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Publication numberUS2873052 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1959
Filing dateNov 1, 1954
Priority dateNov 1, 1954
Publication numberUS 2873052 A, US 2873052A, US-A-2873052, US2873052 A, US2873052A
InventorsAtherton William A
Original AssigneeAtherton William A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint can attachment
US 2873052 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'. b- 10, 1959 w. A. ATHERTON 2,873,052

' PAINT CAN ATTACHMENT Filed Nov. 1. 1954 United States Patent PAINT CAN ATTACHMENT William A.'Atherton, Minneapolis, Minn. Application November 1, 1954, Serial No. 465,808

4 Claims. (Cl. 222-510 This invention relates to paint cans. More particularly it relates to an attachment for paint cans for use in the pouring and mixing of the contents of the can.

Present day painting equipment and methods present a number of annoying problems insofar as mixing of the paint and pouring it out of the can in which it is sold is concerned. In attempting to mix a full can of paint it is almost impossible to vigorously stir the contents of the can without some of the paint splashing up and over the opening-defining portions of the can. This makes the can messy when it is necessary to replace the cover upon the can. Also when paint is poured out of a full can, it is impossible to accomplish this operation without some of the paint remaining on the opening defining portions of the can and running therearound in the groove normally provided to retain the paint can cover. Thereafter when the cover is replaced, the paint will squirt outwardly with the result that the entire can is messy and difficult to handle. I

In addition, when the paint can within which the paint is sold is utilized to hold the paint during the painting operation, the painter generally wipes off the excess paint from his brush on the opening-defining portions of the paint can. in doing this, some of the paint always runs down off the brush onto the opening-defining portions of the can with the result that the entire rim portion which receives the cover of the can is very messy and covered with wet paint.

In addition to the above, paint cans as manufactured by various paint can manufacturers vary in elevation and in diameter as to the opening-defining portions of the can. In other words, the inwardly extending rim of the can which defines the opening thereof has a portion thereof more elevated than the corresponding portions of the other cans and the width of this rim taken radially is greater in some cans than in others. Thus it is impossible to use a paint can attachment which is constructed to conform to the shape of the rim for use in conjunction with all types of paint cans. toward eliminating the above annoying problems.

It is a general object of my invention to provide a novel and improved paint can attachment of inexpensive and simple construction and application.

A more specific object is to provide a novel and improved paint can attachment which, in addition to being simple and inexpensive in construction, will greatly facilitate the mixing of paint within the container within which it is sold and the pouring of such paint outwardlytherefrom and the use of such a paint can in painting operations.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved paint can attachment which will enable the painter to mix paint within the container within which the paint is sold without spilling a portion of the contents over the open lug-defining portions of the can and which will enable him to pour the paint from such a can while it is full without leaving some of the paint upon the openingdefining portions of the original container.

.ment which has as an inherent feature thereof, a brush wiper which will prevent the usual mussiness involved when the rim of the original container is used for that purpose in the painting operation.

Another object is to provide a novel paint can attachment which can be manufactured in large numbers with a minimum amount of time, labor and expense.

These and other objects and advantages of my invention will more fully appear from the following drawings made in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of one embodiment ofmy invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the same with a portion thereof shown in vertical section; and

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 3-3 of Fig. 1 showing one embodiment of my invention applied to one type of paint can.

One embodiment of my invention is shown in Fig. 3 applied to a paint can indicated generally as C having an opening 5 and having a rim 6 which constitutes the opening defining portions of the can. A circumferential bead 7 extends radially outwardly a short distancebeyond the vertical walls 8 of the can at the upper end of these walls. This is the conventional type of construction for a paint can with the exception that in some cans the rim or opening-defining portions 6' vary in width taken radially of the can and in some types of can the inner edge of the rim as at 9 varies in elevation. In the. type of can shown in Fig. 3 this edge 9 is disposed above the rest of 'the rim with the exception of the portion which is formed into the bead 7. In other types of cans the portion 9 is at the same elevation as the remainder of the rim. Re-

gardless of the type of can used, however, my paint can My invention is directed attachment will function equally well and can be readily applied thereto without any adjustment.

As best shown in Figs. 1, 2-and 3, my paint can attachment is comprised of a tubular member 10 which has an upper end portion 11 and a lower end portion 12. As can best be seen in Figs. 2 and 3, the tubular member 10 tapers inwardly toward its top. Extending across the.

opening 13 at the top of the tubular member is a panel 14 which subtends an arc of the opening and has a straight edge 15. A cover member 16 is provided for the upper end of the tubular member 10.

Connected to the lower end portion 12 of the tubular member 10 and extending simultaneously upwardly and radially outwardly therefrom is a resilient flange member 17. In other words, the flange extends outwardly and gradually upwardly. As can best be seen in Figs. 2 and 3, this flange member extends upwardly at an acute angle relative to the walls of the tubular member 10. Depending from the more peripheral portions as at 1711 of the flange 17 is a resilient annular support member 18. This support member is very short and resiliently mounts and carries at its lower end in spaced relation to the flange 17, an inwardly extending annular flange member 19 which is both stretchable and resilient and extends inwardly in position to cooperate with the outwardly extending flange 17 to cooperatively grip the bead member 7 of a paint can. The flange 19 is preferably of slightly less radius than the bead 7 and is disposed at an elevation above thelower end portion of the outwardly extending flange l7 and of the tubular member 10.

As best shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the tubular member Patented Feb. 10, 1959 10, the outwardly extending flange 17, the support member 18 and the inwardly extending flange 19 are preferably made integrally and are molded of polyethylene. Thus the entire attachment is made of a stretchable and resilient material so that the outwardly extending flange I7 is sufliciently pliable to be deformed by the rim-defining portions 6 of the paint can C, and so that the annular support 18 and the flange or bead 19 together form a clamp member to clamp the tubular member to the opening-defining portions of the paint can.

To utilize my attachment the flange member 19 is merely forced downwardly over the bead 7 so as to snap into place and engage the underside of the bead, as best shown in Fig. 3. Thereafter the device is ready for use. It will be noted that the inner portions of the flange 17 will be compressed upon the opening-defining edge 9 of the rim 6 by the clamping action of the head 19 and its annular support '18. As best shown in Fig. 3, the inner portions of the flange 17 are slightly deformed and the flange 17 is pressed thereagainst sufficiently strongly to preclude any paint from running outwardly over the rim 6. Regardless of the structure of the rim portion 6 of the can, the inner portions of the flange 17 will bear tightly against the opening-defining portions 9 and preclude passage of the paint between the flange 17 and the edge 9.

l t will be readily appreciated that with my attachment snapped into place, it is a simple matter to stir paint effectively while in the original container without danger of spilling any of the contents. Thus in using my paint can attachment, it is possible to mix the contents of the can without first removing a portion thereof.

An effective fluid-tight seal is provided between the upper surface of the inner rim portion 9 of the can and the lower surface at the inner portion of flange 17 due to the novel construction of the invention attachment when in unattached position. When the attachment is unattached, the upper surface of flange 19 which engages the undersurface of the bead of the can is disposed upwardly of the lower surface formed on the inner portion of flange 17 which engages the upper surface on the inner edge of the rim of the can. When the invention attachment is attached to a can, the inner portion of flange 17 is deformed upwardly with respect to the upper surface of flange 19 as seen most clearly by comparison of Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawing such that the inherent resilience of the attachment urges flange 17 downwardly toward the rim of the can. In this manner, a constant resilient force is proiuced when the attachment is attached to a can which normally urges the lower surface of flange 17 into engagement with the upper surface of the inner edge of the :an rim. A very effective fluid-tight seal is accordingly provided between flange l7 and the rim of the can.

It will also be readily appreciated that with my attachnent connected to the paint can, it is a simple matter to tour paint outwardly from the can without getting the im portions of the can covered with wet paint and there- Jy considerable messiness is avoided.

While painting the painter may leave my attachment napped upon the original paint can and may utiiize it to acilitate the painting operation. In so doing the edge f the panel 14, which constitutes a brush wiper, may be ttilized as a straight edge against which the brush may be viped to remove the excess paint therefrom. It will be eadily appreciated that the paint wiped off the brush will on downwardly into the interior of the can without any -f it flowing upon the rim 6 and thus the rim portions re kept clean and free of wet paint.

When the painting operations are discontinued at the nd of the day, the painter may merely apply the cover tember 16 to the tubular member 10 and permit the aint to remain in the can throughout the night without aving to remove the attachment and apply the paint can over to the can C.

My attachment has the added advantage of being very iexpensive and simple to manufacture. Since it is made of polyethylene it can be molded at a substantial reduction in labor, matcrial and time, and can be manufactured in large numbers and very rapidly. Thus the cost of one of my paint can attachments is kept at a minimum.

Thus it can be readily seen that I have provided a paint can attachment which can be quickly and easily snapped into place upon the opening-defining portions of a paint can and when so attached greatly facilitates the mixing; and pouring of paint and the actual painting operation from the paint can. At the same time it eliminates the mess which normally accompanies painting operations in the pouring, mixing and painting from the original paint can. In addition, it is possible to store the unused paint over night in the original can by merely applying the cover member 16 to the attachment.

It will, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, details, arrangement and proportions of the various parts without departing from the scope of my invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A paint can attachment comprising a tubular memher having an upper and lower end portion, said tubular member having a resilient annular flange at the lower end portion thereof extending outwardly therefrom, said annular flange having an inner portion adjacent said tubular member and an outer portion spaced outwardly of said tubular member, said inner portion having a lower surface for engaging the upper surface of the inner edge of the rim of a paint can or the like, said outer portion including a downwardly extending annular support member, said downwardly extending support member having a lower portion including an inwardly extending'resilient flange, said last mentioned resilient flange having an upper surface for engaging the under surface of the bead on a paint can or the like, said upper surface of said last mentioned resilient flange being positioned upwardly of the lower surface of said inner portion of said first mentioned flange when said attachment is in unattached position, whereby when said attachment is attached in operative position on a paint can or the like, said lower surface is resiliently urged into sealing engagement with the upper surface of the inner edge of the rim of the paint can or the like.

2. A device as defined in claim I wherein said lower surface on said first mentioned annular flange is substantially smooth for providing a universal fit with can rims of varying diameter.

3. A device as defined in claim 1, wherein said annular support member extends downwardly at an acute angle to the lower surface of said resilient annular flange.

4. A paint can attachment comprising a unitary member formed of a thin resilient material, said member having a tubular portion including upper and lower end portions, said member including a resilient annular flange portion at the lower end portion of said tubular portion and extending outwardly from said tubular portion, said annular flange portion having an inner portion adjacent said tubular portion and a outer portion spaced outwardly of said tubular portion, said inner portion having a lower surface for engaging the upper surface of the inner edge of the rim of a paint can or the like, said outer portion including a downwardly extending-annular support member portion, said last mentioned portion having a lower portion including an inwardly extending resilient flange portion, said last mentioned flange portion having at upper surface for engaging the under surface of the head on a paint can or the like, said upper surface of said lastmentioned resilient flange portion being positioned upwardly of the lower surface of said inner portion of said first mentioned flange portion wherein said attachment is in unattached position, whereby when said attachment is attached in operative position on the paint can or the like, said lower surface is resiliently urged into sealing engagement with the upper surface of the inner edge of the rim of the paint can or the like, and said unitary member including a panel portion extending across part of the opening in the upper end of said tubular portion, said panel portion including a substantially straight edge to provide a wiping surface across which a paint brush or the like may be drawn to wipe off excess paint or the like.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,865,736 Astley July 5, 1932 Crandall July '31, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1865736 *Nov 1, 1930Jul 5, 1932Astley Albert EAttachment for paint cans or the like
US2268241 *Jun 21, 1938Dec 30, 1941Brueckel Lee DCan chime cover
US2275305 *Aug 24, 1939Mar 3, 1942Morgan Edward BPaint can protector
US2591482 *May 10, 1948Apr 1, 1952Alfred E BraunPaint can splash protector
US2682360 *Dec 21, 1950Jun 29, 1954American Can CoFriction plug container and pouring spout assembly
US2743844 *Dec 1, 1949May 1, 1956 livingstone
US2756899 *Sep 8, 1953Jul 31, 1956Crandall Lawrence SPaint can rim protector and brush scraper
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3102667 *Mar 9, 1961Sep 3, 1963Ullevig Clifford OPouring spout
US3309000 *Apr 13, 1965Mar 14, 1967Haverstick Virgil LCan extender and pourer
US3329307 *May 27, 1965Jul 4, 1967Ben JacobsonExcess paint remover
US3552607 *Jul 8, 1968Jan 5, 1971Techs IncPour-spout closure for plastic container
US3980213 *Sep 12, 1974Sep 14, 1976Three Dimensional Circuits, Inc.Covers for paint cans
US4020968 *Sep 17, 1975May 3, 1977Victor ChiavolaContainer rim guard and extension device
US4192434 *Aug 14, 1978Mar 11, 1980Federal Paper Board Company, Inc.Container closure assembly
US4312447 *Mar 4, 1980Jan 26, 1982Mcwilliams Rose MMethod and apparatus for enumerative display and disposal of surgical sponges
US4312459 *Sep 27, 1979Jan 26, 1982Leach Albert EPaint can rim cover and lid combination
US4372102 *Dec 11, 1980Feb 8, 1983Mcwilliams Rose MMethod and apparatus for enumerative display and disposal of surgical sponges
US4577776 *Nov 27, 1984Mar 25, 1986Metal Box PlcContainers and lever ring
US4583666 *Apr 9, 1984Apr 22, 1986Buck Donald CContainer attachment
US4893723 *Jun 28, 1988Jan 16, 1990Seabolt John KPaint can attachment
US4949884 *Dec 11, 1989Aug 21, 1990Dahl Gordon TPaint can lid with drip-free pour spout
US4964527 *Dec 18, 1989Oct 23, 1990Martin Harry WPaint saver and can seal protector
US5137188 *Oct 3, 1990Aug 11, 1992Thompson Terry APouring extension for cans
US5169023 *Sep 4, 1991Dec 8, 1992Dart Industries Inc.Tilting mixing bowl
US5392969 *Feb 22, 1994Feb 28, 1995Usery; Charles E.Pouring attachment for a paint can
US5445292 *Sep 9, 1993Aug 29, 1995Plastofilm Industries, Inc.Sealable thermoformed container for liquids
US5641089 *Oct 2, 1995Jun 24, 1997Palank; Fred J.Apparatus and method for covering and protecting the groove of a paint can
US5683009 *Jun 17, 1996Nov 4, 1997King; Randy A.Accessories to enhance the recyclability of metal cans
US5975346 *Jun 30, 1997Nov 2, 1999The Sherwin-Williams CompanyContainer for paints and similar materials
US6269977 *Jan 26, 2000Aug 7, 2001Kim Ira MooreStackable container cover
US6338421 *Nov 19, 1999Jan 15, 2002Fort James CorporationCrack-resistant container lid having opening
US7172090 *Dec 23, 2003Feb 6, 2007Jackson Vernon VContainer accessory for protecting a container rim and brush
US8371483 *Sep 20, 2011Feb 12, 2013Peter B. SanfordLid for containers which have an opening with a rolled inside edge
US8740012 *Jul 25, 2012Jun 3, 2014Phoenix Closures, Inc.Bottle having arcuate mouth and closed circular segment rim with ribs
US20120006821 *Sep 20, 2011Jan 12, 2012Sanford Peter BLid for Containers which have an Opening with a Rolled Inside Edge
US20120055583 *Sep 8, 2010Mar 8, 2012Schnatter John HSauce Leveler Device
US20130092650 *Jul 25, 2012Apr 18, 2013Phoenix Closures, Inc.Bottle assembly with internal scraper, inner seal and cap
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/570, 220/695, 220/731, D09/449, 220/700
International ClassificationB65D25/38, B65D25/48
Cooperative ClassificationB65D25/48
European ClassificationB65D25/48