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Publication numberUS2872817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1959
Filing dateJun 1, 1956
Priority dateJun 1, 1956
Also published asDE1128185B
Publication numberUS 2872817 A, US 2872817A, US-A-2872817, US2872817 A, US2872817A
InventorsPitts William A
Original AssigneeJersey Prod Res Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid sampler
US 2872817 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W'. A. PITTs FLUID SAMPLER Feb. -l0, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June l, 1956 H w A G m m ,5* v Z 2 '37, v54l INVENTOR.

W|H|amA.P|Hs, i BY yFIG.2.

ATTORNEY- Feb. l0, 1959 W.-A. PlTTs 2,872,817

FLUID SAMPLER Filed June l, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 SAMPLE TUBE HOUSING JUST AFTER DISCHARGE FILLING SAMPLE CATCHER FIG. 6.

AIR SUPPLY FIG] DISCHARGING SAMPLE TUBE INVENTOR.

William A. Pitts,

BY I

ATTORNEY.

United States Patent Ou FLUID SAMPLER William A. Pitts, Bellaire, Tex., assigner, by mesne assignments, to Jersey Production Research Company, Tulsa, lrla., a corporation of Delaware Application June 1, 1956, Serial No. 588,687

11 Claims. (Cl. 73-422) This invention is directed to a device for taking uid samples. More specifically, it is directed to a device for taking samples of fluid owing in a pipe or retained in a vessel.

This invention is also directed to a fluid sampling device adaptable for use in a fluid meter.

An object of this invention is take samples of uid ilo-wing in a conduit or retained in a vessel without atleeting the pressure of the system, the flow of the iluid or risking contamination or escape of the fluid.

The usual procedure in sampling fluids is to tap the vessel containing the uids and draw off a desired sample. However, this method is disadvantageous since when the tluid is a mixture of several tluids which will separate and settle out, it is difficult to determine where to tap the vessel in order to obtain a representative, proportional sample. Generally, it is necessary to tap at several representative locations. However, even then the quantity taken by each tap influences the percentage make-up of the composite sample.

This invention overcomes the difficulty in obtaining representative samples by having the sampler member traverse completely the vessel. Briefly, this invention provides an improved sampler for sampling fluids in a receptacle and comprises a body member mounted on the receptacle provided with a valve chamber and rst and second passageways. A valve member having first and second positions is slidably arranged in the valve chamber. Biasing means is arranged in the chamber adapted to urge the valve member to a first position. A piston housing is mounted on the receptacle provided with spaced apart ports each tluidly communicating the interior and exterior of the housing. A shaft is arranged in the housing having a third passageway therein and an open-ended sample tube having rst and second positions is slidably arranged on the shaft and is provided with first and second passageways. A piston head is connected to the tube and movable therewith between the spaced apart ports, the tube being provided with ports and a shoulder adjacent one end thereof. A movable plug member is arranged in the tube, and the tube engagedly connects with the valve member to move the valve member to a second position when the tube moves to its second position. The iirst passageway fluidly communicates the tube ports with the exterior of the body when the tube is in the second position; the second passageway luidly communicates the interior of the receptacle and the valve chamber; and the third passageway tluidly communicates the interior of theV tube, the exterior of the housing and the interior of the housing when the tube is in the second position and fluid pressure means are provided operative Vin the housing adapted to reciprocate the tube.

The invention also contemplates use of the sampler in conjunction with an automatic metering system wherein a sample of uid is removed from the receptacle in each metering cycle. Herein a metering tank is provided with 2,872,817 Patented Feb. lG, 1959 ice first valve means for controlled admission and discharge of fluid to and from the tank. A chamber is mounted on the tank. Second valve means is positioned between the chamber and the tank and is adapted to selectively permit and prevent tluid flow therebetween. A first control means is connected to the chamber operatively responsive to the iluid Ilevel in the chamber and a second control means uidly communicating with rst valve means is operatively responsive to liquid discharge from the tank. A housing is mounted on the tank provided with tubular piston means slidably arranged therein and extensive through the tank and is adapted to remove a iluid sample from the tank. A plug member is arranged in the piston member for forcing the fluid sample from the piston member. A body member is mounted on the tank and is provided with a passageway lluidly communicating the interior and exterior of the body member. Third valve means is arranged in the body member adapted to tluidly communicate the interior of the piston means and the passageway when the piston means extends through the tank. A signal transmission means operatively connecting the first and second control means with the rst and second valve means and the housing is provided. The rst and second -control means cooperate with the signal transmission means for actuating the first valve means for admitting fluid to the tank and for opening the second valve means and for actuating the piston means to retract the piston means and plug member from the tank and for actuating the rst valve means for discharging fluid from the tank and for closing the second valve means and for actuating the piston means to move the piston means through the tank and for actuating the plug mmber to move the plug member through the piston means.

Referring to the drawings,

Fig. l is a cross-sectional view of the sampler connected to a fluid-containing rceptacle or conduit.

. Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional of the sampler positioned in a sample taking position.

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a modification of the sampler.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of another modification.

Figs. 5, 6 and 7 are schematic showings of the sampler connected in a metering tank for automatic sampling operations.

Referring more particularly to the drawings wherein identical numerals designate identical parts.

Figs, l and 2 show a housing l@ screw threadedly connected to a receptacle 11. The housing lil is provided with ports 12 and It to which are connected conduits 14 and 15, respectively. A shart 16 is arranged in housing 10. The shaft 16 is provided with an upper closure member 17 that closes the upper end of housing 1t) and a shoulder 1S adjacent the upper end of shaft 16. The shaft i6 may be made integral with housing 10 or may be connected thereto by any desired means. A passageway 8 extends longitudinally through shaft i6 and closure member 17. A pressure relief valve 9 is arranged on the upper end of passageway 8. A laterally extending passageway 19 is formed in shaft i6 adjacent the lower end thereof and fluidly communicates passageway 8 and the interior of housing iti. An open-ended sample tube 2li is slidably arranged on shaft 16 and is provided with a piston head 2l and a shoulder 53 at its upper end, ports 22 adjacent its lower end and an internal shoulder 23 positioned below ports 22. Also, the lower inner end of tube 20 is beveled upwardly and inwardly as at 24. The stationary shaft i6 is provided with sealing means 25 and the tubular member is provided with sealing means 26 adjacent the wall of housing 10 and sealing means 27 adjacent the wall of the shaft 16. The housing 10 is also provided with a lower wall 51 and a sealing means 28 adjacent its lower end. These sealing member may suitably be -rings. A plug or piston member 2-9 is positioned in the interior of the sampling tube 2G above shoulder 23.

Aligned with housing on the opposite side of the co-ntainer 11 is a body member 3d screw threadedly connected thereto. Body member 3G is provided with a shoulder 54 and chamber 31 which is open to the interior of container 11. A passageway 32 iluidly communicates the interior of the container 11 and the lower end of the chamber 31. A cup-shaped valve member 33 is positioned in chamber 31. The upper end of valve member 33 is cut away to provide a beveled seat 34 for engagement with the beveled portion 24 of the lower end of sample tube 20. A spring 35 is arranged in chamber 31 normally biasing the valve member 33 to close the opening in body 3i? to container 11. A second passageway 36 is provided in body 30 and extends from chamber 31 to the exterior of the body 30. The passageway 36 is provided with an enlarged portion 37 in which is positioned a check valve which includes ball or sphere 39 biased upwardly by spring 33 normally to close off lluid llow through passageway 36 from the exterior of body 30. Chamber 31 is provided with a shoulder 46 which provides a stop for the lateral extensions 41 of valve 33 to limit the upward movement of valve 33. A plurality of seals 42, which may suitably be O-rings, may be arranged on body 3() adjacent valve member 33 to prevent the passage of iluids between Valve 33 and the inner walls of body 30.

Fig. 2 illustrates the position of the tubular sample member 20 in its extended position. The piston or plug member 29 is shown in its lowermost position wherein the lluid previously accumulated in tube 20 has been discharged.

The modification of Fig. 3 provides a spring member S0 surrounding sample tube 20 in housing 10. In this instance one end of spring 5) engages with the lower wall 51 of housing 16 and the upper end of spring 50 engages with a shoulder 52 formed on piston head 21. Spring member 50 exerts an upward bias on tube 20. With this modification it is unnecessary to provide the conduit shown in Figs. l and 2.

The modication of Fig. 4 provides a sealing means 55 on the interior of sampler tube 20 between the ports Z2 and the beveled seat 24. This modication may be employed in the embodiments of Figs. l and 2 or Fig. 3.

To obtain a true proportion of the amounts of the ilm'ds sampled, when a mixture of several iluids which tend to settle and separate is to be sampled, it is preferred that the cross section of the receptacle traversed by the sample tube be of such shape and position that the volume percentages of the fluids obtained in the sample tube be exactly representative of the volume percentages of the tluids contained in the receptacle or ilowing through the cross section of the receptacle at the time the sample tube traverses the receptacle.

An example of such an arrangement would be a horizontally extending conduit having a square or rectangular cross section, two sides of which would be in horizontally extending planes. In this example the sample tube would operate in a vertical path between the two horizontally extending sides.

In operation when it is desired to take a sample of iluid either contained in or llowing through receptacle 11, fluid pressure form any desired source, such as an air supply, is transmitted through conduit 14, port 12 and into the interior of housing 1). This fluid pressure moves sample tube downwardly to engage with valve member 33. In the course of the traverse of tube 2t) through receptacle 11 the duid contained therein enters the lower open end of tube 2li, thus filling the tube. As more clearly seen in Fig. 2, tubular sampler 20 continues to move downwardly by the action of fluid pressure from conduit 14 acting on piston head 18 until the beveled seating surface 24 on tubular member 2t) seats on beveled seat 34 of valve member 33 then trapping a representative sample in tube 20. Further downward movement of tube 20 causes valve 33 to move downwardly until the ports 22 are aligned with passages 36 in body 30. At this point the tubular sampler is prevented from further downward movement by the shoulder 53 adjacent the piston head 1S engaging the lower wall 51 of housing 10 and also by lateral extension d1 of valve member 33 engaging with the shoulder 54 formed in chamber 31. When the piston has reached its lowermost postion and ports 22 are aligned with passages 36, passages 19 in shaft 16 lluidly communicate the interior of the sample tube with the interior of housing 19. `lust prior to alignment of ports 22 with passage 36, plug 29 is in the upper portion of tube 20 as shown by the dotted line in Fig. 2. The fluid pressure imposed through conduit 14 employed to maintain the sampler tube in its lowermost position then also passes through passageway 19 to act on piston or plug 29 and force the plug downwardly. This movement of the plug downwardly forces the iluid sample previously drawn into the sample tube downwardly through ports 22, passage 36, past ball 39, through enlarged portion 37 and conduit 37 to a sample receiving vessel not shown. The passageway 32 Iluidly communicating the interior of the receptacle 11 and chamber 31 is utilized to equalize the pressures on both sides of valve member 33. This prevents pressure in receptacle 11 from moving valve member 33 downwardly and having luids in receptacle 11 directly enter passageway 36.

After the sample has been taken, the sample tube 20 is retracted by connecting conduit 15 to a source of fluid pressure and having the iluid pressure pass through conduit 15, port 13 and into the interior of housing 10. The luid pressure then acts on the under side of piston 18, thereby moving the sample tube upwardly into its original position as shown in Fig. l. Retraction of the sample tube 20 permits the valve member 33 to resume its original position, as seen in Fig. 1, under the bias of spring 35. The fluid pressure contained in housing 10 above piston head 18 is exhausted through conduit 14. Conversely, when moving downwardly, the iluid pressure contained in housing 10 below piston head 18 is exhausted through conduit 15. Pressure relief valve 9 is set to open at a pressure in excess of that necessary to move tube 2t) and plug 29 downwardly. Upon retraction of tube 2t), however, tube 20 closes oil passageway 19, thereby entrapping fluid in tube 20. Excess iluid pressure escapes through passageway 3 and check valve 9 to the atmosphere.

The embodiment of Fig. 3 is similar in all respects to the embodiment shown and described for Figs. l and 2 except the means for retracting sample tube 2G has been changed from fluid pressure means, as shown in Figs. l and 2, to a spring biasing member 50. Accordingly, port 13 is utilized to exhaust the fluid pressure contained in sample tube 20. That is, the fluid pressure upon retraction is forced upwardly by the plug 29 through passage 19 and out port 13. Hence, in operation, as in the previous embodiment, lluid pressure is applied through conduit 14 and port 12 to the upper end of piston head 18, thereby moving sample tube 20 downwardly against the bias of spring 50. Since passage 19 is closed off until piston head 18 is positioned below the opening of passage 19 to housing 10, the luid contained in housing 10 is exhausted through port 13 as the sample tube 20 moves downwardly. On reaching the lowermast position whereby ports 22 and passage 36 are aligned or in tluid communication, passageway 19 is in fluid communication with the interior of housing 10. Fluid pressure then acts through passage 19 to move plug 29 downwardly thereby forcing the sample fluids contained in sample tube 20 downwardly and out through ports 22 and passageway 36 and check valve 37 through 39. Upon the release and exhaust of pressure in conduit 14, not shown, spring 50 moves sample tube 20 back to its original position exhausting the uids in housing above piston 18 out through port 12 and conduit 14.

The Fig. 4 embodiment provides a sealing means 55 on the interior of sample tube 20 between the seating surface 24 and the stop shoulder 23. This sealing means is provided to insure that the fluid pressure exhausted from sample tube through port 22 and passage 36 does not flow to the engaged seating surfaces 24 and 34 to force or tend to force sample tube 20 upwardly. This is a protective measure, since Huid pressure acting upwardly on surface 24 may cause sample tube 20 to move upwardly, which would, of course, close oft the fluid communication between port 22 and exhaust passageway 36.

Figs. 5, 6 and 7 disclose the sampling device in conjunction with an automatic liquid metering system. The sampling device illustrated in Figs. 5 through 7 is the embodiment disclosed in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 5 shows the system just after the tank has discharged. Fig. 6 shows the system when the tank is tilling, and Fig. 7 shows the system when the tank is discharging. In the metering of fluids in many instances, it is desirable that a sample of the fluids contained in the tank be taken at each metering cycle. The sampling device of this invention is readily adaptable to such operation in an automatic metering system.

Referring specifically to Figs. 5 through 7, Fig. 5 shows a metering tank 60 on top of which is mounted a tank or chamber 61. The tanks 60 and 61 are connected by means of a conduit 62 in which is positioned a diaphragm valve 63 which selectively opens and closes conduit 62. A filling conduit 64 connects into tank 60 from a source of liquid to be metered, such as production oil, not shown. A diaphragm 3-way valve 65 interconnects a conduit 66 and a discharge conduit 67 and filling conduit 64. This valve is adapted to tluidly communicate conduits 64 and 66 when in one position and to fluidily communicate conduits 66 and 67 when in another position. Pressure equalizing conduits 68 and 69 may be connected to the upper ends of tanks 60 and 61, respectively. Conduits 68 and 69 may be interconnected as at 70.

A oat 71 is positioned in tank 61 and connects to a liquid level control valve means 72 by means of pivotal rod 73. Discharge conduit 67 connects into a chamber 74 to which is connected a liquid level control chamber 75 by means of upper and lower conduits '/6 and 77. A float 78 is positioned in chamber 75 and is connected to control valve means 79 by means of a pivotal rod 80. A conduit 81 connects into the lower end of chamber 74 for discharging liquid to storage or any other desired place.

The system for automatic operation of the meter comprises a series of conduits, valves and valve controls, whereby valves 6 3 and 65 are actuated simultaneously to permit liuid flow through conduit 62 and to permit fluid flow through conduits 64 and 66 and to close oii huid ilow through conduits 66 and 67, respectively. Contrariwise, the system affords simultaneous actuation of valves 63 and 65 to close off iluid flow through conduit 62 and conduits 66 and 64 and to open fluid communication between conduits 66 and 67, respectively. Actuation of the valves is controlled by the position of the control valve means 72 and 79 which are in turn controlled by the positions of lloats 71 and 78, respectively. A conduit 90 connects valve 79 with a source of lluid pilot pressure 91. A conduit 92 connects valve means 79 with the diaphragm 93 of valve 65 and diaphragm 94 ot' valve 63 by means of conduits 95, 96 and 97. A conduit 98 connects fluid supply 91 to valve means 72. A conduit 99 connects valve means 72 with diaphragms 93 and 94 by means of conduits 95, 96 and 97. A double check valve 100 is positioned at the juncture of conduits 95, 99 and 92. A diaphragm type valve 101 is positioned in conduit 92 to iluidly communicate valve means 79 and double check valve 100 when in one position and to prevent uid communication therebetween and exhaust conduit 92 between check valve 100 and valve 101 when in another position (Fig. 6). A conduit 102 connects conduit 99 with the diaphragm 102 of valve 101. An orifice 103 and volume chamber 104 are positioned in conduit 102 for suitable time delaying action.

Speed control valves 96' and 97 may be provided in conduits 96 and 97, respectively, to insure that valve 63 closes completely before lvalve 65 iluidly communicates conduits 66 and 67 and to insure that valve 65 closes oft iluid communication between conduits 66 and 67 before valve 63 opens.

The sampling device is shown positioned on tank 60. A 4-way diaphragm valve 105 connects with conduits 14 and 15 of the sampling device. A conduit 106 connects conduit 99 with the diaphragm 107 of valve 105. A conduit 108 connects conduit 98 with valve 105. An exhaust conduit 109 also connects into valve 105.

v In operation, assuming that tank 60 has just discharged liquid through chamber 74, the discharge of liquid `from chamber 75 causes float 78 to drop to a low position which permits lluid pressure from the supply 91 to pass through conduit 90, valve means 79 and into conduit 92. At this time valve 101 is open, permitting the fluid pressure signal to pass to double check valve 100 which moves the valve element contained therein to the upper position, as shown in Fig. 5, and uid pressure passes through conduits 95, 96 and 97 to actuate diaphragms 93 and 94.

The pressure signal going to the diaphragm 94 of valve 63 through conduit 96 is delayed by means of speed control valve 96 until after the pressure signal passing through conduit 97 going to diaphragm 93 of valve 65 has actuated valve 65' to iluidly communicate conduits 66 and 64 and to close off fluid communication between conduits 67 and 66. Thus, tluid ow from tank 60 is completely closed off before valve 63 opens, thereby insuring that no part of the iluid in tank 61 escapes through 67 to cause a false measurement. Likewise, speed control valve 97 restricts passage of the exhaust signal from diaphragm 93, thereby insuring that valve 65 maintains closed ot fluid communication between conduits 66 and 67 until after valve 63 closes.

Fluid pressure on diaphragm 93 actuates valve 65 which permits liquid to tiow from fill conduit 64 through conduit 66 into tank 60 and closes oit iluid communication between conduits 66 and 67. Fluid pressure on diaphragm 9d opens valve 63 causing liquid contained in tank 61 to enter tank 60, thereby causing float 71 to assume a low position which actuates valve means 72. Upon the latter occurrence, fluid pressure from source 91 passes through conduit 98 through valve means 72 and into conduit 99, as more clearly illustrated in Fig. 6. The tluid pressure in conduit 99 passes into and through double check valve 100 into conduits 9S, 96 and 97 to maintain valves 63 and 65 in the same position initiated by the iluid pressure signal coming through conduit 92. At the same time, the pressure signal in conduit 99 also passes through conduit 102 and applies pressure on diaphragm 102' of valve 101, thereby closing oit lluid llow through conduit 92 and bleeding conduit 92 between check valve 100 and valve 101.

Valves 65 and 63 are maintained in their respective positions until liquid rises inv chamber 61. This moves lioat 71 to a raised position which actuates valve means 72 which closes oit the fluid pressure in conduit 98 at valve means 72 and bleeds conduit 99 through exhaust conduit 99. The orice 103 and chamber 104postioned in conduit 102 are employed to delay opening of valve 101 until the bleed signal in conduit 92 takes over actuation of the valves 63 and 65 after discharge begins. Exhausting or bleeding conduits 95, 96 and 97 and conduit 102 reverses valves 63, 65 and 101, thus closing valve 63, liuidly communicating conduits 66 and 67, closing off fluid communication between conduits 64 and 66, and fluid communicating double check valve 100 and valve means 79. When valve 65 opens fluid communication between conduits 66 andk 67, liquid enters chamber 74 through 67 and chamber 75 through conduits 76 and 77 and the raised liquid level in chamber 75 moves float 78 to a raised position, thereby closing olf fluid supply in conduit 90 at valve means 79 and exhausting of bleeding conduit 92 through exhaust conduit 92'. Thus, a cycle of operation has been completed.

The fluid sampler works in conjunction with this systern in this manner. Upon actuation of float 72 to a raised position, that is, just as the filling step is completed and the discharging step is to begin as seen in Fig. 7, valve means 72 bleeds or exhausts conduit 99 through exhaust 99. This in turn exhausts or bleeds conduit 166 which releases pressure on diaphragm 107. This release of pressure actuates valve 105 to fluidly communicate conduits 103 and 14, thereby moving the sample tube downwardly through tank 60 to engage valve 33 and communicate port 22 and discharge passageway 36 as described supra. The sample taken discharges through conduit 37 to any suitable receptacle 111. The sample tube 20 is maintained in this position until the liquid has discharged completely from tank 60 at which time float 78 drops to a low position which causes actuation of valves 63 and 65y which in turn causes float 71 to drop to a low position which actuates valve means '72, thereby causing liuid pressure to enter conduit 99 from conduit 98 which in turn applies fluid pressure to diaphragm 107 through conduit 106. This application of pressure aetuates valve 105 to lluidly communicate conduits 108 and 15 which retracts the sample tube 20 and exhausts the fluid above piston 18 in housing 10 through conduit 14 to the exhaust conduit 109.

As seen, therefore, the fluid sampler is readily adaptable to any desired automatic tank metering system.

Having fully described the nature, objects and operation of my invention, I claim:

l. A device for sampling fluids in a receptacle comprising a body member mounted on said receptacle provided with a valve chamber and first and second passageways, a valve member slidably arranged in said chamber having first and second positions, biasing means arranged in said chamber adapted to urge said valve member to said first position, a piston housing mounted on said receptacle provided with spaced apart ports each lluidly communicating the interior and exterior of said housing, a shaft arranged in said housing having a third passageway therein, an open-ended sample tube slidably arranged on said shaft having first and second positions, a piston head connected to said tube movable therewith between said spaced apart ports, said tube being provided with ports and a shoulder adjacent one end thereof, a plug member movable in said tubing, said tube engagedly connecting with said valve member to move said valve member to said second position when said tube moves to said second position, said first passageway fluidly communicating said tube ports with the exterior of said body when said tube is in said second position, said second passageway fluidly communicating the interior of said receptacle and said valve chamber, said third passageway fluidly communicating the interior of said tube and the interior of said housing when said tube is in Said second position and liuid pressure means operative in said housing adapted to move said piston.

2. A device as recited in claim l wherein said valve member is provided with a tube engaging seating surface and said tube is provided with sealing means between said one open end thereof and said tube ports adapted to seal off uid flow from said tube to said seating surface when said tube is engaged thereon.

3. A device for sampling liuids in a receptacle comprising a body member mounted on said receptacle provided with a valve chamber and first and second passageways, a valve member slidably arranged in said chamber having first and second positions, biasing means arranged in said chamber adapted to urge said valve member to said first position, a housing mounted on said receptacle provided with spaced apart ports each fiuidly communicating the interior and exterior of said housing, a shaft arranged in said housing having a third passageway therein, an open-ended sample tube slidably arranged on. said shaft having first and second positions, a piston head connected to said tube movable in said housing between said spaced apart ports, said tube being provided with ports and a shoulder adjacent one end thereof, a plug member movable in said tube, said tube engagedly connecting with said Valve member to move said valve member to said second position when said tube moves to said second position, said first passageway fluidly communicating said tube ports and the exterior of said body when said tube is in said second position, said second passageway tiuidly communicating the interior of said receptacle and said valve chamber, said third passageway fluidly communicating the interior of said tube, the exterior of said housing, and the interior 4of said housing when said tube is in said second position, a check valve normally closing off fluid communication between said third passageway and the exterior of said housing, and fluid pressure means connected to said housing adapted to move said piston.

4. A device as recited in claim 3 wherein said valve member is provided with a tube engaging seating surface and said tube is provided with sealing means between said one open end thereof and said tube ports adapted to seal off fluid flow from said tube to said seating surface when said tube is engaged thereon.

5. A device for sampling fluids in a receptacle comprising a body member mounted on said receptacle provided with a valve chamber and first and second passageways, a valve member slidably arranged in said chamber having first and second positions, first biasing means arranged in said chamber adapted to urge said valve member to said first position, a piston housing mounted on said receptacle provided with spaced apart ports each lluidly communicating the interior and exterior of said housing, a shaft arranged in said housing having a third passageway therein, an open-ended sample tube slidably arranged on said shaft having lirst and second positions, a piston head connected to said `tube movable in said housing between said spaced apart ports, said tube being provided with ports and a shoulder adjacent one end thereof, a plug member movable in said tube, said tube engagedly connecting with said valve member to move said valve member to said second position when said tube moves to said second position, said first passageway fiuidly communicating said tube ports and the exterior of said body when said tube is in said second position, said second passageway liuidly communicating the interior of said receptacle and said valve chamber, said third passageway tluidly communicating the interior of said tube, the exterior of said housing and the interior of said housing when said tube is in said second position, a check valve normally closing off fluid communication between said third passageway and the exterior of said housing, fluid pressure means connected to said housing adapted to move said piston from said first to said second position, and biasing means arranged in said housing adapted to move said piston from said second to said first position.

6. A device for sampling fluids comprising a receptacle having oppositely disposed openings therein, a housing mounted on one of said openings and extending exterior of said receptacle, tubular piston means slidably arranged in said housing and extensible entirely through said receptacle from said one opening to said other opening adapted to isolate a fluid sample in said receptacle, movable means within said piston means adapted to remove said isolated sample from said piston means, a body member mounted on the other of said receptacle openings and extending exterior of said receptacle and provided with first and second passageways, said first passageway lluidly communicating the interior and exterior of said body member, said second passageway fluidly communieating the interior of said receptacle and the interior of said body member, a valve member arranged in said body member adapted to liuidly communicate the interior of said piston means and said rst passageway when said piston means extends through said receptacle and lluid pressure means operative in said housing for reciprocating said piston means.

7. A device for sampling uids comprising a receptacle having oppositely disposed openings therein, a housing mounted on one of said receptacle openings and extend-` ing exterior of said receptacle, a shaft arranged in said housing, an open-ended tubular piston slidably arranged on said shaft and extensible entirely through said receptacle from said one opening to said other `opening adapted to isolate a uid sample in said receptacle, a plug member movably arranged in said tubular piston, a body member mounted on the other of said receptacle openings and extending exterior `of said receptacle and provided with first and second passageways lluidly communicating the interior and exterior of said body member and the interior of said receptacle and the interior of said body member, respectively, a valve member arranged in said body member adapted to fluidly communicate the interior of said piston and the exterior of said body member and uid pressure means for moving said piston and said plug member.

8. A device as recited in claim 7 wherein said receptacle is horizontally extending and of rectangular cross seetion and said tubular piston is vertically positioned.

9. A device as recited in claim 7 wherein said receptacle is horizontally extending and of square cross seetiou and said tubular piston is vertically positioned.

10. In apparatus for metering and sampling fluid a metering device comprising a tank provided with eontrolled fluid inlet and outlet means, a fluid receptacle positioned above said tank, rst valve means arranged lbetween said tank and said receptacle adapted to selectively permit and prevent fluid flow therebetween, a sampling device comprising a housing mounted on said tank, tubular piston means slidably arranged in said housing and extensible through said tank adapted to isolate a uid sample in said tank, movable means arranged in said piston means adapted to remove said isolated sample from said piston means, second valve means positioned on said tank adapted to fluidly communicate the interior of said piston means and the exterior of said tank when said piston means extends through said tank, and control means operatively responsive to a rising liquid level in said receptacle adapted to actuate said first valve means, said piston means, and said plug means whereby when lluid communication 4between said tank and receptacle is closed olf by actuation of said first valve means, said piston means extends through said tank and said plug means forces the sample from said piston means.

ll. In apparatus for metering and sampling fluids a metering device comprising a metering tank provided with lirst valve means for controlling admission and discharge of uid to and from said tank, a chamber mounted on said tank, second valve means positioned between said chamber and said tank adapted to selectively permit and prevent uid ow therebetween, a sampling device comprising a housing mounted on said tank, tubular piston means slidably arranged in said housing and extensible through said tank adapted to isolate a fluid sample in said tank, a lluid pressure movable plug member positioned in said piston means adapted to remove said fluid sample from said piston means and then seal against loss of actuating fluid, a body member mounted on said tank provided with first and second passageways fluidly communicating the interior and exterior of said body member and the interior of said receptacle and the interior of said body member, respectively, third valve means arranged in said body member adapted to yiiuidly communicate the interior of said piston means and said rst passageway when said piston means extends through said tank, lfirst control means connected to said chamber operatively responsive to the fluid level in said chamber, second control means fluidly communicating with said first valve means operatively responsive to fluid discharge from said tank, and signal transmission means operatively connecting said first and second control means with said rst and second valve means and said housing, said rst and second control means cooperating with said signal transmission means for actuating said first valve means for admitting fluid to said tank, actuating said second valve means to fluidly communicate said tank and said chamber, and actuating said piston means to retract said piston means and plug from said tank, and for actuating said first valve means for discharging uid from said tank, actuating said second valve means to close ol fluid communication between said tank and said chamber and actuating said piston means to move said piston means through said tank and actuating said plug member to move said plug member through said piston means.

Ray June 16, 1951 Lenhart Feb. 9, 1954

Patent Citations
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US2558387 *Jan 28, 1946Jun 26, 1951Gen Controls CoLiquid sampler
US2668447 *Sep 28, 1951Feb 9, 1954Fuller CoSampling apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2959055 *Jul 9, 1957Nov 8, 1960Jersey Prod Res CoFluid meter
US2979956 *Aug 6, 1958Apr 18, 1961Warren Fred HFluid sampler
US2986940 *Dec 22, 1958Jun 6, 1961Barber Machinery LtdSampling device
US3001398 *Jan 10, 1958Sep 26, 1961Union Tank Car CoMetering separator
US3010317 *Oct 22, 1958Nov 28, 1961Us Industries IncAutomatic custody transfer meter
US3019649 *Aug 16, 1957Feb 6, 1962Phillips Petroleum CoMetering system for liquids
US3023618 *Dec 19, 1957Mar 6, 1962Rolo Mfg CompanyAutomatic liquid meter
US3041876 *Mar 20, 1958Jul 3, 1962Black Sivalls & Bryson IncApparatus for metering liquids
US3054290 *Jun 27, 1957Sep 18, 1962Oil Metering And Proc EquipmenDouble float liquid metering apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification73/863.2, 73/863.84, 73/224
International ClassificationG01N1/14
Cooperative ClassificationG01N1/14
European ClassificationG01N1/14