Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2870809 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 27, 1959
Filing dateNov 9, 1955
Priority dateNov 9, 1955
Publication numberUS 2870809 A, US 2870809A, US-A-2870809, US2870809 A, US2870809A
InventorsHerman Feldman, Martin Sams
Original AssigneeHerman Feldman, Martin Sams
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tool handle
US 2870809 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 27, 1959 H. FELDMAN ETAL TOOL HANDLE TORS DIV/M! AITIOP/VEY 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 0 Filed Nov. 9, 1955 Jan. 27, 1959 Filed Nov. 9, 1955 H. FELDMAN ET AL TOOL HANDLE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 L3 1] H3 6 3 I /2 g m I83 .I F1516 INVENTORS. #{RMA/V Fisz DMA/V Mm T/A/ SA 178 ATTORNEY TOOL HANDLE Herman Feldman, Surfside, and Martin Sams, Miami Beach, Fla.

This invention relates to'an improved handle for hand tools such as screwdrivers and the like. i

In using standard screwdrivers, to take one example of a tool to which the present invention is applicable, it is found on many occasions when a hard driving screw is encounteredthat the screw becomes so difiicult to turn thatthe leverage afforded ones hand by the standard screwdriver handle is insufiicientto turn the screw. On such occasions one is apt to use a plyers or wrench to turn the screwdriver, and then only with clumsy, time consuming difficulty. A number of special purpose screwdriver sets have been heretofore suggested that use wrench handles or ratchet mechanisms to increase the leverage but these, in the main, come in a several piece set that is much too bulky as well as expensive for the average householder to buy or use. It is a desideratum, therefore, to provide a simple one-piece screwdriver that may be used as an ordinary screwdriver but that will furnish means for the extra leverage needed when hard driving screws are encountered.

It has heretofore been suggested, and the structure of the improved handle of the present invention also contemplates and embodies, a tool handle modified by the provision of a through opening extending transversely of the tool handle for which converts the handle to a T structure and which implement may be grasped obtaining the increased operating leverage. In such modified tool handles, as suggested by the prior art, the

through opening was usually designed to receive and accommodate a T converting implement of a single crosssectional dimension, which for this reason limited the scope of usefulness of the tool handle. Where the tool opening is designed as by the use of an elongated handle opening the side walls of which are tapered so as to accommodate converting implements of different crosssectional areas, other difficulties are encountered such as the lack of secure fitting of the implement in the handle opening (resulting in the shifting of the implement hand the dropping of the implement from the handle) and also resulting in an undesirable see-saw weavin or wiggling of the implement in the handle.

The prime object of our present invention resides in the provision, in a hand tool, of a handle provided as aforesaid with a through opening extending transversely ofthe handle for the cross-reception of an implement for afiording increased operating leverage, said opening being so designed and constructed whereby implements of differentcross-sectional areas maybereceived by said opening and whereby an implement of a given cross-sectional areamay be fitted into, held within, and preferably locked by the appropriate structural part of said opening.

To accomplishmentof this object and such other objects as may hereinafter appear, our invention relates to the tool handleas sought to be defined in the appended claims taken together with the following specification and the appended drawings, in which: i

Fig. 1 is a vertical elevational view ofa tool handle the cross-reception of an implement.

by said hand of the user for 2,870,809 Patented Jan. 27, 1959 embodying the principles of the present invention and shown applied to a screwdriver;

Fig. 2 is a perspective viewthereof shown to an enlarged scale with a part out off in cross-section in the plane of the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an elevational view of the handle and screwdriver shown in Fig. 1, turned 90 about the axis of the handle, and illustrating the manner in which the tool handle is converted to a T handle;

Fig. 4 is a vertical cross-sectional view of part of the handle shown in Fig. l and drawn to an enlarged scale and also illustrating the manner of its use;

Fig. 5 is a view generally similar to Fig. 1 and showing a modification employing a metal liner or insert for the handle opening;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view drawn to an enlarged scale of the metal liner or insert embodied in the handle of Fig. 5;

Fig. Tis a view similar to Fig. 1 showing a modification thereof;

' Fig. 8 is a view also similar to that of Fig. 5 and showing a further modification;

Figs. 9, 10 and 11 are views of further modifications; and

Fig. 12 is an explanatory view of these further modifications.

Referring now in more detail to the drawings and,

having reference first to Figs. 1 to 4 thereof, the tool handle of our invention is shown exemplified in a handle H associated with the shank S of a screwdriver, the

handle H being forward or provided adjacent its upper end, where the handle is usually held by the hand of the user for operating the tool, with extending transversely of the tool reception of animplement I (which, for example, may be another available screwdriver) and which latter may be grasped by said hand of the user for converting the handle to a T structure to obtain the needed increased a through opening 0 operating leverage. The handle H is preferably made of i arranged longitudinally of the handle in progressively stepped relation. To accomplish this the opposed longitudinal walls a and b of the opening 0 are stepped, i. e. formed to i provide steps s, s to define a plurality of openings lll, 12, 14 and 16 of sequentially decreasing widths arranged as best indicated in Figs. 1 and 20f the drawings in progressively stepped relation. To accommodate the largest size of T implement, the opening 10 is formed 1 with an enlarged lead-in or entrant portion e. By means of this construction, implements of different widths may be received by the opening 0 and an implement of a given width- (or area) such as the implement I illustrated in Figs; 3 and 4 may be fitted into and held within one of said stepped openings which is of a corresponding width or area such as the stepped opening 12 illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4.

This opening of stepped formation servesto accomplish a number of results and advantages that imparts the utility desired for a tool handle of this character. Distinguished from a tool handle adapted to receive an implement only of a given dimension or area, the tool handle of the present invention is capable of receiving implements of different cross-sectional areas, any: one of which may be fitted for use. tapered to accommodate implements of different widths or areas, the desired end results would not be achievable.

handle for the cross- 0, arranged- If the through opening 0 were merely Thereasons for this is that in using a through opening in a handle for receiving a.T implement for extra leverage, one finds that the most convenient way to hold the handle'whi'l'e'drivinga hard turning screw is to have one hand holding the tool shanktS) near the blade end (to kepthe blade from slipping out of the screw head slot), and theot-h'er h'and pressing'palm down' on the top of the handle, the fingers holdingthe crossed or T implernent (to' supply 'thenecessary axial pressure); andwith anon stepped through opening it is found that when a T implement-is insertedand the operator then begins to turn a hard driving screw in a wall or ceiling position, the user 'quickly' finds that as the handle is rotated and then released-to grasp the handle for another turn, the T implement falls out-of the opening. This will transpire-'=every"time-the tool isheld at an angle with respect to the-ground other'than the perfectly vertical position. The inconvenience of having to pick up and replace the T implement after each rotation renderssuch a constructionpractically'useless; Furthermore, even when held in a position such as the vertical position, the T imple-' ment is-subject'to a see-saw'weaving or wiggling in the longitudinally elongated handle opening.

' In the structure of the present invention, where hard turning screws requiring extra leverage are encountered, the=shank=ofany other implement I such as the screwdriver illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings is inserted'in-to an opening part which freely receives the same and is then pressed down into the opening part into which his fitted and held, namely, into one of the stepped openings such'as 10, 12, 14 or 16 of a width or dirnension'corresponding to that of the implement. This action-'wil'l befurther described hereinbelow. I

We have found that an important part of the holding efle'ct of the stepped openings is due to the flexing action of the h-andlewalls at the overall opening 0. As the T implement shank is pressed into the opening part into which it is to be fitted, there is a tendency of the handle walls at-the overall openingto spread due to this flexing action. The sides a and b of the stepped openings may, therefore, be'straight or vertical, the distance between the sides being'made so that the size of any step is slightly less than the" diameterof the T shankfor that size step. Consequently, as the T shank is pressed home a minor arc of the cross-section circle of the T shank first engages the top otits particular step; and upon pressing the T shank 'into its step, the'side walls of the overall opening are spread sufiiciently to permit the needed flexing with a resultant holding andpartly locking engagement of the 'cross-implement'by and between the opposed sides of thereceiving step. Tool handles made out of plastic or wood' are found'resilient'enough to be ideal for enabling the needed flexing; To improve the flexing of thehandle' material in the region adjacent the opening 16, we prefer to provide a cutout or opening portion extending therebelow such as the V-shaped cutout 18 in the-handle atthis" region' as clearly shown in Figs; 1, 2' and 4, and the opening portion which extends above the largest stepped opening also serves to improve the flexing at the upper end of the handle.

in the preferred embodiment of the structure, however,

it is also desired that the T implement, when fitted into' its appropriately stepped opening, may be more securely seated and locked against zigzag or wiggle in the stepped opening into which it is fitted. This we accomplish by having thewalls of at least some of the stepped openings recessed to form a locking seat for'the cross or T implement. Such a recessed construction may, for example,

be formed by having the walls of the stepped openings reversely tapered with reference to the direction of decreasing'widths of' said openings. As is most clearly shownin Figs. 2 and- 4 of the drawings, the walls defining. the op'enings 1'2; 14 and 16 are recessed such as beingreversely tapered-so'th'at they have a keystone" shape in press-section. With this recessed 'step' or reverse lie We have found that there are generally fibe size divisions of screwdriver shank'thicknesses in use, ranging from approximately W diameter to substantially A3" diameter; Ina-preferred structure, however,-we find that four stepped openings, as illustrated, for shanks ranging from 7 3" to the stepp'ed'intervals being of the order of in size are adequate for all general uses.

We have also found that by providing such defined steps (as distinguished from a continuous taper) we are enabled to reduce the" overall length of the opening ,substantia11y, this being reducible to approximately one inch-in size. A structure such 'asis illustrated in the drawings will take in T form standardthicknes's screwdriver shanks from a large'size to"oneof"the smallest; andv in every case the Tscrewdriver'is not only fitted b'utis locked in place so firmly'that'no'side-sway or wiggle is possible.

In Figs. 5 and 6iof"th'e drawings, we show a modification'of'th'e structure of the invention. In this modification the handle '11" isprovided with a metal'linei' or insert L, separatelyshown in Fig. 6, which is formed with the through opening 0 corresponding to the opening 0 which is formed in the handle itself "in the invented form illustratedinFigs. 1to-4, exceptthat'for this modification,

the enlarged lead-in or entrant portion'is ornitted, re

fore improve the appearance of the handle structure.

The interior-opposedwalls a; b of'the metal liner or insert are stepp'ed' and preferably recessed infthe' same manner as'illustr'ated inthe form of the invention'in Figs. 1 to '4, producing the stepped openings'10, 12", 14. and' 15' of which the last three'steps are also recessed ones.

Fig: 53 0f the-drawings also illustrates the manner'in which implements-of any-of'four different diameters are capable of being fittedinto and locked by thefour diflerent stepped openings-1 Again; to improve the'flexing ofthe' handle rnaterial' inithe region adjacentthe-opening 16 we may provide a cutout suchxas-the V-shaped'cutout 18 "shown in'Fig. 1 but which may merely" be a'sli't such =as 18" in the handle at this regioni(see Fig. 5).- a a In Fig; 7 of the drawings'we show anothermodification of a handle H in which the-stepped openings of the through opening 0 points upwardly (instead' of downwardly asin the preceding figures); in 'which case the'fT implement would be lockedwithtaniupward pressure ex erted by the fingers of the. user." In-this'istructure'then the longitudinal wallsof'the opening O arestepped to provide the upwardly arrangedseries' of stepped openings 10 12 14 and 16 In this'-modification the wall'softhe largest opening'lfl areal'so" recessed or-reversely tapered and thisop'en'in'g is' preceded by-an enlarged lead in or entrant portion e In'th'e further rnodification of'the invention showirin Fig. 8', the handle H 'isprovided witha rn'etal'liner or insert L which-has its'iriterior walls shaped in arcs of decreasing diameters thereby providing openings 10 12. 14- and" 16 or sequentially" decreasing diameters or widths, again arranged longitudinally of the handle in progressively. steppedrelation; The opening103-is' here also preceded'by the lead-in or entrant portion 23 This? form of the invention. alsdprovidesia recessedconstruo' tion'and one in 'which'tlie stepped openings are adapted to receive implements of different circular cross-sections with an accurate and rigid fitting. H

In Figs. 9 through 12 we show views of further modifications of the invention, these views showing the same modified construction except that in Fig. 9 the overall opening is made without, while in Figs. 10 through 12, the overall opening is made with a metal liner. The parts in these modifications which are similar to the parts of the previously described views are indicated by similar but suitably primed reference characters. In these modifications, the structure is shown, by way of example, with the stepped openings pointing upwardly (as is also the casein Fig. 7).

Fig. 12 illustrates the flexing action that takes place in the Walls of the overall opening (moving from the full line position'to the dotted line position) as the T implement I is moved from the entrant portion e to its clicked in seated and locked position in the stepped opening (the implement movingfromthe full line position to the dotted line position shown). Each step is recessed ditferently than in the preceding provide the seating and locking step for the selected T implement; and each recessed step is so designed and constructed as to require less force to'insert or click in the T implement than to withdraw it, and to consequently provide for a secure locking and holding of the implement in its seated position evenwith a small inserting force.

This latterfunction is accomplished by making the wedge angle of insertion flatter thanthe wedge angle of withdrawal of the T implement. Each step is made to comprise a straight part s followed by a recessed part r, the diameter d (see Fig. 10) of the straight entrant part s being less than the diameter D of the T implement for that step. The result is that the inserting angle indicated as 21 (see Fig. 12) is smaller than the withdrawing angle indicated as n',lthese being, the respective angles made by the incident tangent to the T implement with a vertical drawn at the point of tangency. It will be noted that the force component flexing apart the walls of the opening to permit the insertion-of theT into the step is a function of the cosine of the inserting angle and that the withdrawal force component is similarly a function of the cosine of the withdrawal angle, with the result that the inserting angle, being smaller, makes it easier to click in the T than to withdraw it or click it out. As a consequence, the implement is securely seated in a locked position in the selected step without requiring a large inserting force, or stated otherwise the T is capableof being clicked in quite easily, yet it is held so tightly that it cannot be loosened while being used even with the most diflicult turning screws.

While in these various modifications of the invention we show the same applied to a screwdriver, it will be understood that the tool handle of the present invention is intended for other tool applications as well, such, for example, as nut drivers, reams, awls, files, universal clip in or chuck handles that take various types of tool shanks (screwdrivers, nut drivers, etc.). In short, any type of rotating tools where it is desired on comparatively irregular occasions to have extra leverage or turning case may be employed with the handle of the present invention.

The structure, operation, uses and advantages of the tool handle of the present invention will in the main be fully apparent from the above-detailed description thereof. In its application for use with a screwdriver (as an example of the various uses to which the handle may be put) the advantages are apparent. The overall opening, while taking all size Ts is small enough to be included in standard size tool handles. On easy turning screws the device may be used like any standard screwdriver. On hard turning screws, where extra leverage is desired, the shank of any implement such as any screwdriver may be readily inserted into the opening of the handle, fitted therewith and locked therein, thus forming a rigid T or crossed implement. After use the implement may be readily withdrawn or removed. The handle may be used figures to I by the householder and skilled workman alike. For the householder who usually does not. own an expensive special purpose wrench handle tool set, a tool embodying the handle of the invention is an ideal mechanical and economical solution for the problem of extra leverage, especially when any one of a dozen common household items such as screwdrivers, nut drivers, tubing, dowels, icepicks, etc., may be used for the T implement. For the skilled workman, who may already own a special purpose wrench handle tool set, the handle of the present invention is of great convenience because it is capable of simple and very rapid use. With no moving parts to wear out or break, the tool handle is rugged and lasting.

While we have shown the tool handle of our invention in its preferred form, it will be apparent that changes may be made in the structure and design thereof without departing from the spirit of the invention defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. Ina hand tool, a handle adapted to be held by a hand of the user for operating the tool, said handle being provided longitudinally thereof with a through opening extending transversely of-the tool handle for the crossreception of'an implement which may begrasped by said hand of the userfor obtaining increased operating leverage, the opposedlongitudinal walls of said through openingbeing stepped to define a plurality of openings of sequentially decreasing widths arranged longitudinally of the handle' in progressively stepped relation, the said through opening including a portion extending beyond the largest stepped opening. and aportion extending beyond the smallest stepped opening, the said longitudinal walls defining said through opening being resilient to permit said walls to flex transversely of the length of said handle, whereby implements of different Widths may be received by said through'opening and an implement of a given width may be resiliently fitted into and held within one of said stepped openings which is of a corresponding width. t 2. In a hand tool, a handle adapted to be held by a hand of the user for operating the tool, said handle being provided with a through opening extending transversely of the tool handle for the cross-reception of an implement which may be grasped by said hand of the user for obtaining increased operating leverage, the opposed longi tudinal walls of said opening being stepped to define a plurality of openings ofsequentially decreasing widths arranged longitudinally of the handle in progressively and definitely stepped relation, whereby implements of different width may be received by said opening and an implement of a given width may be fitted into and held within one of said stepped openings which is of a corresponding width, thewalls of at least some of said stepped openings being recessed to form an implement seat whereby a selected Width implement may be seated and locked against wiggle in the recess-stepped opening into which it is fitted.

3. In a hand tool, a handle adapted to be held by a hand of the user for operating the tool, said handle being provided with a metal insert formed with a through opening extending transversely of the tool handle for the cross-reception of an implement which may be grasped by said hand of the user for obtaining increased operating leverage, the opposed longitudinal walls. of said metal insert being stepped to define a plurality of openings of sequentially decreasing widths arranged longitudinally of the handle in progressively stepped relation, whereby implements of different widths may be received by said opening and an implement of a given width may be fitted into and held within one of said stepped openings which is of a corresponding width, the walls of at least some of said stepped openings of the metal insert being reversely tapered with reference to the direction of decreasing widths of said openings to form an implement seat whereby a selected width implement may be seated and locked against wiggle in the stepped opening into which-it is plurality of openings of sequentially: decreasing widths 1 arranged longitudinally. of the handle in progressively stepped relation, andsaidwall's beingr-possessedof an inherent resiliency to' perniit said' 'wallsto flex, whereby implements of diiferent-widths may be receivedby said openingrand an'implernent'of agiven widthmay be re- ;siliently fitted into and held within one of said" stepped openings which is of a corresponding width, the walls of at least some of said stepped opening being recessed to form an implement seatwhereby a selected width implement m'ay beseated=and locked'against-wigg'le in the stepped opening into which-it isfitted.

5. In a handitool, ahandle adapted to be held by. a hand of the user for operating the'tool, said handlbeing provided with a metal insert formed with a through opening extending transversely of-the tool handle for the cross-reception of an implementwhich'm-aylbe grasped by said hand of the-userfor obtainingr increased'operating leverage, the opposed longitudinal walls of said metal insert being stepped to define aplurality of openings of sequentially decreasing widths arranged longitudinally of the handle in progressively stepped relation, said opposed walls'beingflpos'sessed of an inherent'resiliency to permitsaid walls to flex, whereby implementsof difierent widths may. bereceived by said openingand an implement-of a given width: may be resiliently fittedinto and held within one of said stepped openings" which is of a'correspoiiding width, the walls of atleast some of said stepped openings of the metal insert being recessed to form an implement seat whereby a selected widthj implement may-be seated and locked against wigglein the stepped opening into which it is fitted. t

6. In a hand tool, a handle ad-apted'to be held by a hand of the user for operating the'tool, said-handle being provided with ametal insert formed with a through open ing extending transversely of" the tool handle for the cross-reception of an'implement which may be grasped by said hand of the user for obtaining iacraseu operating leverage the o posed longitt'idinal walls" of said 111611211 iiise'rt being ste'ppe'dftd' define a plu'rality 'of openiri-gs of sequentially deerasing-widtlis arranged"longitudinally of the handle in progressively stepped re ation, said opposed wal1s'being'-pbssesed of an inherent resilineyto permit said walls to fleir; whereby implements of different widths may" be'rec'eivedby' said opening'and an implement of a given width may'be resiliently' fitted into and'hel'dwithin one of said stepped'openingswhich isof a corresponding width, the walls of a'tleast soiiie-of said stepped openings of the metal insert being reverselytapered with reference to the direction of decreasing widths of said openings whereby a sel ected widtli' implement inay' b e lok'ed'agains't wiggle in the stepped'opening into which it isfi'ttedl 7; In a-hand tool, a no'n metalh'andle' adaptedto' be held b'y'a hand j ofth'e use'r'for operating the tdol, said handle being provided longitudinally? thereof with a through opening linedwith a metal "ins" extending transverely' f thetoorhandw for" the cros eeepti'on of an implement which may be gras edby said hand of the user for obtaining'inereasedoperating lev'rag'e','-'the op.- posed longitudinal walls'of said metal insert being. stepped to define'a plurality of openings fof'sequentially decreasing'widt hs 'a'rranged'longitndinally of the handle in progressively" stepped rel'ation, the opposed walls o f said throughepenin including the walls of saidmetal insert being resilienfto permit saidw'a'll's -to flex transversely of the length of said handle, whereby implements of different widths may be received by said through opening and an: im'pIement'Ofa given width may, be resiliently fitted intor and held within one ot said stepped openings which is of acorresponding width.

References Cited in the file of this patent- UNITED STATES PATENTS 64,662- 167,368 172,277 763,745 1,097,043 1,469,792 Johnson Oct;9,'

FORE IGN PATENTS 154,715 Great 'Britain d Dec. 6, 1920" 968,485

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US64662 *May 14, 1867 Self and phillipp fermier
US167368 *Jun 16, 1875Aug 31, 1875 Improvement in pipe-wrenches
US172277 *Apr 5, 1875Jan 18, 1876 Improvement in tools
US763745 *Oct 14, 1903Jun 28, 1904John M OstrumCompound tool.
US1097043 *Mar 28, 1913May 19, 1914Francis M NolderWrench.
US1469792 *Mar 6, 1922Oct 9, 1923Johnson Nels ARemovable-blade screw driver
FR968485A * Title not available
GB154715A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3561510 *Oct 9, 1968Feb 9, 1971Peter F JohnsonScrewdriver with torque amplifying means
US5590432 *Apr 3, 1995Jan 7, 1997Taskey, Sr.; Aaron R.Fastener driving wire uncoiling tool
US5782570 *Oct 23, 1996Jul 21, 1998Chicago Pneumatic Tool CompanyAlignment of attachment(s) mounted on a power tool
US6209425 *Jul 30, 1998Apr 3, 2001Bobby HuDriving device for hexagonal wrenches
US6230593 *Aug 20, 1999May 15, 2001Chih-Ching HsiehHandle structure for a screwdriver
US6378402Aug 1, 2000Apr 30, 2002Black & Decker Inc.Hand tool
US6401576 *Jan 24, 2001Jun 11, 2002Fu-Hsiung WuHand tool
US7344118 *Dec 8, 2004Mar 18, 2008Ian SambergHolder for supporting a screwdriver from the handle thereof
US9398929 *Nov 11, 2011Jul 26, 2016Depuy (Ireland)Pin impactor
US20090272238 *Nov 5, 2009David Harrisscrew driver
US20130296875 *Nov 11, 2011Nov 7, 2013Depuy (Ireland)Pin impactor
US20150183101 *Aug 26, 2013Jul 2, 2015Titan Product Development, LlcMultipurpose Bicycle Tool
DE19634985A1 *Aug 29, 1996Mar 5, 1998Engelbert GmeilbauerScrewdriver-type tool
DE19634985C2 *Aug 29, 1996Jun 24, 1999Engelbert GmeilbauerHandwerkzeug zur ‹bertragung eines Drehmoments
EP1043125A1 *Apr 5, 2000Oct 11, 2000Maxtech Manufacturing Inc.Hex key gripping aid
Classifications
U.S. Classification81/489, 81/177.5, 81/436
International ClassificationB25G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25G1/005
European ClassificationB25G1/00S