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Publication numberUS2873113 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1959
Filing dateJun 29, 1955
Priority dateJun 29, 1955
Publication numberUS 2873113 A, US 2873113A, US-A-2873113, US2873113 A, US2873113A
InventorsHenry L Mcwhorter
Original AssigneeMiehle Goss Dexter Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for producing magazines and the like
US 2873113 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 10, 1959 H. L. MCWHQRTER 2,873,113

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MAGAZINES AND THE LIKE Filed June 29, 1955 e sheets-sheet 1 APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MAGAZINES AND THE LIKE Feb. 10, 1959 H. .b McwHoRTER 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 29, 1955 www@ l v 01%0/ CAT-rommsyf NVCNTQ Guen@ L. Gmc

L au l Feb. 10, 1959 H. l.. MCWHORTER 2,873,113

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MAGAZINES AND THE LIKE Filed Juge 29, 1955 6 Sheets-Shes# 5 NVB NTM Feb. 10, 195-9 H. L. MCWHORTER 2,873,113

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MAGAZINES AND THE LIKE CA-rvonmnyf Feb. 1o, 1959 H. L. MCWHORTER 2,873,113

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MAGAZINES AND THE LIKE Filedune 29, 1955 e sheets-Sheet MVEN-rowh-d @fleur La. mecxfxovtef Feb. 10, 1959 H. MGWHRTER 2,873,113

APPARATUS FOR PRoDUcING MAGAZINES AND THE LIKE Filed June 29, 1955 6 sheets-shea*n e from Bvf United States Patent Oy APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MAGAZINES AND THE LIKE Henry L. McWhorter, Riverside, Ill., assigner to Miehle- Goss-Dexter, incorporated, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Application June 29, 1955, Serial No. 518,857

8 Claims. (Cl. 27d-42) This invention relates to a method and apparatus for producing magazines, and particularly to a machine for converting printed webs directly into bound magazines. It will be understood that the term magazines is intended to embrace all other similar printed products.

An invention which is related to the present invention is disclosed and claimed in the copending U. S. application of Curtis S. Crafts and Henry L. McWhorter, Serial No. 518,842, tiled June 29, 1955. In some respects, the present invention is generic to the subject matter disclosed in this copending Crafts and McWhorter application.

In conventional printing practice, magazines are usually printed on rotary web presses having several press units for printing a number of webs simultaneously. After being printed, several of the webs are brought together and fed in associated relation to a folder, which cuts and folds the webs into signatures and then delivers the signatures to one or more conveyors. Packer boys are usually employed to remove the signatures from the conveyors and to pile the signatures into stacks, which are then carried to the bindery.

In the bindery, the magazines are assembled by depositing the signatures one by one on the conveyor of a saddle stitching machine or some other type of binding machine. This operation may be done either by hand or by means of a feeding mechanism. The assembled signatures are stapled, and the edges of the resulting magazines are trimmed square.

The limitations and disadvantages of the conventional procedures for manufacturing magazines have become increasingly evident, particularly as press speeds have been increased in response to the demand for greater production. Folder difficulties at high speeds have often limited the usable speeds of the printing presses. Malfunctioning or choking up of the folders has sometimes occurred, with resulting expensive delays and wastage of paper.V A large amount of expensive hand labor has been required to'stack the signatures after their removal from the press and to perform the subsequent handling operations in the bindery. Moreover, the packer boys have had considerable difficulty in keeping up with the press at high press speeds. With objectionable frequency, the signatures have -been damaged or spoiled in the course of the Various handling operations.

Conventional saddle-stitched magazines are assembled in the bindery by partially opening the signatures into V-shaped form and then interleaving the signatures with one folded edge within another, or fold within fold. The signatures are usually assembled on a saddle shaped conveyor of inverted V-shaped form. In order that the signatures may readily be opened and deposited on the saddle, the signatures are usually folded oil-center so that one edge will overlap the other to form a bindery lap. The signatures may readily be opened by grasping this lap. However, the provision of this lap reduces the amount of space which may be used for printed matter. Moreover, this bindery lap must be trimmed away to f 3 magazines.

2,873,l i3 Patented Feb. 10, i959 square up the magazine, and a considerable waste of paper results.

In a conventional saddle-stitched magazine, all of the signatures are equal in length. As a result, the overlapping edges opposite the fold of the untrimmed magazine are shingled rather than square, because of the interleaving of the signatures, fold Within fold. The shingled portion must be trimmed away and hence is wasted.

One of the principal objects of this invention is to provide a method for producing magazines in such a manner as largely to eliminate the above-enumerated disadvantages and limitations of prior procedures.

A further object is to provide a method for producing magazines by printing and rewinding a plurality of webs,

and then converting the rewound Webs directly into bound magazines. A related object is to provide a method whereby magazines and the like may be printed at a high speed, and then out, folded, assembled, and bound at a comparatively low speed.

A further object is to provide a method and a machine for converting printed webs directly into bound magazines.

A further object is to provide a method for eliminating the shiugling at the side edge of untrimmed saddle-stitched A` related object is to provide a method and a machine for producing saddle-stitched magazines having substantially square edges, even before the final trim.

A further object is to provide a method and an apparatus for producing magazines in such a manner as to eliminate any need for the bindery lap, as such.

`It is still another object of the invention to provide a machine for severing, folding, assembling, and stapling printed signatures so as to produce magazines ready for. a final trimming operation.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic elevational view ofan exemplary printing press adapted to carry out the initial steps of printing and rewinding a web in accordance with out subsequent steps in the method, the view being taken generally along a line 3--3 in Fig. 5.

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic perspective View illustratingl certain steps in the method which are carried out by the binding machine.

Fig. 5 is a somewhat diagrammatic plan view of the binding machine.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary, enlarged elevational sectional view, taken generally along the line 6-6 in Fig. 5, and showing details of a folding unit forming a part of the binding machine, two or more of these folding units being provided.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary enlarged plan View illustrating a web registering mechanism forming a part of each folding unit.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary enlarged elevational sectional view through a cutting cylinder forming a part of each folding unit.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary elevational section, taken along the line 99 in Fig. 5, and showing a cover folding unit.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary plan view showing details of a conveyor embodied in the binding machine.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken through the conveyor, generally along aline 11 in Fig. 10.

Fig. 1`2is a 'perspective 'view of a plow-like signature opening -device `embodied Yin -the-conveyor.

Fig. 13 is a diagrammatic edgewise view of an assembled magazine having a bindery lap and a shingled portion.

Fig. 14 is a view similarto Fig. l0 illustrating a magazine :from which `.the Ibindery llap, -as such, kand the shingled portion have been eiiminated 'in 'accordance with this invention.

While :thelinvention is Asusceptible of various xmodifications and -alternative constructions, there is shown inthe drawings and will herein Ybe described in 'detail the preferred embodiment, but it is to be understood that '"it 'is not thereby intended Lto limi-t 'the 'invention to the funn disclosed, but tit is intended to cover all equivalents, modifications and alternative yconstructions aliing within the spirit and scope -of the invention as expressed in the 'appended-clairns.

In general, the .methtod of this invention involves projducing maga-zines Yfby printing the various pages thereof on -a plurality -of 'Webs and Vthen preferably rewindinjg the 'webs After "all of the pages have thus been primed, the Webs 'are unwound and preferably are Yassociated in suitable groups, the We'bs df "each group being arranged in registered relationship. KSignatures are "then cut `from the associated wbs. Finally, the signatures Vare folded, immediately stacked or nested in the proper order 'and stapiedorldtherwisebound.

dn fthe magazine vxinoduct'ion method yof *this invention, the printing and rewintiing of the 'Webs may be carried out 1ny printing presses of the type lshown in Fig. l. Illusnetted in tthis'view-'is a web :press 26, suppliedwith awe'b 2d =unwound trom 4a supply 'roll '22. Plate cylinders 24 and l25 "are provided for "printing the web 'on both sides. The printed fweb,des'ignated as 936, `is rewound o'n arll 28. For sa purpose toibo enplaiued ibelow, "it :is 'preferable to Quint two diiierei't l"four signature elements 29 and 3D GFi'gZ *tilte'rniiteiy onthe :web 26. This'maj'yibe done by mounting four plates around 'eac'lrof the plate cylinders and 25. These `Vsignature `elements '29 and 30far'e1ultinrately severedat Si, folded at 32, 'and assembled in thefiiriishedmagazine'as partsfo'ftwo diiierent .signatures.

iniaccordancerwith the invention, vnovel means areprovided for converting the printed 'Webs 26 .directly 'into bound magazines or the like. 'This aspect ofthc 'invention :is iillustrated 'inthe `drawings :as embodied in a .binding machine 34 (Figs. 3, 5 andf'6`)provi`tl'ed"with uplara'lity 'df'fdfding units "for unwindiiig, 4cutting anddlding signatures Y:fromtheprinted Websl 26,;ive .suchunits '35u-e being "ai-ranged sideby-side fin this instance.

'To fr'eeive and assemble the signatures fro'rnthe 'folding units 35u-e, the binding machine 34 preferably comprises an ehdless ovzilv-'shaped 'conveyorisystem 37 'having outward and 'inward legs 37a "and '57D threading the Vvfolding units in opposite directions. In this Iinstance, the conyeyoriincludeslatrough Stgenerally o'fV-shaped cross section, together with means for movingthe signatures alongitheftrou'gh.

In addition to the ive folding units '35u-e, "a -vcover folding unit 39is provided and is'positioned 'at the'fbeginng of ifou'tward Vconveyor -Ieg '37a which moves to the right as viewed in Fig. 5.

:As iindicated 1in Figs. f4 :and 5, the cover i'folding ".unit 39-.deposits-:a 'folded cover di), foldfdown, .in ltheitrough 38. The cover 40 is carried along the trough 38 by ythe outwardtconveyor :leg 37a .to the ifolding :unit 26a' which deposits .a .folded :signature #lita 1 on -top .of and inside 'the fold of the cover 40. In like manner, the foldingtunits SSb-fe deposit signatures Atib-.e `on .top lef-,and inside the cover` 40 1 and the .signature fida, .as the latter :ares carried alongthe outwardlleg 3711 of.theconveyorsystem On the'inward leg A'37b the'folding unitsa-fe, .actinginrev verseorder, deposit additional signatures elif-fi. At the endloftheinwardleg37b, the assembledV-shaped--stack gerente v of signatures is stapled through the fold by a stapling mechanism 42 which may be 'of conventional 4construction. Finally, the resulting nnagazines are removed from the conveyor by suitable automatic means, not shown, or by hand. The means whereby these operations are carried out will now be described in detail.

Each of the signature Toldingrunits aee is provided with ra .cutting Iand folding mechanism 43 l(z'igs. ,3, 5 vand 6) and one or more roll stands ,lid adapted to feed the printed webs 26 to the folding mechanism 43, four such stands 44 lbeing 'shown ifor the unit 55Min Fig. 3. 'Each oithe roll stands dit preferably includes upper and lower roll supports 45 and 46 for holding two of the preprinted web 1151115.23, one foi-:immediate A.use .and the other in reserve. One of the printed webs 26 is .drawn from one roll 28 on each roll stand dii and is threaded over suitable guide rollers or bars 4S. All four of the Webs A26 from the respective stands 44 are then led, in associated relationship, 'between a pair ,of nip "rollers '49 and 50 .em-

'bodied 1in the -'folding mechanism d3.

'In onder `to maintain *the four associated lwebs 26 'in registration "with `each other and in :step with the folding mechanism, each *folding Vunit '55h-e 'is provided wfith suitable registration control mechanisms 5:1. A Vportion of teach 'registration mechanism Si is 'mounted 'on the 'roll stand 142i, while Aanother portion is 'associated with the folding mechanism '43. 'ln the present instance, 'the registration control xnechanisms 5,1 'are 'conistruc'ted fin 'accorance 'with the 'Curtis S. Crafts PatentNo 2,522,479, assigned to the same assignee as thepresent applicationlto whi'dh 'patent reference -mayibe had for Ia detailed description. Another suitable construction .'for the mechanisms 51 is disclosed vin 2U. zS. l'Patent No. '2,521,691 to Robert C. Corien., which patent 'is also assigned to `the same assignee.

Briey, each of 'the registration control mechanisms 5i yinciudes `a flaterally movable compensator roller '52 at thefdiding mehanisnr'll (Figs. 'Gand l7) around which a'l'oop Ao'i'the web 2id 'is trained, together with a webpulling in-leed .roller 54, driven by a variable speed drive '5S of :the PIV-differential gear type and located at the rollstand 44. A tension regulatingroller 53 above the compensatorrdller '52% .on 'the stand 44 maintains the web tension substantially constant even if the web Yroll 26 should be `out of'round. A pair of `reversible motors 56 and ar58 is provided, one to adjust the lateralpos'it'ion o'f the .roller `52, and the other .t0 adjust the speed-off -the .ineed'rller idiivejs. 'The motoris ,controlletlby suitable vmeans auch Aas photocells 53, which are located `on the 'folder mechanismd land which detect Whether onnot the web 261s registered with the .folding mechanism 43 by comparing the "lp'hasef -of marks :printed on the web and otmed on a rotating .part of .the older mechanism. This operation 4is more fully .explained in the abovementioned Crats Patent 2,522,479.. In ,this instance, the motor 5.8 is controlled by Aa V pair .of ,limit switches .6D

` and 61, operable'by the compensator Iroller 52 as it appro/adhes Vthe .opposite ends .of :its lateral 4range ottravel.

If Ythe web 26 is .lagging behind .the folding .mechanism 43 for .any.reason, :the .motor 56 is v.started inresponse to signalslfrom'the-,photocells 59so.as to movethe compensator roller '52 'in a direction .to `,provide .a .corrective shortening of the Yweb path as ,explained Tin vthe Crafts patent. On the other'lhand, a tendency ,forthe web tolead causes A,movement o'f .therollerSZ yin the opposite direction,lso as 'to ilengthen l.the web path.

"Cumulative verror fin the vweb,registration is ,corrected by cumulative .movement o'f the compensator .roller 52, continuing until one 'of ,the limit switches '.60 f or 51 'is operated. The latter .cause ihe.motor 5,8 to runin one direction .or ihe `other so ,that 'the speed .of ,the ,in-feed rdller 54.is` gradually decreased, .if .the web is leading, or increasediifthe web isjagging. '.The resulting tightening or s1akeingof1themb `soon hasanovercorrective cheat,

so '.thatltheiphotocells S9 .reverse the .direction of .movement of the compensator roller 52. In this way, the roller 52 is withdrawn from the limit switch so that the motor 58 is stopped. Thereafter, the speed of the in-feed roller 54 remains constant at its new value until the compensator roller 52 again encounters one of the limit switches 60 or 61. Ordinarily, the compensator roller 52 tends to oscillate slowly between its limit positions, always seeking a condition of perfect registration between the web 26 and the folding mechanism 43. Y

To cut the associated webs 26 into signatures, each folding mechanism 43 is provided with a pair of cutting cylinders 62 and 63, each having a cutting knife 64 and a cutting abutment 65 disposed approximately ldiametrically opposite each other. Each cutting knife 64 cooperates with the cutting abutment 65 on the other cutting cylinder, so that the associated webs 26 will be cut into signatures as they pass between the two cutting cylinders 62 and 63. Two signatures are cut from the webs 26 during each revolution of the cutting cylinders 62 and 63.

To take and control the severed 'leading edge of the webs 26 after each cutting operation, each of the cutting cylinders 62 and 63 is provided with a set of impaling pins 66 mounted on the cylinder in closely trailing relation to the cutting knife 64. It will be understood that the impaling pins 66 on the two cutting cylinders 62 and 63 alternate in carrying the leading edges of the webs 26, rst to the left and then to the right, approximately halfway around the respective cylinders 62 and 63. Thus, at the moment that each signature is cut from the associated webs, the signature will be positioned part way around one of the cutting cylinders 62 and 63.

To fold the signatures, each of the cutting cylinders 62 and 63 is provided with a tucking or folding blade 67 which trails the cutting knife 64 by approximately 90. To cooperate with the folding blades 67, the folding mechanism 43 is provided with a pair of folding cylinders 68 and 69. Each of the folding blades 67 is operative to tuck the alternate signatures, approximatelyv at their midpoints, into a set of folding jaws 70 mounted on the adjacent folding cylinder 68 or 69. Thus, the signatures taken by the cutting cylinder 62 will be folded into the folding jaws 70 on the folding cylinder 68, while those taken by the cutting cylinder 63 will be folded into the jaws 70 on the folding cylinder 69. By suitable means, the folding cylinders 68 and 69 are driven at the same speed as the cutting cylinders 62 and 63, but in the opposite direction. Thus, the alternate signatures will be drawn away from the cutting cylinders 62 and carried around the respective folding cylinders 68 and 69.

To take and deliver the signatures from the folding cylinders 68 and 69, each folding mechanism 43 is provided with a pair of delivery cylinders 71 and 72 disposed adjacent the respective folding cylinders 68 and 69. Before being transferred to the delivery cylinders 71 and 72, the alternate signatures pass between the folding cylinders 68 and 69 and cooperating slowdown rollers 73 and 74 respectively which, by being driven at a speed less than that of the folding cylinders, are operative to withdraw the folded edges of the signatures from the folding jaws 70. The folded edges of the signatures are thereupon taken by grippers 75 on the vdelivery cylinders 71 and 72.

After being carried part way around the delivery cylinders 71 and 72, the alternate signatures are released by the grippers 75 and deposited folded edge first on delivery tapes 76 and 77 which are driven at approximately the same surface speed as the delivery cylinders 71 and 72 so that there will be little or no overlapping of the successive signatures on the tapes 76 and 77. The tapes extend downwardly and outwardly to points adjacent the respective outward and inward legs 370." and 37b of the conveyor 37, so that the signatures will be deposited in the trough 38 of the conveyor, with the folded edge in the bottom of the trough.

ATo carry thesignatures along the V-shaped trough 38, the conveyor system 37 is provided with a plurality of pushers 80 extending upwardly through a longitudinal slot 81 formed in the bottom of the trough 38. In this instance, the pushers 80 are advanced by means of an endless chain 82, which is threaded around the conveyor 37 adjacent the trough 38. As shown, the chain 82 and all of the folding units 35u-e and 39 are geared to a common drive shaft 83 so that the movement of the pushers 80 will be synchronized with the depositing of the signatures in the trough 38.

Provision is made for opening or partly unfolding the signatures after they are deposited in the trough 38. To this end, the conveyor system 37 is provided with a plurality of plows or opening devices 85 positioned in the trough 38 adjacent the outer ends of the delivery tapes 76 and 77. As shown, each plow 85 has a V-shaped point 86 projecting downwardly into the trough 38 at a point slightly in advance of the position at which the corresponding delivery tapes 66 or 67 will deposit the signatures. As the signatures are carried along the trough 38, the plow points 86 will enter between the opposite sides of the topmost signatures. Inasmuch as the folding action of the folding jaws 70 is not complete, these opposite sides of the signatures will stand apart to a certain extent and thus will afford an opening for -entry of the plow point 86. As the signatures pass under the plow, the sides of the plow 85 will push the sides of the signatures outwardly against the trough 38.

To hold the signatures open -while permitting an additional signature to be deposited in the trough 38, each of the plows 85 is provided with a pair of guides or wings 87 which extend from the point 86 along the trough 38 in the direction of movement of the pushers 8i). It will be seen that the wings extend only along the top portion of the trough 33 so that they will hold the signatures open while permitting the entry of an addi tional signature into the trough. Each signature is deposited in the trough 38 on top of the stack of signatures passing under the adjacent plow 85 and then is picked up by the pusher S0 and carried along the trough 38 to the next folding unit and plow.

In the case of the cover folding unit 39, the construction is modified somewhat to allow for the fact that this folding unit deposits only one kind of signature, and only on the outward leg 37a of theconveyor system 37. Thus, this folding unit 39 comprises only one of the roll stands 44, which is adapted to supply a single one of the webs 26 to a folding mechanism 90. A single one of the registration control mechanisms Sl'is embodied in the cover folding unit 39 to maintain the web 26 in step with the folding mechanism 99. The web 26 is threaded through the registration control mechanism 51 and then between the nip rollers 49 and 50. To cut the cover web 26 into signatures, the folding mechanism 90 is provided with a pair of cutting cylinders 91 and 92. Mounted on the cutting cylinder 91 is a pair of cutting knives 93 closely trailed by impalingpins 94. Tocooperate with the knives 493, the cutting cylinder 92 is provided with a pair of cutting abutments 95. It will be understood that signatures are cut from the web 26 points on a folding cylinder 98 disposed adjacent the cutting cylinder 91. The folded signature is carried part way around the folding cylinder 98 underneath a slows down roller 99 which withdraws the folded edge of the signature from the folding jaws 97 so that the folded edge may be taken readily by a set of grippers 100 mounted on a delivery cylinder 101. After the signature has been carried part way around the delivery cylinder 101, it is released by the grippers 100 and .deposited I claim as my invention:

1. In a machine for producing magazines or the like of the type consisting of a plurality of signatures, the combination comprising an endless conveyor having outbound and inbound legs for receiving stacks of assembled signatures, means for supplying a plurality of webs on each of which two signatures for the magazine are printed alternately, a plurality of folders disposed at intervals along the conveyor for receiving said webs and cutting and folding the signatures therefrom, each of said folders having means for delivering the signatures alternately to the outbound and inbound legs of the conveyor so that each folder will contribute two signatures to each magazine.

2. In a machine for producing magazines or the like, the combination comprising means for supplying a plurality of webs on each of which two signatures for the magazine are printed alternately, a plurality of folders for receiving the respective webs and cutting and folding the signatures therefrom, and an endless conveyor having an outbound leg running to each of the folders in successive order and an inbound leg returning to the folders in reverse order, each of said folders having means for delivering the signatures alternately to the respective legs of the conveyor so that each folder contributes two signatures to each magazine.

3. In a machine for producing magazines or the like, the combination comprising, a plurality of web reels for supporting preprinted webs in the form of rolls, each of the webs having two different signatures for the magazine printed alternately thereon, a plurality of folders arranged to receive the printed webs directly from the web reels and to cut and fold the signatures from the webs, and an endless conveyor having an outbound leg running to each of the folders in successive order and an inbound leg returning to the folders in reverse order, each of said folders having means for delivering the signatures alternately to the respective legs of the conveyor so that each folder contributes two different signatures to each magazine.

of the type consisting of a plurality of folded signatures arranged fold-within-fold, the combination comprising, means for supplying a pluralityof webs on each of which two different signatures for the magazine are printed alternately, a plurality of folders for receiving the respective webs, each of said folders having means for cutting and folding signatures which are alternately longer and shorter than the mean length of said signatures, the mean length being the same for all of the folders, the deviation of the length of the individual signatures from the mean length being progressively smaller for the successive folders, and a conveyor running in an outbound leg to each of the folders in successive order and then returning in an inbound leg to the folders in reverse order, each of said folders having means for delivering the longer signatures to one leg of the conveyor and the shorter signatures to the other leg thereof so as to form magazines having square rather than shingled edges.

5. In a machine for producing magazines or the like of the type comprising a plurality of folded signatures arranged fold-within-fold, the combination comprising, a plurality of folders, each of said folders having a plurality of roll stands for supporting a plurality of preprinted web rolls consisting of printed, rerolled webs, two different signature elements being printed alternately on each of said webs, means for feeding the webs directly to the folder in associated and registered relation, and means for cutting and folding the associated webs into signatures which are alternately longer and shorter than 4. In a machine for producing magazines or the like the mean length thereof, the mean length being the same for all of the folders, and a conveyor running in an outbound leg to each of the folders in successive order and then returning in an inbound leg to the folders in reverse order, each of said folders having means for delivering the longer signatures to one leg of the conveyor and the shorter signatures to the other leg thereof so as to form magazines having square rather than shingled edges.

6. In a machine for producing magazines or the like of the type comprising a plurality of folded signatures arranged fold-within-fold, the combination comprising, a plurality of folders, each of said folders having a plurality of roll stands for supporting a plurality of preprinted web rolls consisting of printed and rerolled webs, two different signature elements being printed alternately on each of said webs, means for-feeding the webs directly to the folder in associated and registered relation, and means for cutting and folding the associated webs into signatures which are alternately longer and shorter than the mean length thereof, the mean length being the same for all of the folders, a V-shaped trough extending in an outbound leg to each of the folders in successive order and then returning in an inbound leg to each of the folders in reverse order, said folders having respective means for delivering the longer signatures fold down to the outbound leg of the trough at spaced points and the shorter signatures fold down to the inbound leg of the trough at spaced points, a series of plow-like members in the trough for opening the signatures into V- shaped form, a conveyor having spaced fingers for pushing the signatures along the trough so that magazines are progressively assembled as the successive signatures are deposited, and means along the trough for binding the magazines through the fold.

7. In a cutting mechanism for severing signatures from a printed web, the combination comprising a pair of adjacent cutting cylinders for receiving the web and cutting signatures therefrom, each of said cylinders having a pair of cutting elements disposed generally in diametrical relationship, the cutting elements of each cylinder being in mating relationship with the cutting elements of the other cylinder, and means for selectively positioning one of the cutting elements at any point within predetermined peripheral limits so that the signatures will alternately be cut longer and shorter than the mean length thereof.

8. In a cutting mechanism for severing signatures from a printed web, the combination comprising a pair of adjacent cutting cylinders for receiving the web and cutting signatures therefrom, said cylinders having two pairs of mating cutting elements so that tw'o signatures will be cut from the web for each revolution ofthe cylinders, and means for adiusting the relative timing of said pairs of mating elements to any selected value within predetermined limits so that one of/said two signatures will be longer than the other. f

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 658,773 Goss Oct. 2, 1900 785,935 Cottrell Mar. 28, 1905 1,067,470 Cottrell July 15, 1913 1,264,753 Barber Apr. 30, 1918 1,659,099 Halvorsen Feb. 14, 1928 1,831,497 Kast Nov. 10, 1931 2,324,834 Gurwick July 20, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS 22,297 France May 25, 1921

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3813093 *Feb 1, 1972May 28, 1974Rahdener Maschinenfab Kolbus ADevice for inserting bookmarks into books
US3948504 *Mar 18, 1974Apr 6, 1976Motter Printing Press Co.Method and apparatus for forming and collating printed signatures
US3977665 *Jul 17, 1974Aug 31, 1976Strachan & Henshaw LimitedContinuous book-making system
US3987722 *Dec 30, 1974Oct 26, 1976Addressograph Multigraph CorporationDual printing with single master supply source
US4025065 *May 27, 1975May 24, 1977Timsons LimitedMethod of and machinery for producing book blocks
US4279409 *Jun 18, 1980Jul 21, 1981Pemberton Bernard EProcess of making signatures from preprinted webs for the manufacture of magazines or the like
US4295643 *Jun 2, 1980Oct 20, 1981Vega Alejandro J DeApparatus and method for handling jackets of printed matter
US4601462 *Jul 3, 1984Jul 22, 1986Drg (Uk) LimitedBook making apparatus and method with divertor between bindaries
US4775136 *May 29, 1987Oct 4, 1988M.A.N. Roland Druckmaschinen AgSheet folding and transport system, particularly for printed paper copy sheets, and folded sheet element separating method
US5028193 *Apr 26, 1989Jul 2, 1991Misicka James ASaddle-bound books, magazines and the like and process for manufacture same
US6095511 *Jul 22, 1998Aug 1, 2000Ferag AgProcessing channel for incoming imbricated printed products
US6283466 *Jan 20, 1998Sep 4, 2001Ferag AgDevice for producing printed materials in several parts
US8371571Aug 1, 2011Feb 12, 2013Mueller Martini Holdings AgMethod and device for inserting supplements into multipage printed products
Classifications
U.S. Classification270/12, 270/21.1, 83/336, 83/358, 270/37, 270/52.18, 270/52.29
International ClassificationB42C19/06
Cooperative ClassificationB42C19/06, B65H2301/4533
European ClassificationB42C19/06