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Publication numberUS2873503 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1959
Filing dateJun 13, 1956
Priority dateJun 13, 1956
Publication numberUS 2873503 A, US 2873503A, US-A-2873503, US2873503 A, US2873503A
InventorsDavis Arthur E
Original AssigneeSonoco Products Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete column form for square columns
US 2873503 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 17, 1959 A. E. DAVIS CONCRETE COLUMN FORM FOR SQUARE COLUMNS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 15, 1956 INVENTOR.

ARTHUR E. DAVIS BY ATTORNEYS Feb. 17, 1959 A. E. DAVIS 2,873,503

CONCRETE COLUMN FORM FOR SQUARE COLUMNS Filed June 13, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ARTHUR E. DAV/5 A TTORNE Y6 aw-q gL United States Patent CONCRETE COLUMN FORM FOR SQUARE COLUMNS Arthur E. Davis, Chicago, Ill., assiguor to Sonoco Products Company, a corporation of South Carolina Application June 13, 1956, Serial No. 591,237

8 Claims. (Cl. 25-118) This invention relates to paper tube forms for use in molding concrete columns and the like, and more particularly, to the molding of square concrete columns.

Much difficulty is encountered in erecting wooden forms for the pouring of concrete columns. The wooden forms require considerable external bracing ,as the internal amount of time and labor and in many instances results in a column slightly larger or smaller than its design due to the speed of erection.

According to the present invention, most of the dimis removed. The concrete forms in this inventionare preformed forms and the only labor required is in placing the preformed forms in the position where the finished columns are desired. After the preformed form is placed I mains in contact with the hardened concrete.

culty involved in the building of square forms in place in position and aligned, a minimum amount of bracing is required for holding the form in the aligned position. There is no labor or time involved in measuring the form or in positioning various members as the preformed form is constructed for a predetermined height and .diameter, and is available for the pouring of concrete or the like immediately after it has been erected and aligned.

This preformed form is usually constructed at a location remote from the area where it is to be employed and is shipped or transported to the construction site for immediate use. In the construction, of this ,form', a circular, tubular paper tube 'is provided and two parallel pairs of panels are placed inside the paper tube. The internal hydrostatic pressure of the poured concrete within the area defined by the pairs of panels is trans mitted to the wall of the paper tube and is equalized by the entire circular wall. This equalization of pressure by the circular wall allows for a minimum amount of bracing, much less than that required by the conventional square wooden or plywood form and also allows a minimum thickness for panels and the paper tube.

These and other features of the present invention are described in further detail below in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation view showing the several steps involved in stripping the preformed form from a concrete column;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the preferred embodiment of the completed preformed form;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of a modification of the completed preformed form; and

Fig. 4 is a top plan view of a further modification of the completed preformed form.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, and more particularly at first to Figure 1, the concrete preformed form of the present invention is preferably formed by ICE spirally winding a plurality of paper strips to form a laminated or multi-ply circular tubular body 10 of desired height, wall thickness and diameter, determined by the size of the concrete column desired. After the concrete is poured the tubular body 10 is stripped away by cutting or other means and the square form indicated generally by 12, which will be explained more in detail later, re-

The square form is next stripped from the finished concrete column 14 and the concrete column 14 remains in place in the desired position.

The square form 12 that is placed inside the circular tubular body 10 is disclosed more fullyin Figs. 2 3 and .4 in which two parallel pairs of panels 16, 18 are arranged with their edges against the interior face of the tubular body 10. The panels 16, 18 are preferably made of' plywood or Masonite panelwood of approximately A inch to /1 inches in thickness, although various other materials can be used to advantage. The edges of adjacent panels are not in contact with each other, but are can be easily stripped from the finished concrete column.

The preferred form of corner strips consists of two flat metal strips, such as United States Standard 30 gauge sheet metal, that have their outer edges bent inwardly at different widths. These two metal strips after bending areplaced in face-to-face contact and thereby form pockets between the bent edges that receive and tend to position the panels.

Filler elements 22 are provided to give' additional support to the panels and to transmit directly the internal hydrostatic pressure created by the poured concrete to the circular paper tube. Various forms and types of filler elements can be used, but one type that has proven to be most .satifactory is wooden strips of 2 inches by 4 inches. The filler elements 22 are usually nailed or otherwise secured to the panels 16, 18 and to the circular tubular body 10. Figure 2 shows a convenient form of Fig. 3 discloses only one wooden strip behind each panel and Figure 4 discloses two Wooden strips behind each of one pair of panels 18 and one wooden strip behind each of the other pair of panels 16. It is obvious that an infinite selection of filler elements may be used in the present invention.

In the construction of my preformed form, I usually secure the filler elements 22 to the panels 16, 18 and then secure the corner strips 20 to the panels which are received in the pockets created by the corner strips 20. This completes the preformed form except for placing of the panels, corner strips and fillers within the circular tubular body 10. The next step therefore is placing the panels 16, 18 with the filler elements 22 and corner strips 20 secured thereto inside the tubular body 10 and securing the filler elements 22 to the tubular body 10 in order to hold the panels 16, 18 in place within the circular tubular body 10. After this step, the preformed form is completed and available for shipment to the particular location in which it is desired. It should be noted that the preformed form can be made of various diameters and of different heights depending on its desired use. Its design is therefore, highly flexible and suitable for use in practically any type of construction where square col- 'umns are desired. The contractor or user needs only to spaced, being separated by a portion of the tubular body order the desired preformed column forms from a plant making the forms and the forms will be sent available for use immediately.

In use, the preformed concrete form is placed in the position where the finished column is desired and concrete is poured inside the column form and allowed to set. Next, the circular tubular body is stripped by unwrapping its spiral plies or by cutting it longitudinally and then unwrapping it. The panels 16, 18, corner strips 20 and filler elements 22 can then be removed and the completed column. remains. I

The invention has been described above for purposes of illustration, and is not intended to be limited only by a 2. A preformed concrete form adapted for use in molding square concrete columns comprising a circular l tubular, paper body, two spaced parallel pairs of panels disposed within said tubular body, one pair of said parallel panels being in a'perp'endicular relation to the other pair of said panels, and filler means extending for the entire length of said panels and supporting said panels between each of said panels and said tubular form.

3. A preformed concrete form adapted for use in molding square concrete columns having chamfered corners comprising'a circular tubular, paper body, two, 1

spaced parallel pairs of panels disposed within said circular body, corner forming means arranged at each corner of the enclosed area defined by said parallel pairs of panels, said corner means forming chamfered corners on the square concrete columns, and means supporting said panels from said paper body against internal pressure.

4. A concrete form adapted for use in molding square concrete columns comprising a tubular, circular paper body, two parallel pairs of panels disposed within said circular body, one pair of said parallel panels being in a perpendicular relation to the other pair of said parallel'panels, corner forming means arranged at each corner of the enclosed area defined by said parallel pairs of panels, and means supporting said panels from said paper body against internal pressure.

5. A concrete form adapted for use in molding square concrete columns comprising a circular tubular paper body, two parallel pairs of panels disposed within said circular paper body, one pair of said parallel panels being in a perpendicular relation to the other pair of said parallel panels and the edges of each of said panels being spaced from the edges of the adjacent panels and in contact with the interior face of said circular paper body, corner forming means arranged between the spaced edges of adjacent panels for forming chamfered corners on the concrete columns, and filler means between each of said panels and said circular tubular body for supporting said panels and transmitting internal pressure from the panels to the tubular body.

6. A concrete form adapted for use in molding square concrete columns comprising an outer, circular, tubular paper body, an inner, substantially square form arranged Within said outer, tubular paper body and contacting the outer tubular body at the corners of said inner form, and filler means between said inner form and said outer paper body for supporting the inner form and transmitting internal pressure from the inner form to the outer paper bod 7? A concrete form adapted for use in molding square concrete columns comprising an outer, unitary cylindrical paper body, an inner form arranged within said outer paper body and contacting said outer paper body at four equidistant points along the circumferential interior surface thereof, and filler means arranged between and fixed to the inner form and the outer paper body for supporting the inner form and transmitting internal pressure from the inner form to the outer body.

8. A concrete form adapted for use in molding a square concrete column comprising an outer, circular, tubular paper body, a substantially square inner form arranged within and fixed to said outer paper body and extending for the entire length thereof, said inner form contacting said outer paper body at four points along the circumferential interior surface thereof, and filler means arranged between and fixed to the inner form and the outer paper body at each of the open spaces between said contacting points and extending for the entire length of said inner form.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 7 Copenhaver May 4, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1295310 *Jul 6, 1918Feb 25, 1919Rudolph B HartmanMold for concrete columns.
US1658922 *Aug 6, 1925Feb 14, 1928Heath George BApparatus for making concrete poles
US1670339 *Aug 19, 1926May 22, 1928Butterworth Samuel DColumn form
US1756542 *May 21, 1927Apr 29, 1930Bernard Dowd EdmundForming means for composite columns and the like
US1771099 *Oct 24, 1928Jul 22, 1930Marco RighettoMachine for centrifugally casting concrete sleepers
US2050258 *Jul 18, 1934Aug 11, 1936Bemis Ind IncBuilding construction
US2677165 *Oct 27, 1950May 4, 1954Sonoco Products CoConcrete form and method of molding concrete columns therewith
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2975498 *Sep 16, 1957Mar 21, 1961Plattner Andrew JConcrete column mold
US2991533 *Apr 21, 1958Jul 11, 1961Sonoco Products CoForm for concrete columns
US3301926 *Apr 8, 1964Jan 31, 1967Gateway Erectors IncMethod of fabricating a self-braced concrete form
US3350049 *Oct 5, 1966Oct 31, 1967Gateway Erectors IncConcrete forms
US3672626 *Mar 6, 1970Jun 27, 1972Thornton JamesReusable forms for casting columns
US4767095 *Oct 19, 1987Aug 30, 1988Fitzgerald John MConcrete column form
US5229051 *Jun 27, 1991Jul 20, 1993Perma-Post International, Inc.Method for making sleeve encased concrete posts
US5675956 *May 29, 1996Oct 14, 1997Nevin; Jerome F.Post and pole construction using composite materials
US6247279Mar 24, 1999Jun 19, 2001University Of OttawaRetrofitting existing concrete columns by external prestressing
US6260816 *Feb 2, 1999Jul 17, 2001Jose Manuel Valero SalinasDiscardable formwork for columns
US7665259 *Dec 6, 2005Feb 23, 2010Korea National Housing CorporationBuilt-up rectangular steel column for filling concrete therein having L-shaped members and steel plates with curving projections and convex embossed portions
US7874540 *Jun 27, 2007Jan 25, 2011Sonoco Development, Inc.Concrete form for pouring non-round columns, and method of making same
US20130037691 *Feb 23, 2011Feb 14, 2013Mindor AsFormwork Column
WO1993014287A1 *Jan 8, 1993Jul 22, 1993Cosmo Patrick DiForm for casting building elements
WO1999049155A1 *Mar 23, 1999Sep 30, 1999Murat SaatciogluRetrofitting existing concrete columns by external prestressing
Classifications
U.S. Classification249/48, 249/134, 249/164, 249/61, 249/194
International ClassificationE04G13/00, E04G13/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04G13/02
European ClassificationE04G13/02