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Publication numberUS2872762 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1959
Filing dateSep 27, 1956
Priority dateSep 27, 1956
Publication numberUS 2872762 A, US 2872762A, US-A-2872762, US2872762 A, US2872762A
InventorsJack Dreeben
Original AssigneeJack Dreeben
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Forming and filling packages and apparatus therefor
US 2872762 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 10, 1959 J. DREEBEN 2,872,762

FORMING AND FILLING PACKAGES AND APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed Sept. 27, 1956 INVEN OR fac/f' firee em ATTORNEY United States Patent FORMING A'ND FELING PACKAGES AND APPARATUS THEREFOR Jack Dreeben, Philadelphia, Pa.

Application September 27, 1956, Serial No. 612,557

8 Claims. (Cl. 53-28) This invention relates to forming and filling packages and apparatus therefor.

It has heretofore been proposed to draw transparent synthetic plastic sheet material from a web roll, form the web about a tube into a bag or envelope and apply a longitudinal seal along the web, fill the bag or envelope through the tube, seal the top of one package with simultaneous sealing of the bottom of the succeeding package, and sever the seal intermediate its top and bottom edges to separate the packages, this all being effected in a timed sequence.

The materials heretofore employed have been of the non-elongatable type, such as regenerated cellulose in sheet form, available as cellophane, and also of the highly elongatable type, such as polyethylene.

The forming tubes heretofore available were suitable for forming packages Where loose fill of the package was permissible but were not satisfactory where a tight fill or minimum of clearance between the article and the bag or envelope was desired.

It has heretofore been considered essential to support the material of which the package was made by an abutment, usually in the form of a filling tube, towards which the longitudinal heat sealer was advanced to provide the longitudinal seal at the overlapped edges of the web.

It is the principal object of the present invention to elfect the filling of the package with a minimum of clearance between the contents and the side wall of the package.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved character of web forming device for package making and with which a Wide range of transverse package shapes can be formed with the side wall of the package conforming to the shape of the article or contents packaged.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved character of web forming device with which a minimum clearance between the contents and the side wall of the package can be attained with single or solid articles. 7

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a simple but effective attachment for package forming machines by which sheet material from the web roll can be formed into a tube for longitudinal sealing and other operations where a tight fill of the packageis required.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide, for package forming and filling machines, a simple but effective forming and filling device with which a package conforming closely to the shape of an article therein can be made.

Other objects and advantageous features of the invention will be apparent from the description and claims.

The nature and characteristic features of the invention will be more readily understood from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming part thereof, in which:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of apparatus for forming and filling packages illustrative of the invention;

ice

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of one form of package forming and filling shoe in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view of the shoe shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a top plan View of another form of package forming and filling shoe in accordance with the invention; and

Fig. 5 is a side elevational view of the shoe shown in Fig. 4.

It should, of course, be understood that the description and drawings herein are illustrative merely, and that various modifications and changes can be made in the structure disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Like numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views.

It has heretofore been proposed to provide package making machines which include a Web roll 10 as shown in Fig. 1 having thereon a supply of sheet material to be made into a succession of longitudinally sealed tubular packages with transverse seals at each end.

The prior package making machines also included a forming shoe 11 to which the sheet material was advanced from the supply on the web roll 10, the advancing being effected by a pair of horizontally separable gripping jaws 12 in engagement with the tubular web. The gripping jaws 12, customarily provided with heat sealing portions 13 were reciprocated in a vertical path by their supports 14, the length of the stroke determining the length of the package. The supports 14 were separated at the bottom of the stroke and moved upwardly in open position, then closed at the top of their stroke to bring the heat sealing portions 13 of the jaws 12 into gripping relation to the tubular conformation of the sheet material provided by the forming shoe 11. I

Either during a period of rest or during the downward movement of the web of sheet material a longitudinal seal was provided by a longitudinal heat sealer 15 and the articles were delivered into the tubular formed web through 'a filling tube interiorly disposed in spaced relation to the forming shoe 11.

During the downward movement of the jaws 12, also, a transverse seal was applied to the tubular sheet material which was severed intermediate the top and bottom margins of the transveresly sealed area so that the transverse sealprovided a sealed transverse top margin of the filled package and a sealed transverse bottom margin of the package to be filled. Repetition of the operations just referred to provided a succession offilled, sealed and separated packages.

It was heretofore considered essential to employ a filling tube which extended below the shoe and provided an abutment for the longitudinal heat sealer. Such tubes and the shoes used therewith were customarily circular in cross section. The thickness of the tube prevented complete filling of and elimination of the space between the article and the inner face of the side .wall of the package.

In accordance with the present invention the hollow circular filling tube formerly employed is discarded and a web tube forming shoe having'different major and minor axial distances in horizontal cross section is employed,

as hereinafter explained.

-For packages of highly elongatable material, -web feeding or slack control mechanism interposed between the web roll 10 and the shoe 11 can'be employed, as"

shown in my prior application for patent filed July 20, 1956, Serial No. 599,204, which isnow abandoned. 1.

Referring now to Figs. 2 and 3, a shoe 111 is'there shown which is particularly suited for the making of packages of the character referred to and wherein the article has a minimum clearance-or substantially no Patented Feb. 10, was

clearance with respect to the inner face of the tubular Web.

The shoe 111 has a lower solid mounting ring section 16 and an upper section 17. The shoe 111 is shown ashaving both the lower section 1e and the" upper section 17 elliptical in horizontal cross section, and having major and minor axes of the proper length to accommodate the article to be packaged. Merely by way'of illustrationit can be noted that the shoe 111 is suitable for use in packaging individual loaves of bread of elliptical, oval or similar cross section.

The lower section 16hr the shoe 111 has amounting bracket arm 18 connected thereto and extending there from. for supporting the shoe 111 in the'machin'e';

The upper section 17" is-secured toand carried by the lower section 16" and has overlapping end portions 19 and 20 free frorndirect attachment to the lower-section 16 and in spaced relation to provide clearance for the web;

The top margin of the upper section 17 has an elevated part 21-. with downwardly sloping parts 22 on each side andoverlapping end parts 23. As shown, the difference in elevation between the highest part of the top margin of the upper section 17 and the intersection of the overlapped parts of the top margin is suitable for the nonelongatable materials although, if desired, the top margin can have parts with differences in elevation to accommodate highly elongatable' materials, as shown in my prior. application filed August 1', 1956, Serial No. 601,529, which is now Patent No. 2,840,966,

Referring now to Figs; 4 and 5, a shoe 211 is there shown which is also suited for'the making of packages wherein the article has a minimum clearance or substantially no clearance with respect to the inner face of the tubular'web.

The shoe 211 has a lower solid mounting ring section 1-16 and an upper section 1 17. The shoe 211 is shown as fi'attened with straight flat sides and semhci'rcular ends;

and having major and minor axes of the proper length toaccommodate the article to be packaged. Merely by way of illustration it can be noted that the shoe 211 is suitable for use in packaging individual folded handkerchiefs, sponges, soap, and the like, of comparable cross' section. The term article as used herein has reference to one or more items which when enclosed by I the web do not have any marked tendency to disperse, and which inherently provide some measure of rigidity.

The lower section 116 of the shoe 211 has a mounting bracket arm 118 connected thereto and extending'the'refrom for supporting" the shoe 211 in the machine.

The shoe 211 has overlapping end. portions 19 and 20, as' before, and marginal portions' 21, 22 and 23, as previously ex lained.

In use, a web of sheet material to be formed into a tube. for package making is delivered in flat condition from the web roll' Ill'and is delivered over the top marginal edge of the shoe III or 211 and then downwardly in the interior thereof with one marginal edge of the web being guided'b'y the end 19' and the other by the end 201mb crossed"andoverlappedrelation and'so as' to be straight in their overlapped downward movement. The web edges thus maintain themselves. in their proper positionv for longitudihall sealing.

Thearticleto' be packaged is introducedinto the shoe 111 or'211' during the downward movement of the jaws 12.

The hollow tubular web as thus formed and with the article thereinandprior to the completion of the downward strokeis ready forlon'gitudinal'sealing by the heat'sealerils, the1article'= and the tension imparted by the jaws 12: to the web providing" a sutficient support or:

abutment for. the pressing-iaction of the heat seale'r againsttheoverlappedmargins. The heat sealer 15' is ofsufiicient length-to provide a longitudinal seal which is longer thanthearticle'andithecompleted package sothat there is no unsealed longitudinal margin. The hollow tubular web can also have transverse seals simu1= taneously applied thereto by the heat sealing portions 13 of the jaws 12. i

The tubular web will conform to the transverse external shape of the article so that rectangular, square, elliptical, oval, or other shapes of packages can be made which differ from the interior shape of the shoe 111 or 211,. and with the article having a tight fit with respect to the inner face of the web in the finished package. None of the interior area of the package is required to be occupied during filling by anything other than the article itself.

I claim:

1. The method of making packages from a continuous web of sheet material which comprises advancing the sheet material and forming the same under tension into a vertical tube with the longitudinal edges in overlapped relation and with the tube having a lower transverse" seal, inserting an article into the tube in'close' engagement with the inner face of the tube and supported by the transverse seal and the tension of the tube, and vertically longitudinally heat sealingv said edges together with the article providing an interior support for the longitudinal sealing, the portion of the tube at which thesealing of the edges is efiected being free from sidewis'e restraint other thanthat of its own tension.

2. The'rnethod of making packages from a continuous web of sheet material which comprises advancing" the sheet material over an internally unobstructed tube former and forming the web under tension into a vertical tube with the longitudinal edges in overlapped relation and with the tube' having a lower transverse seal, inserting a solid article through the former into the tube in'close engagement withthe inner faced the tube and supported by the transverse seal and the tension of the tube, and vertically longitudinally heat sealing'said edges together with the article providing" an interior support for the longitudinal sealing, the portion of the tube at which the sealing of the edges is effected being free from sidewise restraint other than that of its own tension.

3. The method of making packages from a continuous web of sheet material which comprises sequentially advancing the sheet material over an internally unobstructed tube former and forming the web under tension into a vertical tube with the longitudinal edges in overlapped relation and with the bottom closed by a transverse seal, inserting an article through the former into the tube in close engagement with the inner face under tension into a vertical tube with the longitudinal edges in overlapped relation and with the bottom closed by a transverse seal, inserting an article through the former into the-tube in close engagement with the inner faceof the tube andsupported by the closed bottom and the tension of the tube, and vertically longitudinally heat sealing said edges together with the article provid ing an interior support for the longitudinalsealing, the portion of the tube at which the sealing of the edge is efieetedbeing' free from sidewisc restraint other than that of its own tension.

5. Iii-apparatus for the continuous packaging of' articles from a web of sheet material, an upright forming and article introducing shoe having spaced I overlappin g end portions'forformin'g the Web into a vertical tube with overlapped edges, members movable below said shoe for advancing said tube downwardly of said shoe under tension and for transversely sealing said tube, and said shoe being non-circular in transverse cross section, and a longitudinal heat sealing member engaging said tube below said shoe for longitudinally sealing said tube, said movable members and said tube providing a support for said article, said shoe and said movable members retaining said tube under tension at the locations of engagement of said longitudinal heat sealing member, said article providing an internal abutment for the tube for the longitudinal sealing thereof, and the tension of tube and the article providing the sole restraint of said tube against sidewise movement during engagement of said longitudinal heat sealing member.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 5 in which said shoe is free from internal obstructions.

7. In apparatus for the continuous packaging of articles from a web of sheet material, an upright forming and article introducing shoe having spaced overlapping end portions for forming the web into a vertical tube with overlapped edges, members movable below said shoe for advancing the tube downwardly of said shoe under tension and for transversely sealing said tube, said shoe being elliptical in transverse cross section, and a longitudinal heat sealing member engaging said tube below said shoe for longitudinally sealing said tube, said movable members providing a support for said article, said shoe and said movable members retaining said tube under tension at the locations of engagement of said longitudinal heat sealing member, said article providing an internal abutment for the tube, and the tension of said tube and the article providing the sole restraint of said tube against sidewise movement during engagement of said longitudinal heat sealing member.

8. In apparatus for the continuous packaging of articles from a web of sheet material, an upright forming and article introducing shoe having spaced overlapping end portions for forming the web into a vertical tube with overlapped edges, members movable below said shoe for advancing said tube downwardly and transversely sealing said tube, said shoe being oval in transverse cross section, and a longitudinal heat sealing member engaging said tube below said shoe for longitudinally sealing said tube, said movable members providing a support for said article, said shoe and said movable members retaining said tube under tension at the locations of engagement of said longitudinal heat sealing member, said article providing an internal abutment for the tube for the longitudinal sealing thereof, and the tension of the tube and the article providing the sole restraint of said tube against sidewise movement during engagement of said longitudinal heat sealing member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 495,426 Murch Apr. 11, 1893 565,479 Maclay Aug. 11, 1896 1,986,422 Zwoyer Jan. 1, 1935 2,037,139 Milmoe Apr. l4, 1936 2,162,230 Salfisberg June 13, 1939 2,200,971 Sonneborn May 14, 1940 2,385,897 Waters Oct. 2, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US495426 *Apr 11, 1893Robert DCan-body-making machine
US565479 *Apr 23, 1896Aug 11, 1896 Package-wrapping machine
US1986422 *Nov 28, 1933Jan 1, 1935Transparent Wrap Machine CorpAutomatic packaging machine
US2037139 *Sep 12, 1929Apr 14, 1936Redington Co F BBottle wrapping machine
US2162230 *Feb 5, 1938Jun 13, 1939Ivers Lee CoAlignment controlled packaging machine
US2200971 *Mar 4, 1939May 14, 1940Stokes & Smith CoSystem for making, filling, and sealing containers
US2385897 *Sep 4, 1942Oct 2, 1945Harry F WatersContinuous filling and packaging machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3067555 *Sep 12, 1960Dec 11, 1962Package Machinery CoMounting means for wrapper forming instrumentalities
US3221474 *Oct 23, 1961Dec 7, 1965Int Paper CanadaAutomatic packaging machine
US3370517 *Jun 21, 1965Feb 27, 1968Dow Chemical CoApparatus for forming tubular film
US5505037 *Dec 14, 1994Apr 9, 1996Pacmac, Inc.Vertical form, fill and seal machine for making recloseable bags
US5746043 *Feb 21, 1996May 5, 1998Pacmac, Inc.Convertible form, fill and seal packaging machine and method
US5768852 *Apr 4, 1996Jun 23, 1998Pacmac, Inc.Vertical form, fill and seal machine, components and method for making reclosable bags
US5930983 *Mar 4, 1997Aug 3, 1999Pacmac, Inc.Form, fill and seal packaging machine with bag squeezer and method
US6029428 *Dec 22, 1997Feb 29, 2000Pacmac, Inc.Convertible form, fill and seal packaging machine
US6047521 *Jun 22, 1998Apr 11, 2000Pacmac, Inc.Vertical form, fill and seal machine for making reclosable bags
US6553744Aug 21, 2000Apr 29, 2003Pacmac, Inc.Packaging machine
US6718739 *Apr 5, 2002Apr 13, 2004Frito-Lay North America, Inc.Tube pack bag making
US7409810 *Oct 2, 2006Aug 12, 2008Cmd CorporationVertical pouch making machine and method of making pouches
US7757460Aug 8, 2008Jul 20, 2010Cmd CorporationVertical pouch making machine and method of making pouches
WO2003086869A1 *Mar 13, 2003Oct 23, 2003Jay E GehringTube pack bag making
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/451, 493/248, 53/551, 493/302
International ClassificationB65B9/10, B65B9/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65B9/22
European ClassificationB65B9/22