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Publication numberUS2874627 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1959
Filing dateSep 3, 1954
Priority dateSep 3, 1954
Publication numberUS 2874627 A, US 2874627A, US-A-2874627, US2874627 A, US2874627A
InventorsFrancis L Simmonds
Original AssigneeFrancis L Simmonds
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exhaust system
US 2874627 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24, 1959 F. l.. SIMMONDS 2,874,627

EXHAUST SYSTEM v Filed Sept. 5. 1954 United States Patent EXHAUST SYSTEM Francis L. Simmonds, De Kalb, Ill. Application September 3, 1954, Serial No. 454,153 7 Claims. (Cl. 98115)l The present invention relates to a novel exhaust system and more particularly, to a novel system for exhausting grease-laden or otherwise contaminated air from rooms such as kitchens.

As is well known, the air in kitchens often becomes contaminated with grease and smoke and the like and unless some provision is made for exhausting the air from the kitchen, the contaminating material in the air collects on the kitchen walls and ceiling. While this problem is present in domestic kitchens, it is particularly acute in commercial kitchens wherein large amounts of fried foods are prepared. In order to exhaust such contaminated air from kitchens, it has heretofore been the general practice to mount an exhaust fan in a wall opening and blow the air directly to the exterior of the building and in some installations, a large canopy has been positioned over the cooking stove and over the exhaust fan toV restrain smoke and grease-laden air rising from the stove from circulating throughout the entire kitchen. However, such prior installations have ynot been entirely satisfactory since the air blown directly through the wall opening often contacts the exterior surface of the building so that grease and the like are deposited on the exterior surface. In addition, grease and the like collects rapidly onthe interior surfaces of the canopies used in heretofore known installations so that frequent cleaning is necessary.

In prior installations using canopies, it has often been necessary to operate the exhaust fan at a high speed in order to prevent contaminated air from escaping from under the canopy and depositing contaminatedmaterial such as grease and the like on the exterior surface of the canopy or the walls of the kitchen. However, when the exhaust fan is operated at a high speed, an undesirable draft may be created throughout the entire kitchen or even throughout the entire building, which draft may interfere with the proper operation of other air-treating apparatus in the building. For example, it has been found that if a furnace is located in the building, the draft created by the exhaust fan may set up a reverse draft in the chimney of the furnace and thereby prevent proper operation o f the furnace. Also the draftset up by the exhaust fait may interfere with the proper'operation of an air-conditioning equipment within the'building.

It isapriinary object of the`present linvention `to provide a riovelsystem for exhausting airfrom kitchens and the like to the, exterior of aibuilding,`which system is constructed Vso as to Vprevent any contaminating materials in '-the air'fro'rnbeing deposited onthe exterior surface of the building.

Another object ofthe Vlinreseritiinvention is to provide anoyel4 system for exhausting contaminated air from a kitchen "or the like'to the exterior of the building wherein 'substantial portions of the contaminated materials ar'e re- Ymovedlfrom the airbefore the airis discharged f rom thc Vsystem whereby to reduce any possibility of the contami- Ynating'materials being deposited onn the surface of the building. 1 i Y {Another important object kof the present invention is to 2,874,627 Patented Feb. 2,4, 195,9

ICC,

.provide a novel air exhaust system including an exhaust fan and a canopy, which system is constructed soas to reduce substantially the rate at which contaminating materials are deposited on the interior surfaces of the canopy.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel system of the above described type which is of simple and economical construction and which may be readily disassembled for cleaning purposes and the like.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel air exhaust system wherein an exhaust fan may be operated at high speeds for preventing contaminated air from circulating from a stove or the like throughout the kitchen or room without creating an undesirable draft that will interfere withthe proper operation of other ap-v paratus such as a furnace or air conditioning equipment that may he located within the building.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. l is a vertical sectional view of an exhaust system embodying the principles of this invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken along line 2--2 in Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a cross sectional view taken along line 3-3 in Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating portions of the novel system `in position to be assembled together; and

Fig. 5 is a cross sectional view of a slightly modified discharge end section of the exhaust system of this invention. i

Referring now more specifically to the drawings wherein like parts are designated by the same numerals throughout the various figures, an exhaust system 10 embodying the principles of the present invention is shown in Fig. l

and includes a large canopy 12 made of sheet metal or wall 26 to the exterior of the building. Preferably, a sheet metal panel 21 having a lower trough portion 23 is mounted on the wall 26 behind the stove for collecting any grease or the like which may splatter from the stove.

The canopy 12 which is preferably made of sheet metal may be of any known construction and may be mounted to the Wall 26 by a suitable known means such as bolts or screws, not shown, and, therefore, the canopy need not be further described in detail. In the past, it has been the practice to mount the exhaust fan within the wall opening but this arrangement has permitted the contaminated air drawn beneath the canopy'to swirl around and come into intimate contact with the interior surface of the canopy whereby air contaminating materials such as grease and smoke are deposited on the canopy at a rapid rate. In accordance with the present invention, the rate at which the contaminating materials are deposited on the interior Vof the canopy 12 is substantially reduced by forming the duct means 14 so that it includes a tube 28 whichv extends from the wall 26 welltoward the centralportion of thecanopy. The tube 28 is provided with an annular ilange 30 for abutting against the wall 26 and is secured to the wall by means of a plurality of screwsr32 extending through the flange and into the wall. The exhaust fan 16 is mounted within the tube 28 by any suitable means such as a plurality of brackets 34 and it should be noted that the fan is spaced well within the inlet end of the tube. Wththis arrangement the tube 28, which has a diameter substantially less than the cross sectional dimensions of the canopy, provides for a Venturi-like action adjacent the mid-portion of the canopy whereby the velocity of the air moving through the canopy is rapidly increased as the air moves toward and into the tube. It has been found that this action substantially reduces swirling of the air within and against the interior surfaces of the canopy and the wall 26 and the larger portion of the air tiows in the manner indicated by the arrows so as to reduce the rate at which contaminating material such as grease and smoke are deposited on the canopy or the wall 26.

The fan 16 may be of any known variable speed type and need not be described in detail. However, suitable switch means, not shown, should be provided for controlling the operation and speed of the fan as will b e understood. The electric motor of the fan is preferably air cooled and in order to prevent contamination of the fan motor,V a cooling air inlet tube 36 is provided which extends from the motor through a suitable opening in the duct means 14 and through the wall 26 to the exterior of the building. A cooling air outlet tube 38 is provided which extends from the fan motor housing through the duct means 14 and to any desired point outside of the canopy 12.

The duct means 14 also includes a sheet material liner 40 extending through the wall 26 and in order to prevent deposits of grease and the like from building up on the exterior surface of the wall 26, the duct means 18 is mounted in communication with the liner 40. It should be noted that the liner 40 extends into the duct means 18 as at 43 in order to insure against the escape of contaminated air between the inlet end of the duct means 18 and the wall 26. The duct means 18 includes an elbow 42 made of sheet metal or any other suitable material, which elbow has its inlet end secured against the wall 26 and its outlet end directed downwardly along the wall. The inlet end of the elbow is provided with a flange 44 through which a plurality of screws 46 and the like are passed for securing the elbow to the wall. It should be noted that the cross sectional dimensions of the elbow 18 are considerably larger than the diameter of the inlet tube-28 and the liner 40 so that the air passing into the elbow may expand and undesirable back pressure is avoided. This arrangement permits more efcient operation of the exhaust fan than heretofore known installations which include gravity biased shutters at the discharge side of the wall opening, which shutters must be forced open by the air whereby they create considerable back pressure which reduces the efficiency of the fan. The duct means 18 also includes one or more sections 48 and 50 depending from the lower end of the elbow. The section 48 is detachably connected to the elbow by means of a plurality of hook members 52 which are adapted to engage over studs 54. The section 50 is similarly attached to the lower end of the section 40 by hook members 56 and studs 58. It will be appreciated that any other desired means may be provided for detachably connecting the various sections of the duct means 18 together. The

lowermost section of the ductmeans 18, which in the embodiment shown is the section 50, has its bottom end closed by a receptacle 60 made of sheet metal or any other desired material, which receptacle is also detachably connected to the section by means of hook members 62 and studs 64 or any other desired means.

In addition, the lowermost section or the section 50 is provided with lateral air outlet openings 66, 68 and 70, which openings are preferably covered with metal screen or hardware cloth panels 72, 74 and 76. It should be noted that the rear wall 78 of the section 50, or in other words, the wall adjacent the wall 2,6 of the building is imperforate. Therefore, the air discharged from the section 50 is not directed toward the building or the wall 26. In addition, outwardly flared baffle members 80 and 82 extrend from the rear wall 78 of thersection 50 for directing the discharged air away from the buildllg- With this structure, the exhausted air is prevented from contacting the exterior surface of the building wall whereby to pre# vent deposits of grease and the like from accumulating on the building wall.

In order to further reduce any possibility of contaminating material in the air from contacting the exterior surface of the building wall, means is provided in the duct means 18 for removing substantial portions of the contaminating material from the air before the air is ultimately discharged. This means includes a plurality of sheet metal baffles 86 removably fixed within the elbow section 42 on brackets or the like 88. These baffles are directed downwardly across the path of the air entering the elbow in the manner shown so that the air is brought into intimate contact with the baffles. As the air contacts the baies 86, grease and the like condenses from the air and is deposited on the baffles. As the grease builds up on the baffles, it drains therefrom and drops into the container 60 at the lower end of the duct means. It should also'be noted that the lower ends of the elbow section 42, the section 48 and the section 50 are respectively provided with inwardly directed funnel portions 90, 92 and 94, which funnel portions extend into the next lower section and thereby prevent any grease or the like from escaping between the junctions of sections. The funnel portions also serve to direct any grease or the like running down the walls of the various sections toward the interior of the duct means so that grease dropping from the funnel portions falls directly into the receptacle 60. It has been found that the bafe members 86 and the funnel portions -of duct means 18 are effective for removing 'enough grease or other contaminating materials from the air for most installations. However, for some installations wherein the air is unusually heavily contaminated, it has been found desirable to provide filter units over the discharge openings in the section 50. Thus, as shown in Fig. 5, filter units 96 which may be made of any suitable material such as fiberglass or the like are placed over the discharge openings and may be retained in position by suitable bracket means 98 or the like.

As mentioned above, the exhaust fan should be operated at a speed sufficient to prevent any contaminated air from escaping around the canopy 12 and in installations heretofore in use, this has sometimes created an undesirable draft which interferes with the operation of furnaces or air conditioners. In accordance with the present invention, the possibility of the creation of such an undesirable draft has been eliminated by providing an air inlet duct 100 extending from the outside of the building through the wall 26 adjacent the lioor of the kitchen and beneath the fan. The passage of air through the inlet duct 100 may be controlled by gravity biased shutters 102 or suitable means, not shown, may be provided for positively positioning the shutters in the desired manner for controlling the How of air. Preferably, a screen 104 is provided across the inlet end of the duct 100 to prevent insects or rodents from gaining access to the kitchen. With the duct 100 and the shutters 102, it will be appreciated that the circulation of air through the exhaust system of this invention will be from the duct 100 past the stove and then into the canopy whereby undesirable drafts in the remaining portions of the kitchen or throughout the building are eliminated.

From the above. description, it is seen that the present invention has provided a novel exhaust system which is fully capable of accomplishing the objects heretofore set forth. More specifically, it is seen that the present inventiony has provided an exhaust system wherein the air is directed in a manner so as to reduce the rate of coutamination of the canopygand also to eliminate contamination of the exterior surface of the building. Further more, it is, seen that withfthe novel exhaust system of the present invention, the exhaust fan may be operated more eiciently and at a higher speed so as to prevent contaminated .air from escaping around. the canopy' With- '5 out creating undesirable drafts throughout the building. While for the purpose of illustrating the present invention only, one exhaust fan and its associated duct means has been illustrated, it will be appreciated that in many commercial kitchens, a number of stoves and long canopies are provided so that a plurality of exhaust fans and associated duct means should be used. It has been found that for optimum results, one exhaust fan and its associated duct means should be placed at eight or nine foot intervals along the canopy in commercial installations.

While the preferred embodiment of the present invention has been shown and described herein, it is obvious that many structural details may be changed without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

The invention is claimed as follows:

l. A system for exhausting contaminated air from a room or the like comprising duct means extending from a point within a room through a wall to the exterior of the room, fan means disposed within the duct means for moving air from the room through the duct means, additional duct means communicating with thev outlet end of said rst mentioned duct means and disposed for extending downwardly therefrom adjacent an exterior surface of said wall, receptacle means connected with and substantially closing a lower end portion of said last mentioned duct means for receiving contaminating material from the air being exhausted, said last mentioned duct means having lateral air outlet meansV adjacent to and above said receptacle means, and bae means associated with said last mentioned duct means for directing air emerging from said outlet means in a predetermined manner away from said wall.

2. An exhaust system, as defined in claim 1, which includes canopy means disposed over at least a part of said iirst mentioned duct means, and wherein said irst mentioned duct means has an inlet end disposed well within said canopy means and substantially spaced from interior surfaces of said canopy means whereby to direct air being exhausted in a manner to reduce contact with said canopy means.

3. An exhaust system, as defined in claim l, which includes generally downwardly extending baille means in said second mentioned duct means disposed for intimate contact for aii being exhausted and having lower end means spaced from interior surfaces of said second mentioned duct means and in generally vertical alignment with said receptacle means for removing contaminating material from the air and directing contaminating material so that it will drop into said receptacle means. f

4. An exhaust system, as dened in claim 1, whic includes air inlet means extending from the exterior of the room and opening `into the room substantially beneath and aligned with said rst mentioned duct means so that air entering through said inlet means may be means in order to eliminate the application of the suction to the room or other portions of the building of which the room is a part.

5. A system for exhausting contaminated air to the exterior of a building comprising duct means for extending between the interior and the exterior of the building, fan means for moving air through said duct means, additional duct means mountable in communication with said rst mentioned duct means for extending downwardly and along the exterior of the wall of a building, said last mentioned duct means including a plurality of sections, quick release means detachably connecting said sections, the lowermost of said sections having a closed bottom providing a receptacle, certain of said sections including an inwardly extending lower end portion projecting int-o an adjacent lower section and providing bafe means for directing air contaminating material toward said receptacle, the air-contaminating material thereby being kept away from the walls of said additional duct means, said last mentioned duct means having lateral air outlet opening means adjacent a lower end thereof and above said receptacle, and means associated with the lower end of said last mentioned duct means for directing air emerging from said outlet opening means away from the exterior wall of the building.

6. An exhaust system, as defined in claim 5, wherein said second mentioned duct means has an imperforate portion adjacent the exterior wall of the building, said air outlet opening means being disposed in other portions of said second mentioned duct means, and wherein said means for directing air emerging from said outlet opening means away from the exterior Wall of the building includes bafe members extending from opposite sides of said imperforate duct means portion.

7. An exhaust system, as deiined in claim 6, which includes filter means disposed across said air outlet opening means.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 640,484 Nelson Jan. 2, 1900 1,553,973 Ballon Sept. 15, 1925 1,568,532 Riesner Jan. 5, 1926 1,710,586 McCrory Apr. 23, 1929 1,885,016 Ryan Oct. 25, 1932 2,034,995 Sibley 5.---- Mar. 24, 1936 2,226,641 Sonntag Dec. 31, 1940 2,392,038 Gaylord Jan. 1, 1946 2,393,957 Baumgartner Feb. 5, 1946 V2,539,344 Garraway Jan. 23, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 591,169 GreatBritain i-- Aug. 8, 1947

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3285154 *Feb 24, 1964Nov 15, 1966Henry S Drive In IncPositive direct relief means for exhaust systems
US3292525 *Sep 13, 1965Dec 20, 1966Donald D JensenProtective air curtain for cooking area
US3368474 *Nov 9, 1966Feb 13, 1968Nashua Wood Products IncAir venting system
US3396651 *Jan 20, 1967Aug 13, 1968Mitsubishi Electric CorpKitchen ventilating device
US3400649 *Jan 26, 1967Sep 10, 1968Donald D. JensenVentilating system including fume removal means
US3457850 *Dec 11, 1967Jul 29, 1969Elster S Air ConditioningAir curtain ventilator
US3585919 *Apr 30, 1969Jun 22, 1971Aerodyne Mfg IncFluid handling system and method
US3585920 *Jun 16, 1969Jun 22, 1971Jensen Ind IncAdjustable outlet for ventilating range hood
US4283209 *Feb 6, 1979Aug 11, 1981Markus SchmalhoferSeparator for separating out particles of fatty substances from a gas current, more specifically from waste air from kitchens, and a waste air duct for the separator
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US4825848 *Mar 8, 1988May 2, 1989Macias Paul CExhaust system for cooking appliances
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US4887588 *Dec 27, 1988Dec 19, 1989Terry RialGrease absorption box for roof use
US5421320 *May 27, 1994Jun 6, 1995Ldi Mfg. Co., Inc.Conveyor oven exhaust system
US5814115 *Dec 27, 1996Sep 29, 1998Allen; DarrylGrease filter for exhaust systems in commercial food preparation environments
US8087491 *Jan 8, 2010Jan 3, 2012General Electric CompanyVane type silencers in elbow for gas turbine
US8230967 *Dec 21, 2011Jul 31, 2012General Electric CompanyVane type silencers in elbow for gas turbine
US20070135031 *Nov 21, 2006Jun 14, 2007Nicholas VlamisExhaust assembly with grease collector
US20110168482 *Jan 8, 2010Jul 14, 2011Laxmikant MerchantVane type silencers in elbow for gas turbine
US20120125709 *Dec 21, 2011May 24, 2012General Electric CompanyVane type silencers in elbow for gas turbine
EP0007385A1 *Mar 2, 1979Feb 6, 1980Markus SchmalhoferFilter for filtering greasy particles from a gaseous stream, particularly polluted kitchen air, and expelling duct therefor
WO1995033160A1 *May 25, 1995Dec 7, 1995Ldi Mfg Co IncConveyor oven exhaust system
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/299.00D, 55/DIG.360, 126/299.00R
International ClassificationF24F13/08, F24C15/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S55/36, F24F13/08, F24C15/20
European ClassificationF24F13/08, F24C15/20