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Publication numberUS2873449 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1959
Filing dateApr 26, 1957
Priority dateApr 26, 1957
Publication numberUS 2873449 A, US 2873449A, US-A-2873449, US2873449 A, US2873449A
InventorsHerbert Robert E
Original AssigneeHerbert Robert E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game carrier
US 2873449 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 17, 1959 R. E. HERBERT 2,87

GAME CARRIER Filed April 26, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.2 Q 20 XA INVENTOR Roberf E. Herber+ ATTORNEY R. E. HERBERT Feb. 17, 1959 GAME CARRIER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 26, 1957 I INVENTOR Roberf E. Herberf ATTORNEY;

United States Patent GAME CARRIER Robert E. Herbert, St. Joseph, Mo. Application April 26, 1957, Serial No. 655,309 1 Claim. (Cl. 294) This invention relates to improvements in game carriers, and more particularly to game carriers in the form of an interliner adapted to be received within the game pocket of a hunting coat.

Hunting coats are normally constructed in a standard manner with a game pocket formed along the lowermost portion of the body of the coat and having flap covered openings to the pocket at the rear of the coat for insertion of game therethrough into the game pocket; said game pocket having a top opening interiorly of the coat for substantially the entire length of the pocket for removal of game from the pocket. After one hunting trip, the blood from the game, inserted into and carried within the game pocket will have saturated the flaps at the rear of the coat and have soaked through the bottom of the game coat rendering the coat unsightly. The blood upon the flaps will have stained any car upholstery, etc., that it may have come in contact with and the blood which has soaked through the bottom of the pocket will have stained the hunters shirt and pants, making the storage of game within such game pocket very unsatisfactory.

The principal object of this invention is the provision of a game coat pocket interliner for insertion within the pocket of a hunting coat and having sleeve members extending therefrom and adapted to be extended through the openings at the rear of the coat, so that game may be inserted through the interliner sleeves and carried in the interliner without fear of soiling the coat and/or anything the coat contacts.

A further object is the provision of a game coat pocket interliner that can be carried within the game pocket of a hunting coat and removed therefrom when containing game, all without subjecting the hunting coat to stains from the blood of the game so that the hunting coat can be worn at all times in sightly condition including the trip to and from the hunting area.

A further object is the provision of a game coat pocket interliner for insertion within the game pocket of a hunting coat that can be folded or rolled into a compact package so that several interliners can be taken on a hunting trip and when the one inserted in the game coat pocket is full it can be removed and cached or given to the guide and a fresh interliner inserted in the game coat pocket.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a game carrying container into which game can be easily inserted and easily removed.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a game carrying container having a sleeve intermediate the ends of the containencxtending therefrom and opening thereinto, so that game may be inserted throughout the length of the container from a somewhat central location andthe game first inserted will not have to be pushed, the entire length of the container to make room for the game later stored.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a the game is inserted into the container, that are resilientgame carrying container, having openmgs through which 1 "ice.

1y held in a closed position easily spread apart for the insertion of game, and adapted to close imediately after the game is inserted.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent during the course of the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a portion of this specification and in which drawings:

Figure l is a view of the interior of a hunting coat having a game pocket along the lower body portion thereof, with my improved game coat pocket interliner shown in dotted lines as within the pocket.

Figure 2 is a rear view of a hunting coat having rear openings to the game coat pocket and showing the sleeve members of the game coat pocket interliner extending therethrough.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary interior view of a hunting coat, showing the game coat pocket, with portions of the pocket broken away to show the game coat pocket interliner inserted therein.

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially on the line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary view similar to Figure 4, but showing one of the sleeve members folded back into the game pocket for traveling rather than extended through the rear flaps, ready for use, as is shown in Figure 4.

Figure 6 is a plan view of my improved game carrying container embodying aslide fastener.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view taken substantially on the line 7--7 of Figure 3.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7, but embodying a snap fastener rather than a slide fastener.

Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 7, butshowing the container with a folded over portion rather than a slide fastener or snap fastener.

Figure 10 is a plan view of the container of Figure 8.

Figure 11 is a plan view of the container of Figure 9'.

Figure 12 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partly in section, of the resilient means for closing the passageway through the sleeve member.

In the drawings, wherein for the purpose of illustration are shown preferred and modified forms of the inven tion and wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the letter A designates generally a hunting coat; B an improved game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container embodying a slide fastener; C a game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container embodying a snap fastener; and D a game coat pocket interliner and game carryingcontainer having a folded over portion.

The hunting coat A comprises a body portion 20 comprising a back section 21 and side sections 22 and 23 afiixed to the back section by seams 24 and 25. The hunting coat may also include sleeves 26 and 27 and conventional pockets 28 and 29.

A pocket 33 is formed across the lowermost portion of the body portion 20 by sewing a panel 34 interiorly of the body portion joining the panel 34 to the body portion 30 by side seams 36 and 37 and a bottom seam 38. The uppermost portion 39 of the pocket is normally held adjacent the body portion 20 by buttons 41, secured to the body portion 20, fitting through the button holes 43 in the pocket 33, defining a pocket chamber 44.

Apertures 45 and 46, adjacent the seams 24 and 25; and extending substantially the depth of the pocket 33 are provided transversely through the body portion20 afford ing an opening from the rear of the coat to interiorly of the pocket chamber 44. 1 j Flaps48 and 49 may be secured to the seam s 24;an d 25 along the length of the apertures 45 and 46 to provide a finished appearance to the coat and hide the apertures 45 and 46 from vi w- The game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container B comprises an elongated flexible fluid proof, tubular body portion 50, preferably of plastic, having side walls 51 and 52 joinedat the side edges at 53 and 54, at the lowermost edges at 55, and for a short distance at the uppermost edges at 56, the remainder of the uppermost edges ofthe side walls 51 and 52 being joined by the slide fasteners 57 and .58, defining a chamber 60.

Aflixed to and extending outwardly from the side 51 are a pair of sleeve members 61 and 62 which define passageways 63 and 64 opening into the chamber 60. The passageways open into the chamber 60 above the bottom thereof so that fluid within the chamber 60 will not flow out through the passageways 63 and 64.

Secured to the outermost ends 65 and 66 of the sleeves 61 and .62 preferably by inturned hems 67 and 68, are substantially straight resilient members 69, 70, 71 and 72. The resilient members 69 and 70 are secured at the outermost end 65 of the sleeve 61 and the resilient members 71 and 72 at the outermost end 66 of sleeve 62. The resilient members extend substantially the entire width of the pa ssageways 63 and 64 and are sufliciently rigid so that the members 69 and 70 assume a substantially parallel relationship (as shown in Figure 12) substantially closing the passageway 63, and the members 71 and 72 likewise assume a substantially parallel relationship substantially closing the passageway 64. The resilient members 69 and 70 are tubular lengths of resilient material (rubber or plastic) not likely to corrode upon exposure to moisture. As shown they are tubular and thus devoid of sharp edges. Thus they will not puncture or injure the sleeves. Th passageways 63 and 64 may be opened (as shown in dot and .dash lines in Figure 12) for insertion of game into the chamber 60 by spreading the parallel resilient members apart.

The game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container C comprises an elongated, flexible, fluid proof, tubular body portion 75, preferably of plastic, having side walls 76 and 77 joined at the side edges at 78 and 79, at the lowermost edges at 80, and closed at the uppermost edges by snap fasteners 81, defining a chamber 82.

Sleeve members 84 and .85, identical to the sleeve members 61 and 62 of the game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container A, are alfixed to the side wall 75 and open into the chamber 82.

The game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container D comprises an elongated, flexible, fluid proof, tubular body portion 88, preferably of plastic, having side walls 89 and 90 joined at the side edges at 91 and 92, at the lowermost edges at 93, the side portion 89 being of a greater width than side portion 90 and forming a flap -94 which is folded over the exterior of the side wall 90, defining a chamber 9-5 between the side walls 89 and 90.

Sleeve members 96 and 97, identical to the sleeve members 61 and 62 of the game coat pocket interliner or game carrying container A, are aflixed to the sidewall 89 and openinto the chamber 95.

The terms game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container have been applied to the forms B, C and D as these may be utilized as a game coat pocket interliner when inserted in a game coat pocket, at which time they are also a game carrying container, and may also be utilized for carrying game when not used in association with a game coat pocket, at which time they are merely a game carrying container. As the term game carrying container covers both uses, this broader term has been applied whenever practicable.

The forms B, C and D difier from each other only in the manner in which the uppermost edges of the body portions are secured together; the form B having a slide fastener which may extend entirely across the length of the body portion, or part way'across, as shown in Figure -6; the form 76 C having a series of snap fasteners that may extend only partially across the lenth of the body portion, or entirely across the length of the body portion, as shown in Figure 10; the form D having a flap extension extending from one side wall and folding over the other side wall, as shown in Figure 11. These uppermost edges are secured in such a fashion so that they may be opened a suificient distance for the facile removal of game carried within the body portions.

A manner of use (as applied to the form B, and from which the manner of forms C and D will be readily apparent) is as follows:

The hunting coat A is opened as shown in Figure 1 and pocket 33 is opened by removing the buttons 41 from the button holes 43. The game coat pocket interliner and carrying container B is inserted within the chamber 44. The sleeves 61 and 62 may be folded inside of the chamber 44, as shown in Figure 5, so the coat has a finished appearance. The button holes 43 are then slipped over the buttons 41, closing the pocket and the .coat put on.

When it is desired to place game within the game coat pocket interliner and carrying 'case B, the hunter merely reaches through the apertures 45 and 46 and draws the sleeves 61 and 62 out through the apertures to the position shown in Figure 4. The hunter then inserts the game through one of the sleeves, say sleeve 61, by pushing resilient members 69 and 70 apart and inserting the game through the passageway 63 and into the chamber 60. It will beseen that the game can be inserted within the chamber 60 toward either end thereof, thereby avoiding the necessity of pushing the first inserted game through the chamber 60 in order to make room for subsequent game.

When the first game coat pocket interliner and game carrying case is filled it can be removed from the game pocket 33 and cached, stored, or carried by the guide as a game carrying container, and a second game .coat pocket interliner and game carrying case inserted within the pocket 33 in the same manner as the first, and hunting continued.

As the game coat pocket interliner and game carrying container is fluid proof, the blood from the game cannot leak therethrough and stain the coat, and as the sleeve members leading into the container extend out past the coat, game can be inserted into the container without touching any part of the coat thereby assuring that the hunting coat will remain free from blood stains from game carried therein.

Various changes may be made to the forms of invention herein shown and described without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the following claim.

I claim:

In game carrying ekuipment, the combination of a hunting coat defining a game receiving pocket having an aperture leading thereinto, a pocket interliner positioned within said pocket, said interliner comprising a body portion of material impervious to fluid and defining afluidproof chamber therein, and a sleeve member of material impervious to fluid secured to said body portion in proximity to that portion of said interliner adjacent the aperture in said coat, said sleeve member defining a passageway opening into said chamber and being of a length suflicient to extend from said interliner through the aperture in said coat, and beyond the main body of said coat so that game may be introduced into said pocket interliner through said sleeve without contacting the coat.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,121,448 Aud Dec. 15, 1914 1,211,853 Huggins Jan. 9, 1917 1,224,842 Boyd May 1, 1917 (Other references on following page) Grant ..2 Feb. 19, 1918 Cox June 17, 1919 Pohlkotte Mar. 20, 1923 Rich Sept. 25, 1928 Jennings July 26, 1932 Shanhouse Mar. 14, 1939 Grady Mar. 30, 1943 6 Falcon May 16, 1944 Jones July 19, 1949 Zaleski Nov. 8, 1949 Herman Dec. 19, 1950 Cicero Nov. 4, 1952 Galland Feb. 14, 1956 .FOREIGN PATENTS France Nov. 29, 1929

Patent Citations
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US1224842 *Oct 13, 1916May 1, 1917Harcourt W BoydAutomatic pocket-closer.
US1256787 *Jul 13, 1916Feb 19, 1918William P GrantSafety-pocket.
US1307244 *Nov 30, 1917Jun 17, 1919 Game-retaining gabmebtt
US1448940 *Dec 5, 1921Mar 20, 1923Gem Shirt CompanyGarment
US1685243 *Dec 29, 1927Sep 25, 1928Woods Rich JohnGame pouch
US1869261 *Dec 10, 1931Jul 26, 1932Skelton Jennings RubyPocket
US2150251 *May 12, 1938Mar 14, 1939Leonard ShanhouseHunting coat
US2315416 *Jul 8, 1939Mar 30, 1943Drybak CorpHunting coat
US2349035 *Apr 4, 1941May 16, 1944Drybak CorpConvertible coat
US2476665 *Feb 18, 1947Jul 19, 1949Utica Duxback CorpSportman's hunting coat
US2487506 *Feb 12, 1946Nov 8, 1949Zaleski Stella SPhotographer's lightproof bag
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US2616467 *Jan 7, 1949Nov 4, 1952William CiceroSandbag
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FR676693A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5063614 *Jan 29, 1991Nov 12, 1991Mcsheffery Kenneth EReversible garment having detachable pockets
US5452476 *Jan 26, 1994Sep 26, 1995Jenks; KennethAnorak attached to belt pouch for easy deployment and use with a backpack
US5570473 *Mar 24, 1995Nov 5, 1996Andries; Kenneth C.Caddy having a hanger means and integral to a jacket for selectively supporting companion pants for storage and access
US6012167 *May 13, 1998Jan 11, 2000W. M. GrilliotGarment having rope-carrying pocket
US6134713 *Sep 22, 1999Oct 24, 2000Norcross Safety Products, L.L.C.Garment having rope-carrying pocket
US20100064411 *Sep 10, 2009Mar 18, 2010Anita PriceArm-securing garment
US20130019379 *Aug 27, 2012Jan 24, 2013Marg ShadidUtility jacket for dog walking
WO1999058008A2 *May 12, 1999Nov 18, 1999Norcross Safety Products L L CGarment having rope-carrying pocket
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/94
International ClassificationA01M31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01M31/006
European ClassificationA01M31/00C