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Publication numberUS2874547 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1959
Filing dateApr 18, 1956
Priority dateApr 18, 1956
Publication numberUS 2874547 A, US 2874547A, US-A-2874547, US2874547 A, US2874547A
InventorsFiore Vincent J, Oscar Reich
Original AssigneeFiore
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pile driving point and ram for open end pipe piles and h-beam bearing piles
US 2874547 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24, 1959 v. J. FIORE x-:TAL 2,874,547

A PILE DRIVING POINT AND RAM FOR OPEN END PIPE Filed April 1s, 195e PILES AND H-BEAM BEARING PILES 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 NNW L 3 y.

INVENTOR` W m m n@ m .e MR@ f @MW .ns V10 Y B Fig. 6

Feb. 24, 1959 I v. J. FIORE ET AL 2,874,547 PILE DRIVING POINT ANO RAN POR OPEN ENO PIPE PILES ANO R-BEAM BEARING PILES Filed April 18. 195e 2 Sheets-Sheet 2' F z'g. Fig. l2

BY Vincent J Fibre Oscar Reich /TTORNEY' Vincent J.

United States Patent nien DRIVING roiNT AND RAM non vo1 1n`t1f3Nl1 `PIPE PILES. AND H-BEAM BEARING PILES,

Fiore and Oscar Reich, New York, N. Y.;

said'Reich assignor4 to said Fiore Appl'ieafienAPril 18,1 19.56, Serial N 0 579,011,

sfclaims. (Cl. s1-say breaker to clear the way of such obstructions, to prevent clogging of open-end pipes by large boulders and to protect the relatively weak ends of such piles from damage,

It is also an object of the invention to adopt this tip,

to closed end pipe piles and to mandrel driven shells similar to` the tip described in our patent application Serial No.` 554,245.v

Open-end pipe piles and H-beam bearing piles are generally used only where the intention is to drivepilesV to rock. The material in the open-end pipe piles is blown out after driving and the pile is,` inspected.l If the openend pipe pile is not on rock it can be driven down further unlessv it is damaged. The. difliculty in many cases, especially with piles 80 feet long` or longer, is` that on the way down to bedrock, layers of hardpan and boulders are generally encountered, especially inthe. region directly overlying rock so. that the piles become damaged because of such obstructions. Our tips or points have been designed to overcome these diiculties'. Open-end pipe piles are driven at the present time without any tip or point;v

in almost all instances.` Occasionally, a steel ring of some harder steel than the pipe itself is welded onto. theV pipe. Similar condition prevail with H-beam piles. This results in damaged piles, bent or doglegged. Such piles must be rejected resulting in great loss. In theycase of open-end pipe piles, large boulders wedge4 themselves intol the` pipe4 which are exceedingly difcult and ofttimes irn-` possible to dislodge or remove. In instances where attempts havek been made to remove such boulders, a great deal of timev is lost thus greatly increasing the cost. Under such conditions the steel ring weldedy to the end of the pipe is of no assistance whatever.

We have provided cross-blades on our tips or points so that'large boulders cannot enter the pipe while loose material, such as sand, gravel, clay and silt are permitted to pass upward through the pipe. The blades will disperse large boulders, will cut through dense materials and will prevent the pile from being hung up before reaching acceptable bearing material or bedroek. Piles heretofore used are hung up rather often where the resistance of the material, especially hardpan or decomposed rock is so large that no amount of Ydriving can` overcome it. Our tips will attach themselves to bedrock and assure proper seating ofthe pile and will also pro` tect pipe pile from collapsing or Crumpling.

With the Hbeam bearing pile, our tip will protect no inspection after driving islpossible.

2,874,547 Ratented eb.` 24,7 1859;

ICC.

' tains is blown out by Ycompressed airfas` heretofore stated, and the pipe is washed witha stream ofWater. The material around the tripl of the pile isalso washed'A oY leaving a base for concrete larger than Ithe diameter of the pile. This is a distinct advantage since it gives the pile a largerand rmer llold-n on the underlying rock and greater security against lateralmovement, In the case of shorter piles, where only occasional dilnculty is met, the tip may be attached to a smaller pipe fitting into the pipe pile andl used vas a ram oriispudv inside of the largerv pipe tov clear it of.,` wedged-in,v boulders or other materia1.

Our tips o r pointssave a great deal in cost since the cost of but one ruined pile diiven without protection of our point is many times the cost of a tip or Ipoint. It is,

therefore, evident that our tips or points not onlyrr savey a great deal in cost but also intime since a ruined pile must be corrected. .i v

For a fuller understanding ofl the nature and objects of the invention, reference ismade to. the following detailed description inv connection with the accompanying drawings in which;

Fig. 1 is a` side el-:vation view of a four blaeledu pile tip for an open-end pipe pile, partly in vertical section, theP pipe being seated within the collar of the tip;

Fig. 2 is a bottom view of` the point or tip. shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3l is a, sectional view taken. through line 3443 or Fig. 1;

'Fig- 4; isa partial seetienal view ef' the. end er. edge ef. the blade taken through 1ine4-4of- Fig.V l;

Fis- 5 is e Partiel Seetienal View Qf, ehieded end. or edge of a blade;

Fiss- 6, 7 and 8 are ter. views 0f two, three` and fue, bleded pile, tips for oren-end, pire, pile, tesrieetvely;

Fie.- 9 is e, vertical Seetieael partiel View of e mesiesl. pile tip whichV is seated within the end ot a pipe andi'can be used asa closed en d, pile tip;`

Fig. 9a is a vertical sectional partial view. of another mqdieed pue. up when' is seaedwiiln fue, emi. of a,

pipe endeen be used a, elesed. endpile tirA Fig. 10 is an isometric View, partially c ut away, of e meded feux bleded rile tip. ferrie with. H -beem beer'- ins piles. Showing the blades, used, ereseuse;

Fis- 11 iS. a ter View of. the point or tip Shown. in Fig. l0; and i Fig.` 12 is a top View of a 'modied point or tip showing the bladesused diagonally. p

Referring to Figs. l to 5 of the drawings, nurrle-ralA 20.. represents a four bladed pile driving tip or pointwfo); eren-end pire piles, mede preferably 0f east steel but may be made of other material, such als east iron, o r other metals or alloyed metals. 'l `h e upper end has a collar` 21, the inside wall 22, of which isfslightly taperedV out; wardly at its inner circumference. The circumferential shoulder 23 is adapted to receive the end 2 4 of an openend pipe pile 30. Below collarrZl there are four blades or cutters 25A, each blade being in the form o`f aboutV half a spear pointing downwardly.Y The distal blade end,` 26 is thicker than the upper blade end 21 at the collar 2&1, tapering gradually fromthe bottom or lisxtalend` to the upper blade venel 27. .The bladesv 25 are preferably of uniform size and the extreme edges28 of each blade extend outwardly beven@ the enfer .eireumferenee ,et the cellar ,2 1, Per e, feu inch pire, rile., we prefer to. here. a thickness. of about 2 inches et.' the bettem'z et4 the blade er et. the peint end @beet Iitlelt. in, thielsaess it the upper Dertien ef the blade.. 2.5 Where. it @este the, eelle'ZL YThereeler 211e pfeereblr ebeut oiierhelf. inch thick above the shoulder V23 and about l inch thick at its lower portion. Of course, the thickness of the tapering blades 25 and the collar 21 will vary depending upon the diameter of open-end pipe to be driven and the character of the metal used. The blade end 26 may be blunt as shown, or may be' pointed, as shown in Fig. 5. The outer edges `29 may be square as shown in Fig. 3 or rounded, as shown'in Fig. 4, or may be pointed, as shown in Fig. 5. The blades 25 also taper outwardly towards the vertical medial line, that is the blades 25 are somewhat thicker in the center than at the outer edges, as best shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

The collar 21 and blades 25 are preferably cast integrally. It is preferable to weld the pipe 30 to the tip 20 so that the tip or point 20 becomes an integral part of the pile. The tip or point 20 can also be readily adapted for closed end piles by casting or welding a horizontal steel plate 36 or 38 upon shoulder 23.

The tapered inner wall 22 permits the end of pipe 30 to slide into the top opening until the end 24 of pipe 30 is properly seated. It is evident that when the tip or point 20 is fastened or welded to smaller diameter pipe than the pipe to be driven, and the pipe to which the tip is fastened is of extra heavy wall thickness, such combination may then be readily used as a ram or spud, inside of larger pipe driven as a pile and can then be extracted.

Referring to Figs. 6, 7 and 8, these driving tips or points are similar in all respects to the four bladed pile driving tip of Figs. 1 to 5, except that such tips are for two, three and five blades, respectively. Such tips or points are used in the same manner as the tip shown and described in Figs. l to 5.

Referring to Fig. 9, this tip 31 is also very much like the tip of Figs. l to 5, except that the collar 32 has an outer circumferential shoulder 33 with the upper collar portion 35 tapered inwardly to fit inside the pipe pile 34 so that the pipe 34 can slide down the tapered collar portion 35 to the shoulder 33 and be somewhat wedged therein because of the taper. The shoulder 33 is wide enough to accommodate the thickness of pipe 34. It is then preferable to weld the collar 32 and the pipe 34 together to insure that the tip will not become dislodged from the pipe when it is driven into the ground.

The tip 31 shown in Fig. 9 may be used for both openend pipe pile or closed end piles since tip 31 has an integrally formed plate 36 closingthe vertical opening of the collar 32. When used for open-end pipe piles, plate 36 is omitted in casting.

Fig. 9a shows a modification of Fig. 9 in that an inner shoulder 37 is employed to receive a steel plate 38. The wall 39 is somewhat thickened below the plate 38 creating the shoulder 37. The plate 38 may be inserted when desired for use with a closed end pile and may be welded to the tip as well as to the end of the pipe pile. It is possible to use the tips of Figs. 9 and 9a for both open-end pipe pile and closed end piles.

Referring to Fig. 10, numeral 40 represents a four bladed pile driving tip for an H-beam bearing pile 44. This tip is in most respects like the tip of Fig. 1 and the same description would apply, except that-the collar 41 is substantially square. This inside wall 42 is also slightly tapered outwardly. The blades 45 extend upwardly within the collar 41 to the shoulder 43 so that the lower end of the H-beam pile rests upon the shoulder 43 and the top edge 50 of the blades 45. In Fig.- ll, the blades 45 are erosswise and in the modification, Fig. 12, the blades are positioned diagonally to the frame or collar 41. The tapered inner wall 42 permits the lower end of the H-beam pile to slide into the top opening until it is properly seated. It is preferable to weld the tip 40 to the end of the H-beam pile so that the tip 40 becomes an integral part of the pile. Of course, it is evident that two, three and live or more blades can also be used with the substantially square collar 41 in a manner similar to Figs. 6, 7 and 8, except for the square collar. The

4 blades 45 may also have the rounded edges of Fig. 4 or the pointed edges of Fig. 5.

It is also obvious that the cross blades need not necessarily be of the same width.

It should be noted that in all the forms shown the tip will disperse large boulders and permit looser material to pass through and upward (except for the closed forms when plates like 36, 38 are used); will clear the way of obstructions for the pile; will cut through dense material and prevent hung up piles; the cross members will stop large boulders from entering pipe and thus prevent clogging of pipe; will protect pipe or H-beam from collapsing or crumpling; will attach itself to bedrock and assure proper seating; will result in large savings and when material in pile is cleaned out a broader base is assured for concrete around the tip which can bc adapted both to open-end pipe piles or to shells of various kinds.

The driving points for the open-end pipe pile and the H-beam bearing pile can be made to accommodate the different standard sizes of pipe and H-beams now being used, and it is evident that the sizes and thicknesses of the points will vary with the size of the pipe and H-beams used and the character of the metal used for the points.

It is obvious that various changes and modifications may be made in the details of construction and arrangements of parts' without departing from the general spirit of the invention.

We claim:

l. A pile driving point having a tip for an open-end pipe pile, said point comprising a .hollow collar open at opposite ends and a multiplicity of identical blades disposed substantially parallel to the axis of said collar, said collar having an upper portion and a shoulder for seating said pipe pile, said blades intersecting one another below said shoulder, said blades being integral and angularly disposed to one another and having their extreme opposed edges sloping from the lower outer edge of said collar outwardly and downwardly to an outer edge beyond the outer wall of said collar and thentapering downwardly and inwardly toward said tip of said driving point, the length of said blades above said extreme outer edge being substantially less in length than the length of said blades below said extreme outer edge, each of said blades being symmetrical about a radial axis and being uniformly thickened from its upper to its lower end, said blades terminating in a blunt point.

2. The pile driving point set forth in claim l, wherein said shoulder extends around the inner circumference of said collar and said upper portion tapers upwardly and outwardly above said shoulder.

3. The pile driving point set forth in claim l, wherein said collar extends around the outer circumference of said shoulder and said upper portion tapers inwardly and upwardly above said shoulder.

4. A pile driving point andram having a tip for open or closed end pile, said point comprising a hollow collar and a multiplicity of identical blades disposed substantially parallel to the axis of said collar, said collar having an outer circumferential shoulder for seating an open end pile and a bottom for seating a closed end pile, said blades intersecting one another below said shoulder, said blades being integral and angularly disposed to one another and having their extreme opposed edges sloping A5. A pile driving point having a tip for H-beam bearing 5 pile, said point comprising a hollow collar open at opposite ends and a multiplicity of identical blades disposed substantially parallel to the axis of said collar, each of said blades being symmetrical about a radial axis, said collar being substantially square and having an upper portion and a shoulder for seating said H-beam bearing pile, said blades intersecting one another below said shoulder, said blades being integral and angularly disposed to one another and having their extreme edges sloping from the lower outer edge of said collar outwardly and down- `wardly to an outer edge beyond the outer Wall of said bollar. and thentapering downwardly and inwardly toward said tip of said driving point, the length of said blades above said extreme outer edge being substantially less in length than the length of said blades below said extreme Outer edge, each of said blades being symmetrical about a radial axis and being uniformly thickened from its'upper to its lower end, said blades terminating in a blunt point.

6. The pile driving point set forth in claim 5, wherein said shoulder extends around the inner walls of said co1- lar and said upper portion tapers upwardly and outwardly above said shoulder.

7. The pile driving point set forth in claim 6 in which said blades are parallel to the edges of said collar.

8. The pile driving point set forth in claim 6 in which said blades are disposed to coincide with the diagonals of said collar.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 226,237 Maclay Apr. 6, 1880 228,467 Maclay June 8, 1880 299,419 Peary May 27, 1884 369,500 Brookbank Sept. 6, 1887 661,798 Glossop Nov. 13, 1900 973,887 Steinmetz Oct. 25, 1910 1,960,888 Atwell May 29, 1934 2,562,860 Cobi July 31, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 4,648 Netherlands 1920

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2978874 *Apr 6, 1959Apr 11, 1961Dougherty J JSplicer clip unit for h-beam bearing piles
US3119635 *Jan 23, 1962Jan 28, 1964Albert Pipe Supply Co IncH-beam pile connectors
US3123978 *Jan 14, 1960Mar 10, 1964 H-beam pile cutter and combination with h-beam pile
US3266255 *Dec 10, 1963Aug 16, 1966Dougherty John JDrive-fit transition sleeve
US3333428 *Oct 19, 1964Aug 1, 1967Dougherty John JOpen end cutting shoe
US3333430 *Apr 27, 1965Aug 1, 1967Dougherty John JBoot for pipe pile
US3599380 *Dec 31, 1968Aug 17, 1971Menzi Ag ErnstSoil-engaging element for a construction machine
US3986369 *Aug 13, 1975Oct 19, 1976Fredric RuscheComposite pile structure and method
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US4657441 *Oct 15, 1984Apr 14, 1987Hsa, Inc.Penetration conductor pipe drive shoe
US5797704 *Apr 21, 1997Aug 25, 1998Collins; James S.Pier foundation and method of installation
US6461084 *Jun 4, 1999Oct 8, 2002Ian Matear StuartPost anchor
US7104732 *Jun 21, 2004Sep 12, 2006Subterranean Ltd.Pile installation method with downhole hammer
US8506206 *Oct 8, 2010Aug 13, 20139267-9075 Quebec Inc.Composite pile formed of interconnected rigid hollow tubes
US8596964Jul 13, 2007Dec 3, 2013Openhydro Group LimitedTurbines having a debris release chute
US8690526Dec 14, 2009Apr 8, 2014Openhydro Ip LimitedHydroelectric turbine with passive braking
US8754540Feb 5, 2009Jun 17, 2014James IvesHydroelectric turbine with floating rotor
US8784005Apr 16, 2009Jul 22, 2014Openhydro Group LimitedTurbine installation method
US8864439Jul 13, 2007Oct 21, 2014Openhydro Ip LimitedTidal flow hydroelectric turbine
US8872371Dec 17, 2009Oct 28, 2014OpenHydro IP LimintedEnhanced method of controlling the output of a hydroelectric turbine generator
US8933598Sep 29, 2010Jan 13, 2015Openhydro Ip LimitedHydroelectric turbine with coil cooling
US9054512Dec 17, 2009Jun 9, 2015Openhydro Ip LimitedMethod of installing a hydroelectric turbine generator
US9157207May 14, 2013Oct 13, 2015Brooke Erin DesantisComposite pile formed of interconnected rigid hollow tubes
US9234492Dec 22, 2011Jan 12, 2016Openhydro Ip LimitedHydroelectric turbine testing method
US9236725Sep 29, 2010Jan 12, 2016Openhydro Ip LimitedHydroelectric turbine cabling system
US9284709Apr 11, 2008Mar 15, 2016Openhydro Group LimitedMethod of installing a hydroelectric turbine
US20050281625 *Jun 21, 2004Dec 22, 2005Mignacca Peter JPile installation method with downhole hammer
US20100068037 *Jul 13, 2007Mar 18, 2010Openhydro Group LimitedTurbines having a debris release chute
US20100232885 *Apr 11, 2008Sep 16, 2010Openhydro Group LimitedMethod of installing a hydroelectric turbine
US20110088253 *Apr 16, 2009Apr 21, 2011Openhydro Group Limitedturbine installation method
US20110110770 *Apr 22, 2009May 12, 2011Openhydro Group LimitedHydroelectric turbine having a magnetic bearing
US20110298216 *Dec 14, 2009Dec 8, 2011Openhydro Ip LimitedMethod of securing a hydroelectric turbine at a deployment site
US20120087741 *Apr 12, 2012Alain DesmeulesComposite pile formed of interconnected rigid hollow tubes
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/254, 175/414, 52/165
International ClassificationE02D5/00, E02D5/72
Cooperative ClassificationE02D5/72
European ClassificationE02D5/72