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Publication numberUS2874835 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1959
Filing dateDec 1, 1958
Priority dateDec 1, 1958
Publication numberUS 2874835 A, US 2874835A, US-A-2874835, US2874835 A, US2874835A
InventorsJules Poupitch Ougljesa
Original AssigneeIllinois Tool Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container carrier and package
US 2874835 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1959 o. J. POUPITCH 2,874,835

CONTAINER CARRIER AND PACKAGE Filed Dec. 1, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Feb. 24, 1959 o. J. POUPITCH CONTAINER CARRIER AND PACKAGE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 1, 1958 v 0 INVENTOR. 2 35524 Feb. 24, 1959 o. J. POUPITCH CONTAINER CARRIER AND PACKAGE:

4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Dec. 1, 1958 Feb. 24, 1959 o, J. pouPlTl-l 2,874.835

CONTAINER CARRIER AND PACKAGE Filed Dec. 1-, 1958' 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

United States Patent 2,874,835 coNrArNER CARRIER AND PACKAGE ()ugljesa IuiesToupitch, Itasca, IlL, assignor to llllinois Tool Works, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois ..Application.l)ecember 1, 1958,Serial No;775.,3.33

17 Claims. "(CL 206- 65) This invention is concerned generally with a package or articlecarri'er, and more particularly with .a receptacle for holding and carrying'beverage containers, e. g., cans.

This application comprises a continuation-in-part of my prior applications Serial No. 642,081, filed February'25, 1957, for Can Carrier Device, now abandoned, and Serial N-o.'746.7 35, filed July 7, 1958, forfCan Carrier, now abandoned.

It is common practice to package beverages, such as Paper or pasteboard containers whichhave. been jsuffi- .ciently :strong to :be accepted commercially ..are,.undu1 y expensive, and require rather complicated packaging machinery. "Such paper containers substantially completely encase a plurality of cans, thus insulatingthe cans, and requiring that they be .removed from thepaper'contai-ner for efficient refrigeration. "Furthermore, suchpaper con- ;tainers are rather difiicult toopen.

Metallic connectors or clips havenotifound fu'll com *mercial acceptance due totheJdifiiculty of applying the clips to .the cans .in automatic machinery with sufiicient permanence. that l'the cans will not readily becomerde- 'tached'from one another.

.Prior art containers or "connectors which have 'been sufficiently strong 'to hold units of cans'firmly toge her have held such units rigidly; That is, all of the six1(or other numberlcans in "a'unit have been more or less rigidly interconnected. When a carton of such units, 8 being'a common number, is dropped,"the,tendency is for each rigid unititodirectallrof the impact simultaneously in one direction. This causes a substantial impact on the carton, tending to burst the carton. An analogy may be made to a solid ball, and amass of loosely retained shot. For equal masses,'the ball, when dropped, would create a given shock impact, while the loosely retained 'shotwould dampen the shock.

in view of the foregoing, it'is 'ajgeneralobjectof this invention to provide a 'device for holding a plurality of beverage cans together as a unit.

It'is an object of this 'inventio'nto provide such adeviee which.is,'in'itself, inexpen-siveysimple and economical toassernble withbeverageicans, without the necessity of extensive modification of existing can.handling appa- TEltllS.

'It is 'a'turther object of this inventiont-oprovidea device .for retaining a plurality of .cans together .asa .unit, whic-h device requiressbut small force ,for assembling with the cans, or for-removing the-cans therefrom-fonultimate 2,874,835 Pei-tented Feb. 24,

'use, which requires extraordinary force for accidental separation.

"-Yet another object of this invention is to provide a device for retaining a plurality of cans together as a unit with the individual cans capable of restrained movement relative to. one another.

Furthermore, it is an object of this invention toprovide a device. for holding cans together as a .unit, which device, by virtue of its own inherent characteristics aggressively grips the .cans. In paiticular, it is an object of this invention to provide a yieldable, resilient, and elastic device ofplastic material for holding a plurality of cans together as a unit.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a "sheet plastic can barrier and resulting package unit which makes a most efiicient use of the plastic material.

, Another object of the invention is to provide a plastic carrier for cans and the like, and a resulting can package or .unit wherein stressesin the plasticmaterial are sub- 'sta-ntially uniformly distributed.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a sheet plastic can carrier and resulting package or unit wherein the cans are held quiteclosely together for eflicient and facile handling thereof, and whereby the cans engage and reinforce one another'while depending from the plastic carrier.

Other and further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following descrip- "tion=when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings 1 wherein .lFig; 1 is a perspective view of a unit of six cansheld together by a device in accordance with the'principles of this invention;

. FigfiZ is an end'view of the, unitshown 'inFig. 1;

[Fig.3 *isaperspective View of the device .for'holding the cans together;

Fig. 4 is a side view of the unit of Fig. 1, certain parts being broken away;

Fig. '5 is across sectional view of theunit 'or, assembly as taken alo-ngthe line 55 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 isa view similar to Fig. 5 showing the retainer device as it is being assembled'with'the cans;

Fig. 7"is an enlarged fragmentary view in cross section illustrating the cooperation of the retainerdevicewith the cans;

Fig-8 is apeispective-viewsimilar toFig. l s'howing a modification of the invention;

Fig: 9- isan end view thereof generally similar to Fig.

" Fig; 10 is a perspective viewjof -the retainer device;

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of the handle therefor; Fig. 12 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional "view through thehandle and retainer device as taken-substantially along the line 12-'-12'in Fig. 8;

"Fig; 13 is a fragmentary view similar to a portion of "Fig.- 12 showing the manner in which the handle deforms when strain is placed thereon;

Fig. 14 is a cross sectional view taken duringjhe'assembling of the device with the cans;

Big. 15 is a' cross sectional view similar to Fig. 14 *and taken along'theline 1515-of Fig."8 following icom- 'pl'etionof the assembling operation;

Pig. leis a perspective view of a modified retainer 'deviceshowing various :steps in the process of manufacfollowing assembling of the device with a plurality of cans;

Fig. 20 is a cross sectional view through the assembled unit as taken along the line 2020 in Fig. 17;

Fig. 21 is an end view of a slightly modified device and corresponding generally to the cross section of Fig. 18;

Fig. 22 is a perspective view of a modified form of the can carrier;

Fig. 23 is a longitudinal sectional view as taken along the line 23-23 in Fig. 22;

Fig. 24 is a plan view of the carrier of Fig. 22 before assembly with the cans;

Fig. 25 is a view similar to Fig. 23, but showing the cans assembled with the carrier in a somewhat different manner;

Fig. 26 is a plan view of a further modified form of the carrier; and

Fig. 27 is a plan view of a further modified form of the carrier.

Referring now in greater particularity to Figs. 1-7, a carrier, receptacle, or retainer in accordance with the principles of this invention comprises a flat sheet of plastic material, hereinafter identified by the numeral 30. The sheet is provided with a plurality of spaced apertures 32, preferably six in number. These apertures are somewhat smaller than the diameter of a can with which the device is to be assembled, and the retainer device is made of a plastic material which is resilient, flexible, and elastic, and which will not readily tear. Polyethylene is a preferred example, but other functionally similar materials are satisfactory. The retainer 30 preferably is stamped from an elongated strip in a suitable punch press, and the scrap formed by punching the apertures 32, and by rounding off the corners as at 34, and by providing a pair of small holes 36 for accommodating a handle is readily processed for further use.

As has been noted, and as will be seen with particular reference to Fig. 6, the diameter of the apertures 32 is somewhat less than that of the cans 38 with which the retainer 30 is associated. The retainer 30 initially is fiat, and when it is pressed down over the tops of the cans 38, preferably by machinery, not shown herein, the material adjacent the apertures 32 deflects upwardly as at 40 when engaged by the can beads 42. The material 40 finally is deflected upwardly into the form of a stretched lip as may be seen in Figs. and 7. This lip has a cylindrical portion 44 in surface engagement with the surface of the can 38, andthe upper (inner) portion of the material adjacent each aperture 32 is at right angles to the plane of the sheet or retainer 30, whereby the edge 46 thereof engages beneath the right angle shoulder 48 of the bead 42'where it joins the remainder of the can 38. Thus, the deflected material 40 forms a strut beneath the can bead resisting withdrawal of the can. Furthermore, the portion 44 of the deflected lip is in tight, gripping surface engagement with the can, and this further holds the can in position. Accordingly, it is practically impossible to remove a can by pulling down on it relative to the retainer 30. However, the force necessary for assembling the retainer with the cans need not be very great.

In view of the foregoing, the cans and retainer are not easily separated by accident. However, when it is desired to remove a can from the retainer, very little force need be exerted as is set forth immediately hereinafter. It will be observed that the head 42 is rounded, and hence is capable of camming past the lip 40, if moved upwardly relative to the lip. This is particularly true in the form of head shown in the drawings, and particularly in Fig.

7 '7, wherein the outer surface 50 is of relatively small diameter at the edge adjacent the shoulder 48, and increases to a larger diameter at the outer end. Accordingly, when it is desired to remove a can, the can is simply moved upwardly relative to the retainer device 30, and the can thus moves from the device with the surface 50 of the bead 42 camming past the lip 40. It will be apparent that this requires movement the complete length of the can, and such movement is most unlikely to occur accidentally.

As will be evident with reference to Figs. 5 and 6, the adjacent portions of the edges of the apertures 32 are drawn closer to one another upon insertion of the cans, than their initial spacing. Accordingly, a substantial amount of material may be present between adjacent apertures, thereby insuring adequate strength, while allowing close spacing of the cans. As will be apparent with reference to Figs. 1, 2 and 4, a plurality of cans 38, equal in number to the plurality of apertures 32, is supported by the receptacle or retainer device 30. A handle 52 is associated with the apertures 36, and this handle conveniently is made of resilient wire bent in the form of an inverted U, and having outwardly directed ends 53 thereon. It will be apparent that the handle 52 readily is deformed slightly for slipping through the apertures 36, and this may be done substantially at the same time as the cans are assembled with the receptacle or retainer device 30, or preferably, the handles are placed in the shipping carton for insertion by the retailer or the ultimate consumer. The sheet 30 is somewhat flexible, and when the handle 52 is lifted, the sheet flexes sufiiciently for the cans to engage, and hence reinforce one another, as shown most particularly in Figs. 2 and 4.

The resulting package, identified by the numeral 54, is attractive in appearance, and is extraordinarily strong. Although the individual cans may move somewhat relative to one another, thus avoiding undue shocks on the shipping carton, it is substantially impossible for the cans to come loose from the retainer device accidentally. It has been found that when such a package or unit is dropped from carrying height or from table height, or

even from substantially greater heights, the cans will not come loose from the retainer. As will be apparent, when the cans depend from the carrier, they abut and hence reinforce one another. Since the retainer does not encase the cans, it presents no problems of insulation inhibiting cooling.

It is within the contemplation of this'invention that the deflected portion or lip adjacent each aperture in the retainer might be preformed. Such an embodiment ofv the invention is illustrated in Figs. 8-15. In these figures, corresponding parts are identified by the use of similar numerals with the addition of the suflix a. More particularly, the retainer or receptacle 30a is formed from an initially flat sheet, and has rounded corners 34a, and also has indentations or scallops 56 intermediate the adjacent apertures 32a.

With particular reference to Figs. 14 and 15, it will be seen that the lip portion 44a of the lip 49a has been preformed to a substantially frusto-conical shape. The internal diameter of the aperture 32a which is so formed or defined in each instance is substantially less than the diameter of the cans 38a, and particularly the beads 42a thereon. When the cans are inserted, the frusto-conical section is stretched and deformed to form the substantially cylindrical portion 44a, and it will be observed that this section has a greater amount or extent of surface contact with the can, than is the case with the corresponding cylindrical section 44 of the retainer or receptacle which is not preformed. It will be understood that such preforming is easily accomplished by the application of heat and pressure. The greater extent of surface engagement provides a stronger strutting action resisting withdrawal of the cans downwardly of the retainer or receptacle, and the preforming also aids in centralizing the cans relative to the apertures during mounting of the retainer or receptacle on the cans.

Two different forms of the handle are illustrated in connection with the embodiment of the retainer or receptacle shown in Figs. 8l5. As shown in Figs. l0, l4 and 15, the handle 52' comprises a wire bent into rec- '5 .--.tangular.; form shaving relatively. (lo g. horizontal reaches interconnected at corresponding ends-thy: relatively .short risers. .The risersfit relatively tightly. intofitheiindentaitions 56 atsthe oppositeqends-of the, can, anddthe lower .-reach supports the retainer along the longitudinal center line, thus stifieningand.reinforcing the-retainer, while the upper reach isgraspedby .the. hand.

.The wire.handle 52 ismadecontinuousby securing .the ends together, as by -.spot welding, .and'thethandle is readily snapped into. placeby temporarily. .deformingdhe ,retainer prior to insertion .ofzthe cans. Normallynthe handlewould betin -a lowered position with the upper reach resting on the retainer. When the. unitisatonbe carried, .the handle is raised and theglower reach abuts the underside .of the. retainer. Ill-he handle has been;

-.shown in an intermediate ,position ..to ,avoid obscuring .details that would overlie one another with. .the. handle ..either completely raised cit-lowered.

.In .the embodiment of the :inventiontshownlin. Figs. .843, the handle. 52a :takes a different .form .than that shown in. the. first embodiments of .the invention. The 'handIeSZa comprises .a:str ap of plastic material, con- -'veniently the same material as used forthezretainer 30a. The strap .is in the form .ofan inverted U,.having-,a thickened portion 58 for convenient gripping .by the hand. The ends of the strap are provided without- -wardiy and rearwardly directedflanges oll.integral with :the strap.

The apertures 36a, provided in." the retainerfifia for receipt of .the handle, comprise... slots elongated transversely of the retainer, and widened adjacenttheirtcen- .tral. portions. Thefianges 60 arefoldedin against the strap and "against .one another. for insertion .throughthe slots, eeither by.hand,..or. inzautomatic.machinerynot -shownherein. The inherent resiliency .of the plastic materialcauses the flanges; -66 ito's spring outwardly beneath the retainer-30a, as may be. seen in :Fig. -12. When .lifting rfo-rceis. a p.p1ied;to the han,dle,-.-thehandle moves rupwardly, deflecting the .fiangesfitl, as showninFig. 13,

thus wedging the retainergadjacent the slots 36a tightly I .intotheacute corners,between the flanges and the handle.

.A further embodiment of the invention isshown in Figs. l62(), with a variation'thereof.beingshown inFig. 21, in this instance, the entire retainer including .:the ,handleis extruded. More particularly, and .HSILSll'OWl'l in Fig. 11.6, anelongated-strip-62, having an upstanding ,central-web.-64 cis extruded .as a. continuous (unit. "In .suecessivestamping operations, apertures 320. are formed .in the strip .62, and an elongated aperturefifiistiormed .in the web 64. Subsequently, the extrusion, including ithe strip and the web,.is severed transversely along dividing lines as indicated at .68-to providevthe-individual retainers 300 having integral handles 52c thereon.

Conveniently,-the retainer 300 is left flat adjacent/the apertures, as in the first embodiment disclosed, although it is conternplated thatthe Flips-4hr .could he preformed. iThe cans 380 are assemblediwiththe.retainen-in the 'same :manner aspreviously disclosed to provide the complete package or unit 54c. This unit possesses certain advantages in that the integral handle need not be attached 1 'tQt-heretainer or receptacle, and in thatthe-handlecan- .not possibly come loose zfrom the retainer.

The retainer 30d shown. in Big. 21 is; produced in -the same' manner as the retain-eninFigs. 16-20, :and differs therefrornionly.in that. the web "64d iinitiallyds ,formed asa pair of angularlydiverging .strips" integral with theretainer 30d. These 'stripsare pulled :into substantially --abutting relation by .the hand of the. purchaser 'gupon. lifting the package for carrying, such relation 5 being shown. in. dashed lines in Fig. 21. ..apparent; t hat awider bearing or base-of the handle .against the fingers thus is 7 provided, particularly. as ziihe t om zi stances. .p vidingator more comfortabletcarryitlgxof hezpachag -"or:unit.- ftAStrWil'ltzltOW be appreciated,

hamlet- 836 It will be {this .invention provides. .a. retainernor:v receptacle -for. sbev- ..er'age .cans which -is 1 easily ...assembled with the .cans, .from which .itgispractically impossibleforj the cans..to ..s eparate. accidentally, and-yet it. allows ready withdrawal ;-;5 .xofltheacans when. desired. ..The packageorunitso prozducedrcan actually cbe dropped from a substantial height without causing any of the cans to become detached. The limited movementbfthe cansrelative .to one an- .other inhibits rupturing .of the.shipping .cartons when .handledroughly. .Thereceptacleor retainer 'deviceis readily assembled with :the .cans on. existing can-handling :machinery, and bothithe. cost ,of..assembling andthe cost of producing the .retainer devicev areremarkably .low.

Referring. now toI'Figs..22-24, there will be seen a .further embodiment of theinvention,.similarnumerals again being used with thesufiix d. f In.this instance, the

.can carrier. 302 .is assembled with .a plurality of cans 3% (there being six. cansin the. illustrative embodiment) to .form the package or .unit 542. .Thecarrier 3042 zagain.is generally.rectangularin outline .andhas a plurality of-canreceiving apertures SZestamped or otherwise formed therein. In the illustrative-embodiment of ,the :inventionthere are six can'receiving apertures 32c. -Theseapertures .are distinguished in that theyare non- .circular in form. .In the embodiment of Figs. 22-24 .theyzare elliptical. or. oval, but .as will be brought out connection .with. subsequent. embodiments the open- .ingscan be otherwise non-circular,. but in .all instances havinggsmoothly .arcuate edges. and devoid of sharp corners. In the present instance the major axesof the apertures:32e are oriented longitudinally of..the can car- .rierlitie, while the minoraxesthereofare ,orientedtransversely.

The. longitudinal edges of..the can .carrierare more --or less:.sinuous.in. form, :b'eing convex outwardly adja- .cent the various apertures as.-ati.7 0,. andbeingindented .or concave outwardly. .at 72..between.adjacent apertures, wherebyio maintain a more orlessuniform width of. ma- .terial between the apertures. and the outsideofjthecar- -rier; in theformof a narrow band 7.4 of material. The 1 opposite ends ofthecan carrier are also.curved in as at 76 to maintainuniformityof .the band, .andare fin- .ished straight across as at 78.

:Rectangular openingsf80 .are provided between the end pairs of apertures, and preferably have rounded ends 82 to relieve or prevent stress concentrations. .The openings 80' arerelativelylo-ng and narrow, and arelocated withth'eirmajor or'longitudinal dimensions substantially on :the center: line of the cam carrier 30eilongitudinally thereof. A larger opening 84 .is provided between the -two eenteraperturcs 18, havingrounded ends 86, and having sides 88 which are. convex toward one-another, and concave toward the adjacent apertures 32s. The apertures or openings -80 and .84 .serve to. provide .a :more .or less uniformwidth to thebands 74 .orv material encirclingthe .respectivecan receiving apertures..'32e.

.In addition to the openings or apertures heretofore .mentioned, there:is a pair of relatively smallholes 36:: respectively disposed between the central 84 andfthe -end openings 80 for receiving leg portions of. a. more or less U-shaped handle, such handle being omittedfrom vthe drawings, but preferably made'of plastic,.or;possibly wire, such-as in Fig. .1, for example.

The carrier is .forced down over the cans 38d, thus thus stretching and deforming the material adjacent .the

apertures. in order that the apertures might become circn- :larto accommodate the cans. The.materialiintermediate the apertures is deflected upwardly .-as indicated at d .in .Fig.- ?23 while the remainder -.of the adjacent. material, comprising theibands =74, isdeflected. substantially to cylindrical form wherebvthecans-are grippedfaggreszsivelyioelowcthe :beajds -44dWithzfl,i;S\1bSlflI1tl3.11Y..Sl1Ffa6 :contact.v 'Ihe-masses-cf material between the.- apertures, 75 coupled with the elliptical shape of the :apertures,

line of the carrier.

, 7 r leads to nearly uniform concentration of stress, thereby allowing lighter gauge material to be used for a given required strength than is possible with circular apertures. Furthermore, the elliptical shape of the apertures affords a narrower carrier than is possible with circular apertures. As a result, there is a savings of material up to v The carrier resists removal of the cans downwardly of the carrier, but removal can be accomplished by pulling a can outwardly away from the center line of the carrier, and simultaneously tipping it up and out. Alternatively, the can can be removed in the direction of insertion, by pushing it up through the carrier.

An alternative assembly is shown in Fig. which sometimes proves advantageous. In this instance the parts are identical with those in Figs. 22-24 (although the concept could be applied to previous examples), but the cans initially are passed nearly through the carrier so that the material adjacent the apertures is turned down rather than up. This results in a reversal of stresses from the arrangement of Figs. 22 and 23.

A modification of the invention having certain advantages is shown in Fig. 26. Similar parts are identified by the use of similar numbers with the addition of the with f, repetition of description accordingly being unnecessary. As in the previous examples of the invention, the can receiving apertures 32 are disposed symmetrically about the longitudinal center line of the carrier. The form of the apertures is somewhat different, but still approaching an ellipse as in Fig. 24, and again having the major axes parallel to the longitudinal center Specifically, the apertures 32 are fat ellipses, having one of the longer or larger radius sides at 96 of smaller radius than the opposite larger radius side. Specifically, the sides 90 are disposed toward the longitudinal center line. As a result of this configuration, the center openings are unnecessary, since the material adjacent these sides need not stretch and deform quite so much. Furthermore, the openings are thus disposed with their inner portions (the sides 90) closer to the longitudinal center line, and the cans are thus pulled in closer together. In addition, since the bulging sides need not stretch to such a great extent, it is simpler to remove the cans with an outward pulling and tipping force.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is shown in Fig. 27 which is similar to, but presents advantages over, the embodiment of Fig. 26. Again, similar parts are identified by similar numerals, this time with the suffix g. The fat ellipses forming the apertures 32g are skewed. There is still symmetry about the longitudinal center line of the carrier, and all of the major axes on either side are parallel. This form of the invention possesses the advantages of the form of Fig. 26 and additionally-presents simplified removal, since the cans are removed by tipping and pulling toward the upper adjacent corners (as positioned in Fig. 27). This pulls a can being removed away from the adjacent cans. In this form of the invention the holes 36g are enlarged sufficiently to receive a thumb and finger for carrying, a separate handle thus being unnecessary.

It will be observed that the straight line indented portions at the ends have become short arcs at 78g, due to the close approach of the apertures 32g to one another along the center line. The skewing of the ellipses also changes the longitudinal edges which are somewhat steeper at 92 adjacent the short arcs of the apertures than at 94 adjacent the long arcs.

The carrier herein disclosed is simple to associate with containers such as cans and forms a stable unit or package therewith. However the cans can be readily removed. The particularconfigurations shown lead to a substantial savings in material and a superior mounting of the cans. t

The examples as herein shown and described are to be understood to be for exemplary purposes only. Various changes in structure will no doubt occur to those skilled in the art, and are to be understood as forming a part of this invention insofar as they fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. A receptacle for retaining a plurality of containers or the like having peripheral enlargements at one end in side-by-side substantially abutting and parallel relation, comprising a substantially unsupported sheet of plastic material, said sheet of plastic material being resilient, deformable, and elastic and having a plurality of apertures therein, each of said apertures having a peripheral measurement less than the periphery of the corresponding container, the material at the edge of each aperture being circumferentially continuous and uninterrupted, the apertures in the sheet being intended for association with the containers whereby such containers can be inserted through said apertures from a given direction when the material adjacent said aperture is stretched and deformed to form circumferentially continuous lips embracing said containers beneath said peripheral enlargements and resiliently gripping said containers, and a handle associated with said sheet of plastic material for carrying said receptacle.

2. A receptacle as set forth in claim 1 wherein the sheet of plastic material is provided with a pair of spaced apart, relatively small apertures, and wherein said handle extends through said apertures and has parts underlying said sheet.

3. A receptacle as set forth in claim 2 wherein the handle comprises a strap of plastic material having projections at its ends extending laterally beneath said sheet.

4. A receptacle as set forth in claim 1 wherein the handle is integral with the sheet of plastic material.

5. A receptacle as set forth in claim 4 wherein the integral handle comprises a web extending at substantially right angles to said sheet and having aperture means therein for manual gripping.

6. A receptacle as set forth in claim 5 wherein the web comprises a pair of strips substantially joined along one edge and joined to said sheet at that edge, said strips initially diverging.

7. A beverage or the like unit comprising a plurality of containers having circular cross sections and annular enlargements at one end, and a sheet of substantially unsupported plastic material having a plurality of substantially circular apertures therein, said sheet of plastic material being resilient, deformable, and elastic, the material at the edge of each aperture being circumferentially continuous and uninterrupted, the apertures in the sheet being of smaller diameter than the containers whereby the containers, inserted through said apertures from a given direction, stretch and deform the material adjacent the apertures, the material adjacent the apertures being in the form of upwardly directed lips locking beneath said annular enlargements and resiliently gripping said containers to resist retrograde withdrawal of said containers.

8. A beverage or the like unit as set forth in claim 7 wherein each lip is in part cylindrical and is in intimate surface engagement with the corresponding container.

9. A receptacle as set forth in claim 1 wherein the apertures in the sheet of plastic material are circular.

10. A receptacle for'retaining a plurality of containers or'the like having annular enlargements at one end in 'side-by-side substantially abutting and parallel relation,

comprising a substantially unsupported sheet of plastic material, said sheet of plastic material being resilient, deformable, and elastic and having a plurality of apertures therein, each of said apertures having a peripheral measurement less than the periphery of the corre- "sponding container, the material at the 'edge of each aperture being circumferentially continuous and uninterrupted, the apertures in the sheet being intended for association with the containers whereby such containers can be inserted through said apertures from a given direction when the material adjacent said apertures is stretched and deformed to form circumferentially continuous lips embracing said containers beneath said peripheral enlargements and resiliently gripping said containers, and a handle disposed on the longitudinal center line of said sheet of plastic material and intermediate the ends thereof.

11. A receptacle as set forth in claim 10 wherein the handle comprises integral plastic means providing finger aperture means.

12. A beverage or the like unit comprising a plurality of containers having curvilinear cross sections and annular enlargements, and a sheet of substantially unsupported plastic material having a plurality of curvilinear apertures therein, said sheet of plastic material being resilient, deformable, and elastic, the material at the edge of each aperture being circumferentially continuous and uninterrupted, the peripheral measurement of each aperture being less than that of the corresponding containers whereby the containers, inserted axially through said apertures, stretch and deform the material adjacent the apertures, the material adjacent the apertures being in the form of axially directed necks engaging said containers below said enlargements and resiliently gripping said containers to resist withdrawal thereof, said containers depending from said sheet of plastic material in side by side abutting relation whereby to reinforce one another upon carrying of said unit.

13. A beverage or the like unit as set forth in claim 12 wherein the apertures are each defined by four arcs, two of relatively greater radius and two of relatively lesser radius.

14. A unit as set forth in claim 13 wherein one of the greater radius arcs is of larger radius than the other greater radius are.

15. A unit as set forth in claim 13 wherein the apertures are substantially elliptical.

l6. A receptacle as set forth in claim 10 wherein the apertures are substantially in the form of ellipses.

17. A receptacle as set forth in claim 16 wherein one of the longer sides of each elliptical aperture bulges outwardly, being of shorter radius than the opposite longer side.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2989177 *Jan 16, 1959Jun 20, 1961Illinois Tool WorksContainer carrier and package
US2994426 *Jan 22, 1959Aug 1, 1961Illinois Tool WorksCarrier and carrier package
US2997169 *Feb 6, 1958Aug 22, 1961Illinois Tool WorksContainer-carrier device
US3014122 *May 11, 1959Dec 19, 1961John HornackPhotographic equipment
US3032943 *Aug 12, 1960May 8, 1962Reimers James LAssembly machine
US3038600 *Dec 30, 1958Jun 12, 1962Powell Truman WCarton for receiving and carrying beverage cans and the like
US3038602 *Dec 10, 1959Jun 12, 1962Illinois Tool WorksContainer carrier
US3039881 *Sep 9, 1959Jun 19, 1962Joseph ShapiroIce cream cone package
US3044230 *Jan 16, 1959Jul 17, 1962Illinois Tool WorksContainer carrier and package
US3046711 *Dec 8, 1960Jul 31, 1962Grace W R & CoMultiple can carrier and sanitary seal
US3084792 *Sep 23, 1960Apr 9, 1963Illinois Tool WorksContainer carrier
US3086651 *Apr 6, 1961Apr 23, 1963Illinois Tool WorksContainer-carrier device
US3097740 *Oct 21, 1960Jul 16, 1963Illinois Tool WorksContainer carrier pack and method of making same
US3118645 *Nov 24, 1961Jan 21, 1964Gen Water Conditioning IncSupport means for spray type containers
US3134485 *Jan 16, 1961May 26, 1964Arthur B WillisMultiple packaging apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/150, 53/48.4, 294/87.2, 220/23.4, 206/164
International ClassificationB65D71/50
Cooperative ClassificationB65D71/50, B65D71/504
European ClassificationB65D71/50D, B65D71/50