e for the start winding, and a supplementary centrifugal switch 14d serving a purpose later to be described.

Within the machine there is provided a presettable iilling means whereby the operator may introduce a variable amount of wash water into the wash basket prior to the commencement of the washing action. This means or arrangement allows the operator to pre-select the amount of water to be introduced into the basket and then leave the machine without being present throughout the iilling operation. ln the arrangement the water is first introduced into the outer stationary tub 2 of the machine and then is pumped from there into the clothes basket. A presettable water level control is provided which isre- `sponsive to the water level within the tub, and by setting this control the operator may determine the amount of water which in introduced thereby to provide the proper amount for the size of the -clothes load which she wishes to wash. When the selected amount of water has been introduced into the tub the water level control terminates the filling operation and energizes the motor 14. The motor 14 immediately begins to drive the pump 20 so as to pas; the water into the basket 6 through the hose 23. But due to the action of the stepping clutch 15, the agitator remains stationary so that the basket is filled before any washing action occurs. Only when Suicient time has elapsed for allor substantially all of the water to be pumped into the basket is the agitator then oscillated within the basket. There is thus no dry agitation with possible tearing of the clothes. The agitator is placed in operation through the stepping clutch 15, as will be described hereinafter, by momentarily stopping the motor 14 and then rotating it again in the same direction. This filling arrangement wherein the desired amount of water is first introduced into the tub and is then pumped into the basket, thereby provided for the accurate pre-selection of the water level in the basket without requiring any water sensing means within the gyrating basket itself.

The valve means for introducing the water into the tub 2 are shown in Figs. 2 and 7. A suitable valve 25 connected to a hot water supply and controlled by a solenoid 26 is arranged for discharging hot Water into a mixing spout 27 leading into tub 2. A second valve 28 connected to a cold water supply and controlled by a solenoid 29 is arranged for discharging cold water into the same mixing spout. Preferably the valvesare opened when their solenoids are energized and closed when they are de-energized. By means of a known type of manually operable switch, shown schematically at 30 in Fig. 7, the operator may use only hot water or a fixed mixture of hot and cold Water for washing.

Mounted upon panel 5 is a pressure actuated control,

switch 31 having a knob 32 for selective setting of the switch. Extending from said switch housing into the bottom of tub 2, in the water collecting region thereof,

is a pressure tube 33 open at its lower end 34 into which.

Water accumulated in tub 2 may rise to a level determined by the level of the water in the tub and by the resisting action of the air compressed in tube 33 by the water rising therein. The upper end of the tube communicates with the lower portion of the housing of switch 31 (Fig. 8) within which is contained a diaphragm 35 adapted to determine the position of a switch arm 36 with respect to contact 37, in accordance with the pressure of the air beneath the diaphragm. By means of a suitable biasing spring 38, the control knob 32 may determine the pressure at which the switch arm is actuated to cause the breaking of the circuit through the solenoids of the filling valves. p

As a result -of this construction which permits the selected amount of water for a given load of clothes to be deposited into the tub, the precise amount of water required for a given washing operation may be readily determined and supplied. Once the tub is filled with the desired amount of water, the water is then pumped into the clothes basket before agitation begins.

stepping clutch 15.

The stepping clutch Referring now to Figs. 3 to 6, there is shown a preferred form of my new and improved stepping clutch 15 particularly suited for use in the above-described automatic Washing machine. It will be understood however that the clutch is not necessarily limited to use in a washing machine, but rather may be used in any suitable application.

As seen in Fig. 3, the clutch includes a bottom plate 4t) having a central hub 41 with the driven shaft 42 extending upwardly therefrom. The plate 40 is adapted to engage with the intermittently rotatable driving shaft 16 of the drive motor 14 and to be driven thereby.

This actiou 1 as will be explained lbelow in detail, is eectedthrough Spaced from the plate 40 is an upper plate 45 having a central aperture 46 through which shaft 42 extends, this plate 45 being further provided with spaced holes 47 and 48. Extending from plate 40 are two drive pins 49 and 50 fixed to that plate and having shoulders against which plate 4S is adapted to rest, and with the distal ends of the pins having threads upon which nuts may be tightened to form the plates into a rigid housing for a pair of radially movable clutch members 60 and 61.

The pins 49 and 50 also prevent relative rotation between the upper and bottom plates and may be aided by an irregular shaped face 51 on the shaft 42 engaged by a similar face 52 in aperture 46. Hollow cylindrical rollers 53 and 54 surround the drive pins and are freely rotatable therearound in order to reduce friction.

As a part of the power take-off means for the clutch,

a clutch drum 55 is journalled on the shaft 42. Thisdrum has a depending skirt 56 and a hollow hub portion 57 containing the power take-off sheave 17 with which the belt 1S or equivalent means may engage. They drum skirt preferably extends downwardly far enough to encompass the lower edge of bottom plate 40 and is provided on the entire periphery of its interior wall with a clutch lining 58, as seen in Figs. 4 to 6.

A pair of massive, interiorly recessed clutch weights 60 and 61 are loosely mounted between plates 40 and 45 for radial movement under centrifugal forces with respect to those plates and to the intermittently rotatable driving shaft 16. These weights are formed with outer peripheral porions 62 and 63 having the same curvature as drum skirt 56, and carrying clutch linings 64 and 65, respectively. At their inner central portions these weights are formed with generally semi-cylindrical hubs 66 and 67 adapted to abut against each other and to surround huh 41 when the clutch is at rest.

Suitable intermediate end walls integral with the outer peripheral portions and inner central portions join these respective portions in each clutch weight to form a balanced mass, both clutch weights preferably having the same mass. Resilient means under tension, such as biasing springs 68 and 69, are connected between the two clutch weights in the end wall regions thereof and normally hold the semi-cylindrical hubs 66 and 67 in contact with each other. In this normal position the weights or shoes do not engage the output drum S. An antifric tion plate 7G of hardened metal is attached to the inner face of bottom plate 40 and provides a surface along which the two clutch weights may slide. This permits the two weights to accelerate together at start and prevents interaction between the weights.

In the clutch which has two steps, i. e., a no drive step and a drive step, in either direction, each clutch weight is provided with dual, mirror-image cam recesses into which the respective drive pins extend. In clutch weight 60, the outer cam surfaces in the recess meet at an inwardly directed cusp 72 and the inner cam surfaces meet in an outwardly directed notch 73 facing the cusp 72. The notch is formed with spaced side walls against which the drive pin 49 may engage when driving the weight 6G at the tirst step of the clutch operation, and a detent spring 74 biased outwardly toward cusp 72 is mounted in the notch to permit the pin to pass between the notch and cusp while the pin is driving the weight but to prevent the pin from edging backward past the cusp when no longer driving the weight. Similarly, the outer cam surfaces meet, in clutch weight 61, at an inwardly directed cusp 76 and the inner cam surfaces meet in an outwardly directed notch 77 facing the cusp, and within the notch 77 there is mounted a detent spring 78 biased outwardly toward cusp 76 and serving an analogous purpose to that of the companion spring 74 In each clutch weight the space within the recess between the inner and outer cam surfa-ces is greater in the region near the end walls and least in the region near the detent springs.

In fact, the space between such sur# faces at the latter region is insufficient to permit the pins to move hrough the notches until the detent springs are compressed by the driving action of such pins.

Assuming the clutch to be in the condition shown in Fig. 4, and that the drive shaft 16 begins to rotate counter-clockwise as Viewed in that figure, the rotation of the drive shaft drives the plate 40 and the pins 49 and 50 counterclockwise. Although the weights 60 and 61 are also rotated due to the friction between them and the plat-e and the pins, the plate and the pins initially rotate relative to the weights 60 and 61 until 'the pins are guided by the outer cam surfaces of the recesses of the weights into the notches 73 and 77 respectively. At that time the weigh-ts are rot-ating fast enough so that centrifugal force has moved them radially outwardly from their normal positions, but as the pins move into the notches they depress the detent springs 74 and 78 land thus are able to move past the cusps 72 `and 76. However, after the pins pass the cusps, they then lodge against the side walls of the notches on the far side of the cusp not being able to pass the notches due to the radial displacement of the weights from their normal positions. The disposition of the pins and the weights at this point is clearly shown in Fig. 5. With the pins y49 and 50 lodged against the side w-all of the notches 73 and 77 in this manner, they cannot move relative to the weights but rather drive the weigh-ts with them. The weights as they are driven, however, cannot move -outwardly any further due to the blocking action of the pins. The eins specifically 'hold the weights in the position of Fig. 5 so that they do not engage the friction surface or linings of the drum 55. This 'operating condition with the pins `being locked frrrn further `movement relative to the weights, and with the weights themselves being positively held out of engagement with the drum 55, represents the first step in the clutch operation. It will be noted incidentally that during the first step the pump shaft 42 mounted on the plate 40 is driven continuously at motor speed.

This first or no drive step of the clutch operation continues so long as the motor continues to rotate in the same direction. To proceed to second or drive step, it is necessary for the drive shaft 16 to stop rr at least slow down to a point where the springs 68 and 69 are able to retract the clutch weights or shoes to their normal pesitions. A-s the drive shaft stops or slows down sufficiently to permit the springs 68 and 69 to pull the weights toward each other, the drive pins escape from the notches 73 and 77 yand are thereby free to move forwardly in lthe lclutch recesses when the counterclockwise rotation of the shaft 16 and the drive plate 4t) is resumed. The detent springs 74 .and 78 prevent the pins from moving rearwardly back past the cusps Ias the clutch decelerates. When Ithe counterclockwise rotation is resumed 4after the pins are freed fno-m the notches, the pins then move to the position shown in Fig. 6 where they engage the weights at the far or leading ends of their recesses (leading when the direction of rotation is counterclockwise). Due to this engagement the pins drive the weights at shaft speed, and due to the width of the recesses at their ends, the pins do not prevent the weights from engaging the skirt 56 of the output drum 55. Rather the weights or shoes move outwardly under the centrifugal force created by their rotation until they clutch firmly to the output drum. This, of course, connects the output drum to the plate 4i) and thus to the input shaft 16 so that the output drum is -driven at shaft speed. This represents the second or drive step of the clutch operation in the counterclockwise direction and will continue so long as the input shaft is rot-ated in that direction. It willl be understood that the pump .shaft 42 is driven during the step just as during the first step.

In a similar fashion the clutch moves through two steps of operation when rotated clockwise by the drive shaft 16 from the position shown lin Fig, 6. Upon the first clockwise notation of the drive shaft the pins 53 and 54 gseasot l move back into the notches 74 and 77, passY the cusps 72 and n76 and engage the lthen far side walls of the notches. The pins and weights then rotate together with the weights locked out of engagement with the output drum. This first non-driving step of clockwise operation continues until the drive shaft stops or slows down sufciently to allow the springs 63 `and 69 to pull the weights back to their normal positions. The pins are then freed from the notches and upon subsequent clockwise rotation ofthe clutch move to lthe far ends of the recesses (the right hand end of the recess of weight 60 fand the left hand end of the recess of weight 61 as viewed in Fig. 4). This engagement between the pins and the weights causes them to rotate together 'and the weights then move out clutching firmly to Ithe output drum. Thus in the second lstep of clockwise rotation also, the output drum "S is driven at shaft speed. In both steps of clockwise rotation the pump shaft 42 is, of course, driven directly and oontinuously from the drive shaft 16.

Summing up with Aregard to the clutch of Figs. 3-6, it will thus be seen that the clutch progresses through two stages of operati-on in each direction lof rotation. Upon the first rotation in either direction the clutch does not operate the output -o-r power take-off drum. However, during the second rotation in the same direction it clutches the output drum directly to the inout shaft.

Referring to Fig. 9 I have shown therein a modied form of my new and improved step-ping clutch. In this clutch a the clutch weights 60a and 61a are similarly mounted, `as described with respect 4to clutch weights 60 and 61, but are provided with -an irregularly shaped cam recess in which inwardly directed, centrally located cusp-s 72a and 76a lare employed. Instead of using notches, however, laterally spaced abutments 74a and 78a are formed in ythe inner -cam surfaces to be engaged respectively by drive pins 49 and 50 when they are rotated in one direction by drive pl-ate 40a, but not to be engaged thereby lwhen they a-re rotated in the opposite direction. Accordingly, when rotated in one direction (countercLockwise as shown) the drive pins move continuously from rest to the -far end of the recesses and the cluch has a one step driving acti-on when rotated in that direction. On the contrary, when rotated in the opposite direction, the pins mov-e into engagement with the abutments 72a and 76a on the first rotation of the clutch and must 'be released therefrom by a stopping of Ithe clutch rotation 'before continuing to move t-o the far end of the cam recesses. -In this latter direction of rotation, clutch thus has a two step action similar to the clutch of Figs. 3 to 6 when Iit moves in Ithat direction. As will be noted, the recesses in clutch weights 60a and 61a have a suitable irregularly shaped configuration to permit the described operation, which configura-tion differs from the dual, mirror-image recesses of Figs. 3 to 6.

As will be seen from the foregoing description, my invent-ion includes ya reversible clutch which may be driven by an intermittently rotatable shaft and which, in one form -may engage a power take-oft means during alternate periods of rotation of the clutch driving shaft in `a given direction. Also, in another form, it may engage the power take-oft means immediately when driven in one.

direction, but only during alternate periods of notation when driven in the opposite direction.

The washing machine equipped with the clutch having two steps in either direction With the foregoing description in mind, reference is now made to Fig. 4, showing the assembled stepping clutch 15 at rest withpins 49 and 50 in engagement with the outer cam surfaces of the lrespective clutch weights,

The drive motor 14 is energized and begins vto driv the" clutchl hub 41 in the counterclockwise direction. As hub 41 begins to turn counterclockwise, shaft 42 drives pump 20 counterclockwise to pump the water from the tub 2 into the basket 6 through the recirculation conduit 23. The mechanism 12, however, remains at rest no driving force being transmitted to it by the clutch 15. As the clutch rotation begins, pins 49 and 50 act against the outside cam surfaces of the respective recesses in the clutch weights, overcome the inertia of those weights and cause them to start to rotate. As they rotate, the heavy clutch weights tend to move outwardly under centrifugal force. But concurrently the drive pins compress the respective detent springs in the notches 73 and 77, move pastv dead center in those notches and drive against the far walls of the notches as shown in Fig. 5,. The clutch weights are then held by the pins, even though they are rotating at shaft speed, so that they cannot move suiciently far outwardly to engage their clutch linings 64 and 65 with the clutch lining 5S of drum 55. Accordingly, the washer mechanism 12 continues to remain at rest and the pump 20 continues to be driven in a counterclockwise direction to ll the basket from the tub.

Following a predetermined time of this operation, known as the wash fill of the basket, as will later be eX- plained, the drive motor stops and hub 41 comes to rest with the clutch weights retracted and with the drive pins resting in the recesses of the clutch weights in a position similar to but opposite to the position shown in Fig. 4. Following this pause, the drive motor again rotates in a counterclockwise direction driving pump 20 counterclockwise during the wash agitate step. At this time, the drive pins 49 and 5t) move along the outer cam surfaces of the clutch weight recesses into the position and to Fig. 1 showing the clutch 15 incorporated within.

shown in Fig. 6. The pins then'drive the weights .so that centrifugal force throws the clutch weights outwardly. Since the pins do not limit the radial movement of the weights in this position, clutch linings 64 and 65 engage with the lining 58 of the drum skirt 56 to provide the second step of the clutch action. During this phase the output drum then drives the mechanism 12 so as to oscillate the agitator 7 within the basket 6 while the shaft 42 simultaneously continues to drive pump 20 to provide for recirculation of the wash water.

After a predetermined time of this operation, motor 14 stops and the springs 68 and 69 retract the clutch weights to their normal position. After this pause motor 14 is driven in a clockwise direction, the pump 20 turning clockwise and draining tub 2. Meanwhile, the drive pins move to the first clutch step similar to Fig. 5 but engaging the opposite side walls of the notches 73 and 77 for driving in the reverse direction, and the clutch drum does not turn. Thereafter, another pause occurs wherein the weights are retracted, and when the motor 14 is again driven clockwise, the pins move to the sec-A ond-step drive position similar but opposite to Fig. 6 for driving the mechanism 12 in a reverse direction. The mechanism 12 is thus engaged for a clockwise rotat tion.- At this time the spin-drain operation occurs with the basket being lrotated at high speed and with the pump continuing to pump to the drain hose 22. Thereafter the motor 14 again stops and following the filling of the tub with rinse water, the motor turns in a counterclockwise direction, as rst explained. The rinse water is thus pumped into the tub while the mechanism 12 remains stationary. At this time, of course, the clutch weightsinove to the rst step position of Fig.`5.` There after, the motor stops and-again starts in a counterclockwise direction 'for the rinse agitation step at which time the pins again occupy the position of Fig. 6 and the mechanism 12 is driven counterclockwise again for oscillating the agitator. The pump is also driven in a direc-Av tion for recirculating the rinse water. Following a pause.

the motor again turns clockwise for a second drain step during whch the tub is drained with no drive to the mechanism 12. The motor then pauses, and again turns clockwise for a final spin drain step, during which the clutch weights again cause the mechanism to rotate .in a clockwise direction, spinning the basket '6. The pump is also driven to drain the machine. Upon conclusion of this last step, the washing cycle is completed and the clutch weights come to rest as indicated in Fig. 4.

The control system and detailed operation ofthe washing machine equipped with the clutch having vtwo steps in either direction Preferably, the several operations of the washing machine of the invention are under the control of program control means suitably mounted on the machine convenient to the operatorand driven by two suitably related timing motors. The program control or timer means, which I identify generally in Fig. 7 by reference 90, may embody two cam banks and switch arrangements.

The timer means 90 has a plurality of cams 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96 and 97, also designated respectively by numerals I, Il III, IV, V, VI, and VII, as shown in Fig. 7 for easier reference to the cam chart of Fig. 8. Cams 91, 92, 93, 94 and 95 are keyed to a shaft 98 driven by timer motor 99 while cams 96 and 7 are keyed to a shaft 100 driven by timer motor 101. The connections of the espective timer motors to their driven shafts are such that the cams may be manually operated to advance the o timing systems to any selected operating position, or, as is frequently desirable, to shorten any particular operation cycle.

The impedance of the timer motors is appreciably greater than that of the water valve solenoids 26 and 29 and they, in turn, have an impedance appreciably greater than that of drive motor 14. The reason for these relationships is explained hereinafter. The shaft 100 of timer motor 101 is mounted and arranged so that its movement is checked by a stationary stop (not shown) after it rotates through a prescribed period of operation, all for a purpose later to become apparent.

Each cam is provided with one or more raised portions and one or more low portions or valleys for the purpose of actuating spring biased switch contact arms in the manner known to the art, such raised and low portions being omitted from the diagrammatic showing of Fig. 7 but being shown in extended form in Fig. 8. Cams 91 and 96 each operate a single throwswitch, designated respectively, by 102 and 103, and cam 95 operates a single throw switch 107 which is effective in its operated position to close two contacts 107a and 107b simultaneously to a third contact 107C. Cams 92, 93, 94 and 97, however, each operate double throw switches shown respectively at 104, 105, 106, 107 and 108. The right hand contacts of each of these switches are both connected to the same electrical point, and thus the operation of any of the switches from one portion lto the other bridges one or the other of its left hand contacts to the same point. The engaged left hand contact will therefore be referred to hereinafter from time to time as the bridged contact. For identification the upper left hand contact of each of these switches carries the identification number of the switch with the subscript A and the lower left hand contact has the subscript B. The circuit is connectable to a source of electrical energy, for example 110 volts, 60 cycle, A. C., by a conventional plug P. The main leads of the circuit comprise the supply conductor 109 and the return conductor 110. A manual on-off switch 111 may be provided in the supply conductor to place the machine in operative condition and to render the machine inoperative at any time during the washing cycle. A, lamp 136 byits illumination indicates when themachineisin operation. The energizing circuit for the lamp at the 12 start of the operation is from plug P through closed switch 111, conductors 109, 112, bridged contact 10411 of switch 104, conductors 113, 137, 133, 139, lamp 136 and conductor 110 back to plug P.

As shown in the cam chart of Fig. 7, my improved washing machine using the stepping clutch of Figs. 3-6 employs an operating cycle consisting of eighteen separate and distinct stages. At the beginning of the first stage, which comprises the filling of the tub with wash water, the circuit is as shown in Fig. 7. The machine begins to ll with water entering the tub 2 through spout 27 by reason of the hot Water solenoid 26 being energized by the following circuit: from the plug P through conductor 109, with switch 111 closed, conductor 112, bridged contact 104a of switch 104, conductors 113, 114, solenoid 26 of hot water valve 25, conductors 115, 116, Ybridged contact 108e of switch 108, conductors 117, 127, the bridged contacts of switch 103, conductor 118, run winding 14b of drive motor 14, conductors 122 and 123, the bridged contacts of switch 102 and conductors 124, 125, and 110 back to plug P. The valve circuit also includes the start winding 14a of the drive motor connected in a parallel path with the run winding 14b by a branch circuit starting with conductor 11S and passing through conductors 119 and 140, bridged contact 106e of switch 106, conductor 141, start winding 14a, the normally closed, motor operated centrifugal switch 14C, conductor 120, the bridged contact g of switch 105 and conductor 121 to the conductor 122. Timing motors 99 and 101 are also connected in the circuit being connected in parallel with the drive motor windings, but they do not run as the drive motor windings create an effective short circuit across them. Moreover, because the impedance of solenoid coil 26 is much higher than that of the windings of the drive motor 14, practically full line voltage is drawn across coil 26 to energize it and thereby open valve 25, and as a result water is admitted, but neither the timer motors or the drive motors will start. Had the operator chosen to use a mixture of hot and cold water for washing, manual switch 30 would also have been closed before starting the cycle of operation whereupon the branch circuit of conductor 128, solenoid 29, and conductor 129, would have connected the valve solenoid 29 in parallel with the solcnoid 26 and a mixture of hot and cold water would have been discharged through spout 27 into the tub. lt will be understood that during the above described stage of operation the several control cams are not turned since neither timer motor is running.

After the preselected amount of water is deposited in tub 2, water level control switch 31 is actuated to close the contacts 36, 37 and thereby through conductors 130 and 131 to short out the water valve solenoids. The amount of water introduced before the switch 31 is actuated is, of course, controlled by the setting of the dial 32 which allows the operator to select the proper amount of vwater for the particular clothes load being washed. The closing of the water level control 31 with its shorting out of the valve solenoids applies full line voltage across the windings of drive motor 14. At thc same time, line voltage is applied to timing motor 99 through its connection with the above described circuit by conductors 132 and 133 and to timing motor 101 through its connection with the circuit by conductors 134 and 135, and these motors now begin to rotate their respective cam drive shafts 98 and 100. With the illustrated connection of the start winding 14a the driveI Water l second stage wherein the basket is filled is indicated in Fig. 8 as the wash till of thebasket., During this stage the drive pins of the stepping clutch 1S move to the position shown as the tirst step in Fig. 5, in which position clutch drum S5 is not engaged by the clutch weights and therefore washer mechanism 12 is not driven. VThus thebasket is filled without any operation of the agitator occurring. When the drive motor comes up to speed during this stage of Aoperation the centrifugal starting winding switch 14e opens and the centrifugal switch 14d on motor 14 closes. The opening of the switch 14e, of course, removes the start winding 14a from the circuit, and the closing of switch 14d shorts out the valve solenoids and keeps power on the timer and drive motors irregardless of the water level in the tub 2 and the condition of the switch 31.

Shortly after timing motor 101 begins to rotate, cam 97 shifts its associated switch 108 with a snap action to bridge contact Sb and to open contact 108a. This removes the water valve solenoids and the motor centrifugal switch 14d from the circuit completely, and instead energizes the conductor 117 and thus the timer and drive motors from the conductor 131 through the conductors 137 and 138. Since the drive motor rotation is not affected by this switching change, the pump thus continues to transfer water from the tub to the basket with no agitation of the water and clothes by agitator 7. Preferably pump 20 and its delivery conduits have a capacity greater than the drainage capacity of holes 6a so that water remains stored in basket 6 while the pump is rotating counterclockwise. As the water level in the tub falls the switch 31, of course, opens contact 37 but with contact 108b bridged this has no effect in the circuit. After suiiicient time has elapsed for the pump 20 to pass a full load of water from the tub into the basket, timing motor 101 by means of cam 96 opens switch 103. This de-energizes both the drive motor 14 and the timer motor 99 but the timer motor 101 continues to rotate. The motor 14 being de-energized comes to rest with the stepping clutch resting in the ready positio-n similar to Fig. 4, but with the drive pins in the recesses opposite to those shown in that figure. This forms the initial pause or third stage of washer operation with the basket iilled to the proper level with wash water. As the motor 14 stops, the centrifugal switches 14e and 14d assume their normal positions, switch 14e closing and switch 14d opening.

As timer motor 101 continues its rotation, it closes switch 103 and thus re-establishes the circuit to the Windings 14a and 14b of motor 14 permitting that motor to continue to rotate counerclockwise. Since the connections o-f the start winding 14a have not been changed, the direction of rotation is as before. The stepping clutch now moves to its second step as shown in Fig. 6 with the weights 60 and 61 engaging the clutch drum 5S and driving agitator 7 through the mechanism 12. Pump 20 continues to rotate counterclockwise and recirculates the water discharged into tub 2 through the apertures 6a back into the basket 6. Timer motor 99 likewise resumes its rotation upon the closing of switch 103 and continues to rotate until a preset agitate time elapses. As drive mo-tor 14 rotates, its centrifugal starting winding switch 14e again opens and its centrifugal switch 14d again closes. Timer motor 101 continues in operation during the first part of this fourth or wash agitate stage of the machine operation, and sometime after the stage commences, it operates the switch 108 with a snap action to bridge contact 108e. This results in the drive and timer motors being'again energized through the centrifugal switch 14d instead of through the conductors 137 and 138. the contact 108:1 is bridged, the timer motor 101 then reaches a stationary stcp (not shown) which stalls it;

i and thereafter the motor 101 and its associated cams 96 and 97 remain in the same position for the rest of the Once machine operation. In this position contacts 103, are, of course, closed as well as the contact 10811. The timer motor 101 is not damaged by being held in a stopped rotor condition due to its high internal impedance. Motor 101 will, of course, have to be reset to its initial operating position by manual means at the conclusion of the operating cycle and before a new cycle can be initiated.

The fourth, or wash agitate stage of operation continues with the time motor 99 and the drive motor 14 operating until the timer motor 99 opens switch 102. The opening of switch 92 de-energizes the drive. motor 14 and causes the machine to pass into its fifth stage of operation which is another pause. As the motor 14 stops, the centrifugal switch 14d opens, but the timer motor 99 continues in operation being energized through the Valve solenoid 26. Specifically, the timer motor 99 is energized by a circuit passing from plug P through conductor 109 with manual switch 111 remaining closed, conductor 112, bridged contact 104a of switch 104, conductors 113 and 114, solenoid 26, conductors and 116, bridged contact 108a of switch 108, conductors 117, 127, bridge contacts 103, conductors 118, 132, timing motor 99, and conductors 133, 125, 126 and 110 back to plug P. The timer 99 is so constructed that its impedance is much greater than that of the valve solenoid 26, and thus it takes up most of the supply voltage and continues in operation. The solenoids 26, or both solenoids 26 and 29 of switch 30 is closed, assume so little of the Voltage that they are not effective to cpen their respective valves.

T o point out positively at one place the impedance relationshps between the valve solenoids 26 and 29, the timer motor 99 and the drive motor, it will be understood that when the drive motor windings 14a and 14!) and the timer motor 99 are connected in parallel branches in series with the valve solenoids, then the solenoids are operated, but when the drive motor windings are removed from the circuit and only the timer motor is connected in series with the solenoids, then the timer motor is operated and the solenoids are not. This latter condition of course exists during the pause after the washing operation. Incidentally, although current is passing through timer motor 101 at this time, the motor does not turn due to its mechanically blocked condition, and the switches associated with cams 96 and 97 remain in their last position, namely with contacts 108:1 and 103 bridged.

During the pause while switch 102 is still open, the timer motor 99 actuates the switches 104, 105 and 106 associated with cams 92, 93 and 94 with a snap action to bridge contacts 104b, 105k and 106b. Also, the timer 99 actuates the switch 107 with a snap action to bridge contacts 107er and 10717. Movement of the switches 105 and 106 to contacts 10512 and 10617 reverses the polarity of the start winding 14a of drive motor 14; and the operation of the switches 104 and 107 completes a circuit for energizing the timer motor in which the water valves are completely shorted out. This circuit aiso is effective to energize the windings of the drive motor 14 once the switch 102 is reclosed. With the switches 104 and 107 operated this circuit energizing the timer motor 99 is as follows: Ccmmencng with plug P it extends through switch 111, conductors 109 and 142, bridged contacts 10'7b and 107C of switch 107, conductors 137 and 113, bridged contact 10411 of switch 104, conductor 143, contact 10811 of switch 100, conductor 117, closed switch 103, and conductors 118, 119 and 132 to the timer motor 99, and thence is completed back to the plug through conductors 133, and 110. Energized through this circuit the timing motor 99, of course, continuesto rotate;

and this continued rotation then causes the switch ass`oci- The closing of the switch 102 specifically energizes the windings of the drive motor between the conductors 118 and 124 which at this point have the line voltage across them. The conductor 124 is of course connected directly to the one side of the plug P by the conductors 125, 126, and 110, and the conductor 118 is connected to the other side of the plug by the switches 107, 104, 108 and 103 in the manner explained immediately above with regard to the timer motor circuit. However, due to the operation of the switches 105 and 106 to bridge contacts 105b and 106b the polarity of the starting winding 14a is now reversed from what it was during the earlier rotation of the drive motor. Thus the drive motor begins to rotate in the clockwise rather than in the counterclockwise direction. To trace out the circuits for the drive motor windings, it will be seen that the main winding 14b is connected directly to the one energizing conductor 113, and that the other side of the windings is connected to the conductor 124 by conductors 122 and 123, and switch 102. With regard to the start winding 14a it is energized (in reverse polarity) by a circuit passing from conductor 118 through conductors 119 and 144, bridged contact 105!) of switch 105, conductor 120 and normally closed centrifugal switch 14C to the winding itself, and completed therefrom to the conductor 124 through conductors 141, bridged contact 106b of switch 106, conductors 145, 122 and 123, and switch 102. As soon as the motor 14 comes up to speed, the centrifugal switch 14e opens this circuit and de-energizes the start winding.

With the direction of rotation of the drive motor reversed. the pump also runs in the reverse, or clockwise direction. The pump thus discharges any wash water in the tub 2 and the water which drains into the tub through the apertures 6a into drain conduit 22. In other words it begins to drain the wash water from the machine. With the reversal of the drive motor, however, no drive is conveyed through the stepping clutch 15 to the transmission mechanism 12. Rather all that happens is that the drive pins 49 and 50 of the stepping clutch move to a position similar to that shown in Fig. 5, except that they rest on the opposite sides of the notches 73 and 77 from the position shown therein. The clutch weights thus do not engage clutch drum 55 and no driving force is transmitted to the mechanism 12. Accordingly, the pump 20 functions to drain the tub Z while the basket 6 remains stationary. This draining of the tub prior to the spinning of the basket for centrifugal extraction, it has been found aids greatly in avoiding the problem of suds locking. Suds locking is, as is well known in the art, the phenomenon wherein the basket rotation is retarded by the suds created when the wash water is rapidly discharged into the tub during a centrifugal extraction operation.

This sixth, or wash drain, stage of operation continues long enough for a considerable portion, if not all of the wash water to drain from the basket 2 into the tub through the holes 6a, and be discharged therefrom by the pump and the discharge hose. Then the timing motor 99 opens switch contacts 102 and the drive motor` 14 stops, thus beginning the seventh stage of operation which comprises a third pause step. During this pause the pins of the stepping clutch 15 escape from the notches of the cam recesses as the motor comes to rest.

The timing motor 99 terminates this pause stage after a short period by closing switch contacts 102 which again starts drive motor 14 in its reversed or clockwise direction of rotation. Therstepping clutch now moves to a position similar to that shown in Fig. 6, but with the shaft 42 turning in a clockwise direction and with the drive pins engaged at the ends of the recesses in the clutch weights opposite to those shown in that gure. The resulting engagement of the clutch drum 55 by the weights then drives mechanism 12 in a direction to spin the basket 6. The spinning of the basket extracts the water contained in the clothes by centrifugal action, and discharges it intothetub through the drain holes S in the upper. edge ofthe basket. Since the pump 20 is simultaneously being i@ driven in its clockwise direction, the water spilling into tub 2 through the drain openings 8 in the basket is discharged'into drain conduit 22.

This eight, or Wash spin stage of operation continues until the timing motor 99 again opens switch contacts 102 to begin the ninth stage of operation comprising the fourth pause step. Upon opening of switch contact 102 the drive motorstops, but timing motor 99 continues to run. As the timing motor 99 continues its rotation (its circuit being initially unaffected by the opening of switch 102) it operates the switch 104 with a snap action so that it disengages the contact 104b and bridges the contact 104a again. This removes the short from the water valve solenoids, but the timer 99 continues to run being now energized through the solenoids 25 and 29. The solenoids are connected to the one supply line 109 by both switches 104 and 107, and the timer 99 is connected serially with the solenoids in the same manner as before by the switches 108 and 103. As the timer rotation continues, the cams 933 and 94 operate switches 105 and 106 to bridge the respective switch contacts 105a and 106a and return the start winding 14a to its original polarity.

After these switching operations are completed, the pause is then terminated by the timer motor closing switch 102. This connects the windings of the drive motor in parallel with the timer motor 99, and immediately the supply -divides differently with the water valve solenoids being operated and with the timer motor ceasing to rotate.

With the Water valve solenoids 26 and 29 opening the water valves, the tenth, or rinse ll of the tub stage begins and is conducted in the same manner as described with respect to the rst, or wash ll of the tub stage, except that with the switch contacts 107a, 107b and 107C associated with cam 95 are now closed, whereas they were open during the initial wash tub ll. It will be seen that with contacts 107a, 107b and 107e closed, both the hot water solenoid 26 and the cold water solenoid 29 are energized and thus a mixture of warm water enters the tube. yThis is the case even though manual Water temperature selector switch 28 is open.

At the conclusion of the rinse ll of the tub stage, which is terminated by the closing of the water level switch 31 when the pre-selected amount of water has been introduced, the eleventh or rinse fill of the basket stage begins. The closing of contact 37 of switch 31 shunts the water valve solenoids with their high impedances and again applies full voltage across the drive motor 14 and timer motor 99. Since the polarity of the start winding 14a was returned to its original condition during the previous pause the motor 14 drives pump 20 counterclockwise again to pump Water from tub 2 through the recirculation conduit 23 and spout 11 into the basket 6. At the same time, the stepping clutch is moved to the position of Fig. 5, the clutch drum not being driven and the mechanism 12 thereby remaining stationary. Of course, as the water level in the tub falls the switch 31 opens, but power is kept on the drive motor and the timer motor 99 by the motor operated centrifugal switch 14d which also shorts out the water valves as soon as the motor cornes up to speed. Further, as the timer continues to run during the stage, it operates the switch 104 to bridge contacts 104b and thereby places a positive short across the water valves even when the centrifugal switch 14d later opens. This filling stage continues with both the drive motor 14 and the timer motor energized until sufficient time has elapsed for a full load of water to be pumped from the tub into the basket. At that time the timer motor opens the contacts 102 to pass the machine into its next or twelfth stage of operation.

At the beginning of the twelfth stage of operation, comprising the tifth pause step, timer motor 99 continues to run through the switches 107, 104, 10S and 103 being unaffected by the opening of the switch contacts 102.

Brive motor 14 however, stops being de-energized by contacts 102, and the pins 49 and 50 of the stepping clutch escape trom the notches 74 and 77. Thus the stepping clutch is readied to drive the output drum 55 and thereby the mechanism 12 upon the next clockwise rotation of the drive motor.

The pause continues until the timer motor 99 closes switch contacts 102 by means of cam 91 to begin the thirteenth, or rinse agitate, state of operation. With the contacts 102 closed, drive motor 14 begins to rotate counterclockwise and is energized in parallel with timer 99 through switches 107, 104, 108 and 103'whereby it begins to rotate counterclockwise again, the polarity of the start winding not being changed during the pause. This causes the drive pins of the stepping clutch to move to the position of Fig. 6, and thereby the clutch drum 55 and, through it, mechanism 12 are driven. The agitator 7 is thus driven to agitate the clothes in the rinse Water while pump 20 is driven in the recirculate direction to pump any rinse water spilling into the tub back into the basket.

Following this action, which continues long enough to rinse the clothes thoroughly, the fourteenth stage of operation comprising the sixth pause is initiated. To terminate the rinsing action and begin the pause, timer motor 99 opens switch contacts 102 by means of cam 91. This de-energizes'the drive motor 14 and stops the drive of the pump 20 and the mechanism 12. As the timer 99 contniues to rotate with switch contacts 102 still open, the cams 93 and 94 operate switches 105 and 106 to bridge switch contacts 10512 and 10611 respectively. As above described, the bridging of contacts 105b and 106]; serves to reverse the polarity of the start winding and thereby to reverse the direction of rotation of motor 14 to a clockwise direction when it is again energized. The pause is terminated and the next stage of operation begun when the timer then closes switch 102 to energize the drive motor.

As motor 14 begins to rotate clockwise in the fteenth, oi rinse drain stage of operation, pump 20 is driven clockwise to pump the rinse water from the tub into waste conduit 22. The stepping clutch meanwhile moves to a position similar to that shown in Fig. except that hub 41 is rotating clockwise and the drive pins rest on opposite sides of the notches from the position indicated in that figure. Thus the tub is drained without drive being transmitted to the mechanism 12.

After'this stage has continued long enough for the basket to drain into the tub through holes 6a, at least to a substantial extent, and for the water to be discharged by the pump 20, the stage is then terminated by the timing motor 99 and opening switch contacts 102. This de-energizes the drive motor 14 so that it comes to rest. The next or sixteenth stage of operation thus comprises the seventh pause step. With the motor at rest, the pins 49 and 50 of the stepping clutch escape from the notches 74 and 77, whereby upon the next clockwise rotation, the clutch will transmit drive to the mechanism 12.

The pause is terminated when timing motor 99 through cam 91 closes switch contacts 102. This re-energizes drive motor 14 so that it resumes its rotation in a clockwise direction to begin the seventeenth, or rinse spin stage of operation. The stepping clutch 15 as the motor accelerates, moves to a position similar to that of Fig. 6 but wherein it is rotating clockwise with the drive pins at the ends of the recesses in the clutch weights opposite to their position shown in that figure. Clutch drum 55 is thus engaged by the weights and drives mechanism 12, which, in turn, spins basket 6 for extracting the rinse water from the clothes. Water spilling into tub 2 is removed into drain conduit 22 by the pump 20 which is rotating clockwise. After this rinse spin action has proceeded for a suitable length of time, the timer 99 then operates the switch 107 so as to disconnect contact 107e from contacts 107a and 107b. This removes power from all the Y motor 14 and the timer motors 99 and 101. The machine thereby comes to a stop and the clean clothes may be removed from it.

ri his final "oit` or inoperative condition of the machine for convenience, is termed the eighteenth stage of operation. in order to begin a subsequent cycle, timing motors 99 and 101 must be reset to their initial position, as above described. 'Ihe resetting of the timing motors, of course, returns the various sequence control means to their original positions shown in Fig. 8.

The washing machine equipped with the clutch having two steps in one direction and only a single step in the other direction Referring now to Fig. 9 a brief description will be given of the operation of the washing machine if when it is equipped with the clutch 15a instead of with the clutch 15. The clutch 15a as pointed out above has two steps when driven in one direction but has only a single step when driven in the other direction. When incorporated in the washing machine the clutch 15a provides for the same lling and washing steps as the clutch 15, that is, it provides for pumping the till water from the tub of the machine into the basket without driving the agitator, and for then driving the pump and the agitator together after the basket has been filled. But unlike the clutch 15 it does not provide for draining the tub before the spinning action begins. Rather as soon as the motor changes direction, the basket is immediately rotated as the pump is driven.

1t will be understood that when used with the clutch 15a, the transmission mechanism 12 is arranged somewhat diiferently than above described so that it oscillates the agitator 7 when the output drum 55 of the clutch is rotated in the clockwise direction as viewed in big. 9, and drives the spin basket when the drum is rotated in the counterclockwise direction. Also it will be understood that the pump 20 and its outlet conduits 22 and 23 are so arranged that when the pump shaft 42 turns cloc. wise as viewed in Fig. 9, the pump discharges into the recirculation conduit 23, and when the pump shaft turns counterclockwise, the pump discharges into the drain conduit 22.

Now assuming the tub 2 to have been tilled with water to the desired level so that the water level control 31 of the machine is actuated, the following action will occur when the clutch 15a is used in the machine: The drive motor 14 is energized by the control 31 and begins to drive the clutch hub 41 in the clockwise direction. As hub 41 turns clockwise the pump shaft 42 drives pump 20 clockwise to pump the water from tub 2 into the basket 6 through the recirculation conduit 23. The mechanism 12 however remains at rest, no driving force being transmitted through the clutch 15a. When the rotation begins, the pin 49 is at the left hand end of the weight 60a as viewed in Fig. 9 and the pin 50 is at the right hand end of the weight 61a. As the clockwise clutch rotation begins, the pins 49 and 50 being driven by the driver 40a, bear against the outside cam surfaces of the recesses in the weights, overcome the inertia of the weights and cause them to start to rotate. As they rotate, the heavy clutch weights tend to move outwardly under centrifugal force. But concurrently as the weights start to move outwardly, the pins 49 and 50 move relative to the weights until they engage the abutments 74a and 78a. The pins then lodge against the abutments and through them drive the clutch weights at shaft speed. However, as they drive tlie'clutch weights, the pins prevent the weights from moving sutiiciently far outward to engage their linings 64a and 65a with the drum 55. Accordingly, the drum 55 and the mechanism 12 continue to remain at rest while the pump 20 is driven in a clockwise direction to till the basket from the tub.

Following a predetermined time of this basket filling desde@ faces of the recesses of the clutch weights and thence into fl' a position where thev engage the far ends of the recesses. In other words as viewed in Fig. 9 the nin 49 moves to the far right end of the weight 60a and the nin 50 moves to the far left hand end of the weight 61a. The pins then drive the weights so that the centrifugal force throws the weights outwardlv. Since pins do not limit the radial movement of the weights in this position` the linings 64a and 65a of the weights engage the lining 5S of the drum skirt 56 to drive the drum and thereby provide second step of the clutch operation. During this phase the drum S drives the mechanism 12 so as to oscillate the agitator 7 within the basket, while the shaft 42 simultaneously continues to drive pump 20 to provide for recirculation of the wash water.

After a predetermined time of this operation, the motor I4 stons and the springs 69a and 69a retract the clutch weights to their normal positions shown in Fig. 9. After this pause the motor 14 is then enervized so that it turns in the counterclockwise direction. This of course turns the nume 2Q in the counterclockwise direction so as to drain the tub 2. At the same time the pins 49 and 50 move relative to the clutch weights passing along the outer surfaces of the recesses in the weights. When the pins reach the cusns 72a and 76a. the weights move outwardlv allowingA the pins to nass the cusps. and then the pins move to the far ends of the recesses in the weights. In other words` the cam 49 moves to the far left hand end of the recess in weight 60a as viewed in Fig. 9, and the soin 50 moves to the far right hand end of the recess in weight 61a. When they reach this position the pins then drive the weights at shaft speed and the weights move outwardly so as to engage the drum 55, their radial movement not being limited by the pins. The drum 55 is thus driven at shaft sneed and it in turn drives the mechanism 12. Since the direction of rotation is reversed, the mechanism 12 rotates the basket 2 at high speed for centrifugal extraction.

This centrifugal extraction stage with the basket rotating and with the pump discharginginto the drain hose 22 continues for a suitable length oftime. Thereafter the motor 14 again stops and the tub is iille'd with rinse water to the preselected level. Following the filling of the tub with rinse water, the motor then turns in a clockwise direction again. The rinse water is thus pumped into the basket while mechanism 12 rotates stationary. At this time, of course, the drive pins 49 and 50 move to the lirst step position of their clockwise rotation wherein they engage the abutments 74a and 78a. Thereafter the motor stops briefly and then again starts in the clockwise direction for the rinse agitation step. When the motor stops the pins 49 and 50 of course escape from the abutments, and then move into the far ends of the recesses as the clockwise rotation is again begun. Thus the mechanism 12 is driven clockwise again for oscillating the agitator while the pump is also driven for recirculating the rinse water.

After clothes have been rinsed for a suitable time, the motor pauses briefly and following the pause the motor against turns counterclockwise for a second extraction stage. The change in the direction of rotation, of course, causes the pump to pump into the drain conduit 22 and the pins 49 and 50 move vfrom the one end of the clutch weights to the other end `in a single step so that the mechanism 12 is driven to rotate the spin basket. After this spin extraction stage has continued for a suitable 20 length of time, the Irnoto'r is de-'energiz'ed completing the washing cycle, with the drive pins in the proper position to begin another washing cycle at a later time.

A detailed electric circuit is not shown for the machine equipped with the clutch 15a since the lcircuit of Fig. 7 can be used merely by modifying the surfaces of certain of the cams. The cams would, of course, have to be modified so as to omit the wash drain and rinse drain stages and the pauses immediately following them.

While in accordance with the patent statutes I have described what at present are considered to be the preferred embodiments of my invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the invention and it is therefore aimed in lthe appended claims to cover all such modifications as come within the true spirit and scope of the invention.`

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a clothes washing machine having a tub, a spin extractor basket in said tub, washing means in said basket, water supply means feeding into said tub, a drive motor for driving selectively said washing means and said basket to produce washing and extracting operations, means including a stepping clutch connecting said washing means and said basket to said motor, said clutch having two steps in at least one direction of rotation of its input member and progressing from the lirst step to the second step upon the stopping of said motor between rotations in said one direction, said clutchv being ineffective to transmit torque in said first step and being effective to transmit torque in said second step, a pump driven by said motor and arranged to pump water from said tub into said basket when driven in said one direction, means responsive to the accumulation of a predetermined amount of water in said tub for shutting oft" said water supply means and for currently energizing said motor to rotate in said one direction, whereby the lling of the tub is terminated and the Water is pumped into said basket without said washing means being driven, and control means for temporarily de-energizing said motor after Athe water is pumped into said basket, thereby to cause said clutch to progress to said second step, and for then energizing said motor to rotate again in said one direction whereby said washing means is driven in said basket for the washing operation.

2. In a clothes washing machine having a tub, a spin extractor basket in said tub, washing means in said basket, and water supply means feeding into said tub, a drive motor for driving selectively said washing means and said basket tovproduce washing and extracting operations, means including a stepping clutch connecting said washing means and said basket to said motor and arranged for driving said washing means when said motor rotates in one direction and driving said basket when said motor rotates in the reverse direction, said clutch having two steps in both directions of rotation of its input member and progressing from the iirst step to the second step upon the stopping of said motor between rotations in the same directions, said clutch being ineffective to transmit torque in said first step in both directions and being effective to transmit torque in said second step in both directions, a pump driven by said motor and arranged to pump water from said tub into said basket when driven in said one direction and to pump water from said tub into a drain when driven in said reverse direction, means responsive to the accumulation of a predetermined amount of water in said tub for shutting otr said water supply means and for concurrently energizing said motor to rotate in said one direction, whereby the filling of thetub is terminated and the water is pumped into said basket without said washing means being driven, and control means for temporarily de-energizing lsaid motor after the water is pumped into said basket, thereby to cause said clutch vto progress to said second `step in said one direction, for then energizing said motor to rotate' again in said one direction whereby said washing means is driven in said basket for the washing operation, for next energizing said motor to rotate in the reverse direction thereby to pump water from sald tub to said drain without said basket being driven, and for then de-energizing said motor temporarily after the water is pumped into said drain, thereby to cause said clutch to progress to the second step in the reverse direction, and for subsequently energizing said mo-tor to rotate again in the reverse direction whereby said basket is rotated at high speed for said extracting operation.

3. A stepping clutch having a no drive step and a drive step in at least one direction of rotation of its input shaft, said clutch comprising an output drum, a plurality of clutch weights disposed within said drum and rotatable with respect to said input shaft, said clutch weights being normally out of engagement with said output drum, drive means for driving said weights from said input shaft, whereby said weights move outwardly toward drum under centrifugal force, said drive means retaining said weights out of engagement with said drum during the first rotary operation of said shaft in said one direction, whereby said clutch is ineffective to transmit driving torque, and said drive means allowing said weights to engage said output drum upon the second rotary operation of said shaft in said one direction after a decrease in the speed of said shaft sufficient to release said weights from the effect of centrifugal force, whereby said clutch is effective to transmit torque.

4. A stepping clutch having a no-drive step and a drive step in at least one direction of rotation of its input shaft, said clutch comprising an output drum, a plurality of clutch weights disposed within said drum and rotatable with respect to said shaft, means normally biasing said clutch weights out of engagement with said output drum, a plurality of pins driven by said shaft and engaging said weights to drive said weights upon rotation of said shaft, whereby said weights tend to move outwardly toward said drum under centrifugal force, said weights including abutment means engaged by said pins during the first rotary operation of Said shaft in said one direction to lock said weights out of engagement with said drum, whereby no torque is transmitted by said clutch, and said Weights including end surfaces engaged by said pins upon the second rotary operation of said shaft in said one direction after a decrease in the speed of said shaft sufficient to release said weights from the effect of centrifugal force, whereby said pins drive said weights without preventing them from engaging said drum and torque is transmitted through said clutch.

5. A stepping clutch having a 11o-drive step and a drive step in both directions of rotation of its input member, said clutch comprising an output drum, a pair of clutch weights disposed within said drum and rotatable with re- Spect to said drum, biasing means normally holding said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, said clutch weights each having an internal recess, a pair of pins driven by said shaft and extending into said recesses to drive said weights, with the inner and outer surfaces of said recesses forming cam surfaces for guiding said pins upon rotation of said shaft, said pins cooperating with said cam surfaces to retain said weights out of engagement with said drum upon the first rotary operation f said shaft in either direction, and said pins moving to the far ends of said recesses upon a second rotary operation of said Shaft in the same direction after a decrease in the speed of said shaft sufiicient to release said weight fromthe effect of centrifugal force, thereby to allow said weights to engage and drive said drum during said second rotary operation.

6. A stepping clutch having a no-drive step and a drive step in one direction of rotation of its input shaft and a single drive step in the opposite direction of rotation of its input shaft, said clutch comprising an output drum a plurality of clutch weights disposed within said drum and rotatable with respect to said shaft `biasing means normally holding said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, said clutch weights each having an in-A ternal recess, a plurality of pins driven by said shaft and extending into said recesses to `drive said weights, with the inner and outer surfaces of said recesses forming4 cam surfaces for guiding said pins upon the rotation of said shaft, said pins cooperating with said cam surfaces to retain said weights out of engagement with said drum upon the first rotary operation of said shaft in said one direction, and said pins moving to the far ends of said recesses upon a second rotary operation of said shaft in said one direction after a decrease in the speed of said shaft sufficient to release said weight from the effect of centrifugal force and moving immediately to the opposite ends of said recesses upon the first rotary operation of the shaft in the opposite direction, thereby to allow said weights to engage and drive said drum during second rotary operation of said input shaft in said one direction and during the first rotary operation of said input shaft in said opposite direction.

7. A stepping clutch having a no-drive step and a drive step in both directions of rotation of its input shaft, said clutch comprising an output drum, a pair of clutch weightsv disposed within Said drum and rotatable with respect to said Shaft, biasing means normally holding said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, said clutch weights each having an internal recess, a pair of pins driven by said shaft and extending into said recesses to drive said weights, with the inner and outer surfaces of said recesses forming cam surfaces for guiding said pins upon the rotation of said shaft, the outer cam surface of each recess including an inwardly directed cusp and the inner cam surface of each recess including a notch disposed opposite the respective cusp, said cusps being arranged to guide said pins into said notches upon the first rotation of said shaft in either direction, whereby said pins lodge against the far sides of said notches and retain said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, said biasing means being effective to retract said weights upon the stopping of said input shaft whereby said pins escape from said notches for movement to the far end of Said recesses upon a subsequent rotation of said shaft in the same direction, and said weights being arranged to move outwardly to engage said drum under centrifugal force when driven by said pins from said far ends of said recesses.

8. A stepping clutch having a no-drive step and a drive step in one direction of rotation of its input shaft and a single drive step in the opposite direction of rotation of said input shaft, said clutch comprising an output drum, a pair of clutch weights disposed within said drum and rotatable with said shaft, said clutch weights each having an internal recess, biasing means normally holding said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, a pair 4of pins driven by said shaft and extending into said recesses to drive said weights, with the inner and outer surfaces of said recesses forming cam surfaces for guiding said pins upon the rotation of said shaft, the outer cam surface of each recess including an inwardly directed cusp and the inner cam surface of each recess including an abutment on one side of said cusp, said cusps being arranged to guide said pins against said abutments upon the first rotation of said shaft in one direction whereby said pins lodge against said abutments and retain said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, said biasing means being effective to retract said weights upon the stopping of said input shaft whereby said pins escape from said abutment for movement to the far ends of said recesses upon a subsequent rotation of said shaft in said one direction, said pins passing freely past said abutments into the then far ends of said recesses when rotated in said opposite direction, and said weights being arranged to move outwardly to engage said drum when driven from either of the ends of said recesses by said pins.

9. A stepping clutch having a 11o-drive step and a drive step in both directions of rotation of its input shaft, said clutch comprising an output drum, a pair of clutch weights disposed Within said drum, said clutch weights each having an internal recess, biasing means normally holding said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, a pair of pins driven by said weights and extending into said recesses to drive said weights, with the inner and outer surfaces of said recesses forming cam surfaces for guiding said pins upon the rotation of said shaft, the outer cam surface of each recess including an inwardiy directed cusp and the inner carn surface of each recess including a notch disposed opposite the respective cusp, said cusps being arranged to guide said pins into said notches upon the first rotation of said shaft in either direction, whereby said pins lodge against the tar walls of said notches and retain said clutch weights out of engagement with said drum, resilient detent means mounted in said notches for preventing said pins from moving backwardly past said cusps after once passing said cusps so long as the direction of rotation of said shaft is not reversed, said biasingr means being effective to retract said weights upon the stopping of said input shaft, whereby said pins escape from said notches for movement to the far ends of said recesses upon a subsequent rotation of said shaft in the same direction, and said Weights being arranged to move outwardly to engage said drum when driven by said pins from said ends of said recesses.

10. In a clothes washing machine having a tub, a spin extractor basket in said tub, Washing means in said basket, and Water supply means feeding into said tub, a drive motor for driving selectively said washing means and said basket to produce washing and extracting operations, rneans including a. stepping clutch connecting said washing means and said basket to said motor and arranged for driving said washing means when said motor rotates in one direction and driving said basket when said motor rotates in the reverse direction, said clutch having two steps in said one direction of'rotation of its input member and progressing from the first step to the second st ep upon the stopping of said motor between rotations in said one direction, said clutch being ineiiective to transmit torque in said tirst step in said one direction and being effective to transmit torque in said second step in Said one direction, said clutch having a single torque transmitting step in said reverse direction of rotation of said input member, a pump driven by said motor and arranged to pump water from said tub into said basket when driven in said one direction and to pump water from said tub into a drain when driven in said reverse direction, means responsive to the accumulation of a predetermined amount of Water in said tub for shutting ed said water suppiy means and for concurrerrtlj,I energizing said motor to rotate in said one direction whereby the filling of the tub is terminated and the water is pumped into said basket without said washing means being driven, and control means for temporarily daenergizing said motor after the water is pumped into said lbasket thereby to cause said clutch to progress to said second step in said one direction, for then energizing said motor to rotate again in said one direction whereby said Washing means is driven in said basket for the washing operation, and for next energizing said motor to rotate in the reverse direction thereby to pump said water into said drain and to rotate said basket at high speed for said extracting operation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNETED STATES PATENTS aan mi.. l s

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2561257 *Jan 8, 1946Jul 17, 1951Gen ElectricControl for automatic washing machines
US2639618 *Aug 23, 1951May 26, 1953Gen ElectricTransmission and clutch for clothes washers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2955448 *Feb 10, 1958Oct 11, 1960Gen ElectricClothes washer with an improved water level control system
US2987904 *May 28, 1958Jun 13, 1961Gen Motors CorpDomestic appliance
US3014358 *Jan 3, 1961Dec 26, 1961Gen ElectricClothes washing machine
US3251445 *Mar 23, 1962May 17, 1966Gen Atronics CorpSpeed responsive clutch
US3986373 *Jun 27, 1975Oct 19, 1976The Maytag CompanyDrive system for a laundry apparatus
US4038841 *Aug 13, 1976Aug 2, 1977General Motors CorporationClothes washer spin delay mechanism
US4231237 *Dec 21, 1978Nov 4, 1980General Electric CompanyWashing machine with delayed action drive clutch
US4299319 *Sep 4, 1979Nov 10, 1981General Electric CompanyTwo-speed clutch
US4491210 *Dec 22, 1982Jan 1, 1985Whirlpool CorporationNeutral pump-out for automatic washer
US4566295 *Sep 4, 1984Jan 28, 1986Whirlpool CorporationNeutral pump-out for automatic washer
US5503261 *Jul 15, 1994Apr 2, 1996Automotive Concepts TechnologyBi-directional centrifugal clutch
US6865763 *Jan 23, 2002Mar 15, 2005Maytag CorporationClutch for washing machine and method for using same
US20030135933 *Jan 23, 2002Jul 24, 2003Sears Jeffrey L.Clutch for washing machine and method for using same
US20060191156 *Apr 18, 2006Aug 31, 2006Alan HeinzenCanted manually loaded produce dryer
EP2530198A1 *May 25, 2012Dec 5, 2012Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Washing machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/12.5, 68/23.5, 68/23.7, 68/208, 192/105.0CD, 68/12.24, 192/105.0BA, 68/207, 192/30.00R
International ClassificationF16D43/18, D06F23/04
Cooperative ClassificationF16D43/18, D06F23/04
European ClassificationD06F23/04, F16D43/18