Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2874550 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1959
Filing dateMay 19, 1955
Priority dateMay 19, 1955
Publication numberUS 2874550 A, US 2874550A, US-A-2874550, US2874550 A, US2874550A
InventorsMusson Harry Robert
Original AssigneeKeeprite Products Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Winter control valve arrangement in refrigerating system
US 2874550 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. R; MussoN 2,874,550 'INTER CQNTROL VALVE ARRANGEMENT. IN RHRZIIGBRATING SYSTEM 1mmv lay 19. 195s nl. 24,J 1959 l WINTER CONTROL VALVE ARRANGEMENT IN REFRIGERATING SYSTEM Harry Robert Masson, Brantford, Ontario, Canada,

asslgnor tol Keeprite Products Limited, Brantford, Ontario, Canada Application May 19, 1955, Serial No. 509,600 2 Claims. Cl. 62-196) This invention relates to refrigeration systems and more particularly to means to assure eciency of systems or arrangements in-which the condenser, particug larly of the air-cooled type, is located out of doors and 4subject to low ambient temperatures as at geographical points where winters are severe.

A specific object of the invention is to prevent undesirable reduction in the pressure of the refrigerant at the expansion valve. v

Another object of the invention is to reduce or prevent the formation of vapor in the pipe line between the receiver and the evaporator because of any undesirable reduction in pressure caused by too large cooling or radiating surfaces of the condenser exposed to low outside temperature. Another object of the invention is to control the discharge or flow of refrigerant liquid from the condenser to receiver thus maintaining control over the amount of condensing surface in the condenser (being a function of the degree of flooding of the condenser).

These and other objects ofv this invention, audits advantages, will be apparent and may be better understoodv by referring to the. following description of the preferred embodiment of the invention.

Referring now by numerals to the drawing, a compressor 10 of any conventional type has its discharge end connected by a conduit 11 to an air-cooled condenser 12.

v The discharge end of the condenser in turn is connected by conduit 13with the inlet of a receiver 14. A con# duit 15 between the conduits 11 and 13 serves to by-pass the condenser, being an equalizer line connecting the compressor discharge to the receiver inlet. Interposed in the length of the conduit 15 is a valve 16.

A conventional evaporator 17 is connected to the intake of the compressor as by a conduit 19. The discharge end of the receiver is connected to a conventional expansion valve associated with the evaporator, as by a conduit 21. l

Interposed in the length of the conduit 13 is a pressureresponsive valve 18, mechanically opening to allow the ow of liquid 'refrigerant from the condenser to the receiver or mechanically closing to stop the flow until the level of the liquid refrigerant riss in the condenser to reduce the effective cooling surfaces of the condenser to the' extent required for the proper rate of condensation required to maintain the predetermined minimum pressure necessary for proper operation.

Because the maintenance of this minimum pressure is` of great importance, vthe function of this valve 18 is controlled by pressure-sensitive means depending on the v2,374,550 Patented Feb. 24, 1959 pressure at any convenient point of the system. For convenience and simplicity of installation, the pressure at the point where the valve 18 is located can be used4 for control purposes.

Pressure controlled valves are widely used and their design is common knowledge; therefore, no specific strucf ture need be mentioned.

From the above disclosure, it will be seen that the re,

frigeration system as disclosed has special advantagesin use and operation and will provide safe and simple means to facilitate proper'operation with air cooled condensers exposed to low ambient temperatures.

What I claim is:

l. In a refrigerating system including interconnectedcompressor, condenser, receiver, expansion valve and evaporator wherein the .condenser is of the air cooled type subject to low ambient temperatures, means for maintaining control over the amount of condensing surface in the condenser and the degree of llooding of the condenser by controlling the flow of refrigerant liquid from the condenser to the receiver, said means compris'- ing a liquid conduit from the condenser to the receiver and a pressure controlled valve'n said conduit, said valve being responsive to a selected minimum pressure of thel refrigerant at the location of the valve to mechanically close and stop the flow of liquid refrigerant through said conduit until the level of liquid refrigerant rises in the condenser to reduce the effective cooling surfaces thereof, said valve being the only means in the entire system,

other than the expansion valve, for controlling the ooding of the condenser and varying the'effective cooling surface thereof.

2. In a refrigerating system including interconnected compressor, condenser, receiver, expansion valve and..

ing a liquid conduit from the condenser to the receiver and a pressure controlled valve in said conduit, said valve being responsive to a selected minimum pressure of the refrigerant at the location of the valve to mechanically close and sto'p the ow of liquid refrigerant through said conduit until the level of liquid refrigerant rises in the condenser to reduce the effective cooling surfaces thereof, said valve being the only means in the .entire system, other than the expansion valve, for controlling the ooding of the condenser and varying the effective cooling surface thereof, and said condenser being po.`

sitioned above the receiver and said valve being located below the condenser and closely adjacent the receiver.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PA'I'ENTS 2,434,593 Schulz et al. Jan. 13, 1948 2,564,310 Nussbaum et al Aug. 14, 1951 2,621,051 Kramer Dec. 9, 1952 2,621,487 Warren D ec. 16, 1952 2,706,386 Stoner Apr. 19, 1955 2,710,507' Ashley .v--- June 14, 1955 2,761,287 Malkot Sept. 4, 1956y

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2434593 *Feb 2, 1946Jan 13, 1948Carrier CorpRefrigeration system including a load control apparatus
US2564310 *Oct 5, 1950Aug 14, 1951Kramer Trenton CoMeans for controlling the head pressure in refrigerating systems
US2621051 *Nov 13, 1948Dec 9, 1952Kramer Trenton CoValve control for the head pressure in refrigerating systems
US2621487 *Dec 12, 1951Dec 16, 1952Warren George HSafety control means for refrigerating systems
US2706386 *Jan 21, 1953Apr 19, 1955Stoner Charles WardExpansion chamber for condenser coils of a refrigerating system
US2710507 *Sep 30, 1952Jun 14, 1955Carrier CorpMethod and apparatus for defrosting the evaporator of a refrigeration system
US2761287 *Jun 25, 1953Sep 4, 1956Kramer Trenton CoMeans for controlling high side pressure in refrigerating systems
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2954681 *Jan 29, 1958Oct 4, 1960Penn ControlsRefrigeration system
US2963877 *Jan 24, 1957Dec 13, 1960Kramer Trenton CoMeans for controlling high side pressure in refrigerating systems
US2986899 *Dec 23, 1957Jun 6, 1961Alco Valve CoSystem for maintaining pressure in refrigeration systems
US3091944 *Oct 31, 1961Jun 4, 1963Trane CoHeat pump system
US3149475 *May 11, 1962Sep 22, 1964Sporlan Valve CoHead pressure control for refrigeration system
US3150498 *Mar 8, 1962Sep 29, 1964Ray Winther CompanyMethod and apparatus for defrosting refrigeration systems
US3324673 *Jul 19, 1965Jun 13, 1967Universal American CorpRefrigeration system with check valve
US3358469 *Aug 24, 1965Dec 19, 1967Lester K QuickRefrigeration system condenser arrangement
US3905202 *Jan 8, 1974Sep 16, 1975Emhart CorpRefrigeration system
US3939668 *Nov 21, 1974Feb 24, 1976Morris Herman HBalanced liquid level head pressure control systems
US4430866 *Sep 7, 1982Feb 14, 1984Emhart Industries, Inc.Pressure control means for refrigeration systems of the energy conservation type
US4457138 *Jan 29, 1982Jul 3, 1984Tyler Refrigeration CorporationRefrigeration system with receiver bypass
US5692387 *Apr 28, 1995Dec 2, 1997Altech Controls CorporationLiquid cooling of discharge gas
US7559207Jun 23, 2005Jul 14, 2009York International CorporationMethod for refrigerant pressure control in refrigeration systems
US7845185Jun 23, 2005Dec 7, 2010York International CorporationMethod and apparatus for dehumidification
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/196.4, 62/498, 62/117, 62/DIG.170
International ClassificationF25B49/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S62/17, F25B49/027, F25B2500/31
European ClassificationF25B49/02D