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Publication numberUS2875949 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1959
Filing dateNov 7, 1957
Priority dateNov 7, 1957
Publication numberUS 2875949 A, US 2875949A, US-A-2875949, US2875949 A, US2875949A
InventorsTarsoly Balazs
Original AssigneeTarsoly Balazs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Material separator and energy apparatus
US 2875949 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1959 B. TARSOLY MATERIAL SEPARATOR AND ENERGY APPARATUS -3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fil'ed Nov. 7, 195'7A A Rw. m a oOA TS P N ER T Sms WA T a ww I T. A mw. S 4 wvlf Z A m A l f. un A B A w Y ,B

March 3, 1959 B. TARsoLY MATERIALl SEPARATOR AND ENERGY APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet `2 Filed Nov.- '7, 1957 IN VEN TOR. BALAZS TARSOLY ATTOEVEY B. TARSOLY March 3, 1959 MATERIAL sEPARAToR AND ENERGY APPARATUS Filed Nov. 7, 1957 5 Sheets-S1166*l f5 INVENTOR.

BAL/'A25 v"rARsoLY United States Patent 2,875,949 i MATERIAL SEPARATOR AND ENERGY APPARATUS Balzs Tarsoly, North Pelham, N. Y.

Application November 7, 1957, Serial No. 694,990 6 Claims. (Cl. 23327) This invention relates to the art of centrifugal separators for materials of different densities.

The invention is directed at providing a device adapted to separate gases, liquids, or finely divided solids. The device is adapted to separate mixtures of steam vapor and water, oils containing constituents of different densities or viscosities, dusts or powders of-diierent sizes entrained in streams of air or liquid, etc.

A principal object of the invention is to provide a separator in which a vortex of great rotational velocity is obtained without use of baffles and impellers.

A further object is to provide a separator which has a dynamically balanced rotatable vortex chamber to increase the centrifugal forces upon the constituents to be separated.

A further object is to provide a separator including a turbine stator supporting a uid driven rotor, with a vortex chamber for separating material contained in the rotor.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

AIn the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of anassembly of apparatus embodying the invention. v e n Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the apparatus of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is an elevational view partly in longitudinal section of a rotor employed in the separator.

Fig.V 4 isla perspective view of the rotor.

, Figs. .5 and 6 are top and perspective views respectively of inlet means for vfeeding material to be separated to the separator. l

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the stator of the separator with a portion broken away to show internal parts for supplying driving fluid to the rotor.'y l p Fig. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken on lines 848 of 1:"ig.7.l Y Y Figs. 9 and l0 aretop andV perspective views respectively of outlet means for the separated material from the separator. ,l e

Fig, 11 is a sectional view of the rotor on an enlarged scale with paths of motion of the divided materialindicated by dotted lines.

,Fig. l2 is a plan view of a helically grooved ring employed in the rotor.

In Figs. 1 and 2, there is shown compressor 21 provided with an air inlet 22. The compressor serves to compress the air and deliver it at high pressure to the fluid divider shell 24. Valve 25 controls the air iiow from the compressor via pipe 27. A gauge 28 indicates the pressure in the tank of the compressor. The compressor is driven by a motor 30 which is energized via wires 32 controlled by switch 31. The divider shell '24 i's connected via'pipesA-33 and 34 to two further divider shells 35, 36 provided with pressure gauges 39 and 40.

Y 2,875,949 Patented Mar. 3, 1959 Valves 41 and 42 control the flow of compressed air through pipes 33 and 34. Branch pipes 45 and 46 are connected from divider shell 36 to stator ring 48 of the separator. Branch pipes 50 and 51 are connected from divider shell 35 to another stator ring 49 of the separator. Stands '52 and 53 support the pipes between the divider shells 36, 36 and the stator rings.

T-he stator ringsv are mounted in retainers 55. The rings rest on a base plate 56. A rotor 60v is freely rotatable within the stator rings. The rotor has inlet tubes orv pipes 61, 61a at opposite ends for receiving the material to be separated in a chamber within the rotor. Inlet pipes 61 and 61a terminate in shells 64 and 65. These shells have apertures 67a in their inwardly facing sides 66 in which sides are mounted bearing rings 67. The ends `of the inlet pipes are journaled to rotate in .thesebearings Inlet feeder pipes 68 and l69 communicate through chambers in the shells 64, 65 with the open ends of pipes 61 and 61a. These pipes are branches of the common feeder pipep70` which is supplied with the material to be separated froma hopper 71. .A 'valve 72 in pipe 70 controls the ow of the material through pipe 70.

Two pairs of pans 74, 76 and 74a, 76a are provided on each side of the stator rings. These pans are .arranged to receive the separated material discharged from the rotor. Outlet pipes 80, 80'a are connected to pans 74, 74a and outlet pipes 81, 81a are connected to pans 7,4 and 76a. Pipes 80, 80a j-oin at the common outlet pipe 84. Pipes 81, 81a join at the common outlet pipe 85.

vThe structure of the rotor 60 is best shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 1l. The rotor includes an outer ringl 87 formed with a succession' of vanes 88 arranged as a chain of Vs with central connecting walls 89. A vgenerally'cylindrical shell is formed by a pair of cylindrical shell members 78,` 78' having flanges 90 on the inner ends thereof. Bolts 91 secure the ilanges of the two shell members together with the ring 87 disposed therebetween. yThe shell members 78, 78a have inwardly tapered ends 781.v

Tubes or pipes 92.and 92.a are concentrically disposed around pipes 61 and 61a. Radially disposed ribs 93 secure the tubes 92, 92a within the'shell members. One end of each tube 92, 92a extends out of the respective shell member and has a ange 94 disposed thereon. These .flanges are slightly spaced from' the open len ds of lthe Vtapered portions 78h ofthe shell members.A Spaced from flanges 94 are other flanges 95. These anges have smallerV diameters than flanges' 94. Flanges 95 are spaced from the =ope`n ends of tubes 92 andp92a. `Rings 96 and 96a having helical grooves V97 therein' are mounted on ber 98 is thus formed within the rotor. `This chamber communicates via the helical passages with. the annular openings between tubes 92, 92?L and shell members 78, 78a. The Vchamber 98 also communicates with'the'an nular openings between tubes 61', 61a and tubes 92, 92a. In Fig. l1 the showing of rings 96 and 96EL is lomitted in order'to show the helical paths P of material flowing from chamber 98 to the two outlets -at each end of the rotor. The path of flow of material intothe rotor is shown by dotted lines A and the paths of .the separated material is shown by dotted lines B and C respectively.v Chamber 98 serves as a mixing 'and comminuting chamberfor the material entering via pipes 61 and 61a;

In Figs. l, 2, 5 and 6 are shown the arrangement of the 'inlet pipes 68 and 69 which are connected between feederi pipe 70 and the shells 64 and6,5.l -vThe endsof pipes 61, 61 t into apertures 67a and are rotatable therein on bearings 67 shown in Fig. 2. A pressure gauge 73 may be provided in pipe 70 for indicating the pressure of materialiowing therethrough into-pipes 68, 69.

In Figs. 7 and 8n are shown the details of the stator rings 48 and 49. These rings are endless tubes. Pipes 45 and are 4conencted at diametrically opposed points to ring 48`and pipes 50, 51 are connected similarly to 'ring 49. The rings have each a plurality of nipples 47 opening in their lower sides. The rings are secured to an outer band 54 which has a plurality of spaced passages 57 communicating with nipples 47 in the rings 48, 49. Another band 58 provided with pairs of diagonally extending passages 59, l59a4 is disposed inside band 54. Band 58 is prevented from moving with respect to band 54 by loosely vcontacting serrated plates Y62 and 62a respectively mounted on the sidesA of band S and rings 4.8, 49. A handle 63 has laterally disposed bars 632.t connected to both plates 62 on band 58. The teeth yof plates 62, '62"L are rather loosely engaged so that the inner band 58 can be moved slightly circumferentially with respect to band 54.V At one 'end of the movement of band 58 passages 57 communicate with passages 59 and at 'the other end of movement of the inner band passages 57. communicate with passages 59a. Rings 48 and 49 are prevented from rotating by their mounting in retainers 55.

Rotor 60 is rotatably mounted in the band 58. When the handle bars 63a are vertical, passages 57 and 59 are in communication, so that streams of air at high pressure emitted from passages 59 impinge on vanes 88 and cause the vrotor to rotate at high speed. When it is desired to the rotor, the handle 63 is moved to cause passages 5 7 to communicate with the passages 59H. The air streams will now be directed oblqnely at the vanes 88 in directions which will oppose lthe rotation of the rotor so that thel rotor is gradually brought to a stop. The device is thus provided with an air braking means. The device uses compressed air to rotate the rotor and to brake the rotor.

lIn Figs. 1, 2, 9 and 10 are shown the pans 74, 74a which receive the separated material from rotor openings adjacent anges 94 of the rotor. These pans have cavities which communicate -with outlet 84 via pipes 80, 80, Qn its inner side 74 each of these pans has an opening 82 which is large enough to pass the flanges 94 and 95 of the rotor. The outer side 83 of each of pans 74, and 74. has an opening 86`best shown in Fig. 2, which opening is just large enoughV to pass the flange 95 at each end of the rotor. Flanges 94 are rotatably disposed in the pans 74, 74' and close the openings 86; The outer ends of tubes 92 and .92a extend through openings 86 and terminate in pans 76 and 764. These pans are connected via pipes 81, 8,1 to outlet pipe 85. The outer sides 76' ofpans 76, 76e have openings 79 through which pass the ends of pipes 61 and 61a' respectively. Flanges 95 are disposed in pans 76, 76%l and are located adjacent sides 76. @penings 77 in the inner sides of pans 76, 76ab are just large enough to pass the flanges 95 of the rotor.

By the arrangement of the pans and their associated outlet pipes, all materials separated in the rotor pass in parallel streams to pipes 80, 80 and 81, 81e.

In`operation of the apparatus, the rotor will be driven by compresed air provided by compressor 21 and fed via the stator rings. Material to be separated such as finely divided solids in a liquid carrier will pass from container 'Iliinto the chamber 98 in the rotor. The material passes i'ntwo opposed streams into the chamber where a turbulent condition is established. The rapid rotation of the rotor imparts a rotating vswirling motion `to the mixing s'tr'amswliich divideintoequal parts passing through the two'lrelical passages 97 lin tl1`e`tw`o rings 96 vand V969'l best shown Vin Figs. 3 and 12. Due to the different densities and of the substances in l'the rotating streams, particles "of greater densityv pass out of the radially outerf'spaees between the sh'ell members 78, 78land-tubes 92, 925 into pans 74, 74a. Particles of lesser density will pass out of the radially inner spaces between tubes 61, 61Bl and tubes 92, 92a into pans 76, 76a.

Instead of a hopper 71, there may be provided a closed container supplying a mixture of gases, or liquids under pressure to the rotor for separation thereby.

The separated materials passing through outlet pipes 84 and 85 may be collected in suitable containers. If desired, the rather high kinetic energy imparted to the streams of materials in the several outlet pipes may be fed to suitable turbines or other engines to perform useful work.

It will be -noted that the entire assembly of the rotor 60 has a balanced symmetrical structure. This permits the separator to operate at high speeds of the order of 10,000 or more R. P. M. The high speed of rotation of the mixture of oppositely directed streams in chamber 58 causes a very tine comminution of the streams to take place so that the streams passing through rings 96, 96 are really tine sprays of minute droplets rather than heavy streams of solidly ilowing material.

If the apparatus be used primarily for performance of useful work bythe several high pressure streams issuing Afrom outlets 84 and 85, the apparatus may be regarded as an energy converter, in which the latent energy in the compressed air which drives the rotor is converted to kinetic energy in the streams of lluid in the several outlets.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what l claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent 1. A material separation apparatus, comprising a stator, means for supplying compressed gas to the stator, a rotor having a plurality of vanes rotatably mounted in the stator and positioned to receive said compressed gas from the stator, said rotor having a generally cylindrically walled chamber, mechanical means mounted on the stator and arranged to direct said gas in one direction on the vanes to rotate the rotor and to direct said gas in another direction on the rotating rotor to stop rotation thereof, tubular inlets supplying material to be separated into streams of two diierent densities connected to opposite ends of the rotor and opening into said chamber, said rotor having two outlets at each end, and a pair of spaced axially aligned rings respectively mounted between an inner end of each tubular inlet and the wall of said chamber, each ring having a helical groove therein to provide a helical passage between an inlet and an outlet of the rotor, one outlet ateach end of the rotor beingadapted to emit streams of material having one density and the other outlet at each end of the rotor being adapted to emit streams of material having a different density.

2. `A material separation apparatus, comprising a stator including a pair of endless hollow rings, a rst cylindrical band supporting said rings, retainer means maintaining the rings in vertical stationary positions side by side on s aid band; another band movably disposed within the first band, manually operable means operatively connecting said inner band to said rings for controlling movement of the inner band, said ringsY having spaced openings communicating with radial passages inthe rst band, said inner band having obliquely disposed pairs of passages, the passages in eachof said pairs alternatively communicating with the radial passages at opposite exf tremesof movement of said inner band, a rotor rotatably mounted in said inner band, said rotor including an outer ring Vformed with a chain of V-shaped vanes, a chamber formed in said outer ring, a pair of cylindrical shell members secured in axial alignment to said outer ring, `a lirst pair of tubesextendinginto said shell members from `opposite ends thereof, a second pair of tubes respectively concentrically surrounding the first-tubes and disposed between the rst tubes and the shell members, a second pair of rings each having a helical groove therein respectively mounted between the inner end of each of the iirst tubes and one of the shell members, each of the first and second tubes having a radially extending'flange nearV the outer end thereof and disposed outside the shell members, a container for material to be` separated into constituents of greater and lesser density connected to the outer ends of the irst tubes, a first pair of pans, said first tubes extending axially through said pans with the second tubes terminating in the pans, and a second pair of pans, said second tubes extending axially through the second pair of pans with the shell'members terminating in the second pans. s.

y 3. A material. separation apparatus, comprising a stator including apair of endless hollow rings, a first cylindrical band supporting said'ringrs, retainer means maintaining the rings in vertical stationary positions side by side `on said band, another band movably disposed within the Vfirst band, manually `operable means operativelyconnecting said inner band to said ringsfor controlling movement of the inner band, said rings having spaced openings communicating with radial passages in the first band, said inner band having obliquely disposed pairs of passages, the passages in eachV of said pairs alternatively communicating with the radial passages at Vopposite extremes of movement of said inner band, a rotor rotatably mounted in said inner band, said rotor including an outer ring formed with a chain of V-shaped vanes, a chamber formed in said outer ring, a pair, of cylindrical shell members secured in axial alignmentto said outer ring, Va irst pair of tubes extending into said shell members from opposite ends thereof', a second pair of tubes respectively concentrically surrounding the first tubes and disposed between the iirst tubes and the shell members, a second pair of rings each having a helical groove therein respectively mounted between the inner end of each ofthe first tubes and one of the shell members, ea ch of theiirst'and `second tubes having a radially extending flange near the outer end thereof and disposed outside the shell members, a container for Y material to be separated into constituents of greater and lesser density, 'a first pair Vof branch pipes extending from thecontainer to a pair of shell bearing members, the outer ends of the rst tubes being rotatably disposed in the shell bearing -members and communicating with said branch pipes, a first pair of pans, said tirst tubes extending axially through said pans with the anges thereon nestled in the pans, a second pair of branch pipes connected to the pans and communicating with said chamber via annular spaces between the rst and second tubes, said second pair of branch pipes terminating in a tirst common outlet pipe, a third pair of branch pipes, a second pair of pans, said second tubes extending axially through the second pair of pans with the flanges on the second tubes nestled in the second branch pipes connected between another outlet pipe and the second pans and communicating with said chamber via annular spaces between the second tubes and the shell members, and means to deliver gas under pressure to the rotor for driving the rotor and causing said material to be separated. Y

4. A material separation apparatus, comprising a stator including a pair of endless hollow rings, a first cylindrical band supporting said rings, retainer means maintaining the rings in vertical stationary positions side by side on said band, another band movably disposed within the first band, manually operable means operatively connecting said inner band to said rings for controlling movement of the inner band, said rlngs having spaced openings communicating with radial passages in the first band, said inner band having obliquely disposed pairs of passages, the passages in each of said pairs ioy pans, a third pair of lof shell bearing members,

6 alternatively communicating with'V the-radial passages at opposite extremes of movement of said inner band, a rotor rotatably mounted in saidr inner band, said rotor including an outer ring formed with a chain of V-shaped vanes, a chamber formed in saidv outer ring, a pair of cylindrical shell members secured in axial alignment to said outer ring, a iirst pair of tubes extending into said shell members from oppositev ends thereof, a second pair of tubes respectively concentrically surrounding the rst tubes and disposed between the rst tubes and the shell members, a second pair of rings each having va helical groove therein respectively mounted between the inner end of each of the first tubes and yone of the shell members, a container for material to be separated into constituents of greater and lesser density, a iirst pair of branch pipes extending from the container to a pair the outer ends of the iirst tubes being rotatably disposed in the shell bearing members and communicatingV with said` branch pipes, a first pair of pans, said first tubes extending axially through said pans, a second pair of branch pipes connected to the pans and communicating with said chamber via annular spaces between the first ands'econd tubes, said second pair of branch pipes terminating in a first common outlet pipe, a Asecond pair of pans, said second tubes extending axially through the second'pair of pans, a third pair of branch pipes connected between another outlet pipe and the second pans and communicating with said chamber via annular spaces between the second tubes and the shell members, a fourth pair of branch pipes connected to one of the hollow rings, a lifth pair of branch pipes connected to the other hollow ring, and means to supply compressed gas to the fifth and sixth pairs of branch pipes to drive the rotor, whereby rotation of the rotor causes material delivered to the rotor from the container to be separated into four. finelyl comminuted streams of material of two different densities, each two streams having the same density being delivered to the same outlet pipe.

5. A Imaterial separation apparatus, comprising a stator including a pair of lendless hollow rings, a irst cylindrical band supportingsaid rings, retainer means maintaining the rings in vertical stationary positions side by side on said band, another band movably disposed within the rstband, manually operable-means operatively connecting said inner band to said rings for controlling movement of the inner band, said rings having spaced openings communicating with radial passages in the rst band, said inner band having obliquely disposed pairs of passages, the passages in each of said pairs alternatively communicating with the radial passages at opposite extremes of movement of said inner band, a rotor rotatably mounted in said inner band, said rotor including an outer ring fonmed withV a chain of V-shaped vanes, a chamber formed in said outer ring, a pair of cylindrical shell members secured in axial alignment to said outer ring, a first pair of tubes extending into said shell members from opposite ends thereof, a second pair of tubes respectively concentrically surrounding the iirst tubes and disposed between the first tubes and the shell members, a second pair of rings each having a helical groove therein respectively mounted between the inner end of each of the first tubes and one of the shell members, each of the first and second tubes having a radially extending ange near the outer end thereof and disposed outside the shell members, a container for material to be separated into constituents of greater and lesser density, a first pair of branch pipes extending from the container to a pair of shell bearing members, the outer ends of the rst tubes being rotatably disposed in the shell bearing members and communicating with said branch pipes, a first pair of pans, said irst tubes extending axially Y through said pans with the anges thereon nestled in the 7 ond rings and annular spaces between the trst and second tubes, said secondnpar of branch pipes terminating in a .first 69mm@ Outlet pipe, a Seegnd pair 0f parte, said second tubes extending axially through the second pair of pans with the anges on the second tubes nestled in the second pans, a third pair of branch pipes connected between another common outlet pipe and the second pans and communicating with said chamber via said second rings and annular spaces between the second tubes and the shell members, a fourth pair of branch pipes connected to one of the hollow rings, a fth pair of branch pipes connected to the other hollow ring, and means to supply compressed gas lto the fifth andsixth 'pairs of branch pipes respectively, wherebyv air under pressure is delivered to the stator and caused to impinge upon the vanes of the rotor to rotate the rotor at high speed, and whereby rotation of the rotor causes material delivered from said container to said chamber via said first and second pair of branch pipes to be separated into 4a pair ofkinely comminuted streams of material f separately emitted from each'e'nd of the rotor into lthe irst and second pans respectively, so .that the separate streams are delivered to the respective outlet pipes in two merged streams of different density material.

6. A material separation apparatus, vcomprising a stator including a pair of endless hollow rings, a rst cylindrical band supporting said rings, retainer means maintaining the rings in vertical stationary positions side by side on said band, another band movably disposed within the first band, manually operable means operatively conv necting said inner band to said rings for controlling movement of the inner band, said rings having spaced openings communicatingwith radial passages in therst band, said inner band havingu obliquely'disposed vpairs Vof passages, the passages Vin each of saidl pairs alternatively communicating with the radial passages at opposite extremes of movement of said inner band, a rotor rotatably mounted in said inner band, said rotor including an outer ring fonmed With a Vchain of V-shaped vanes, a chamber formed in said outer ring, a pair of cylindrical shell members secured in axial alignment to said outer ring, a first pair of tubes extending into said shell members from opposite ends thereof, a secondfpar of tubes respectively concentrically surrounding the irst tubes and disposed between the vfirst tubes and the shell members, a second pair of rings each .having a helical groove therein respectively mounted between the inner end of each of the rst tubes and one of the shellmembers, each of the rstand second tubes having a radially extending flange near the outer end thereof and disposed outside the Yshell members, a container for material to be separated into constituents of greater and lesser density, a first pair off branch pipes extending from the container to a pair of shell'bearing members, the outer ends of the tirst tubesibeing rotatably disposed in the shell bearing members and communicating with said lirst branch pipes, a first pair of pans, said first tubes extending axially through said pans with the flanges thereon nestled in the pans, a second pair of branch pipes connected to the pans and communicating with said chamber via said second rings and annular spaces between the rst and second tubes,'saidi second pair of branch pipes terminating in a irst common outlet pipe, a second pair of pans, lsaid second'tubes extending axially through the second pair of vpans with the flanges on the second tubes nestled in the second pans, a third pair of branch pipes connected between another common outlet pipe and the second pans and communicating with said chamber via-,said second rings and annular spaces between the second tubes andthe shell members', a fourth pair of branch pipes connected to one of the hollow rings, a fth pair of branch pipes connected to the other hollow ring, an air compressor, a gas divider shell, a pipe connected between the compressor and divider shell, a sixth pair of branch pipes connected vbetween the divider shell and the fth and sixth pairs of branch pipes respectively, whereby air under'pressure is delivered toV the stator and caused to impinge upon the vanes of the rotor to rotate the rotor at high speed, and whereby rotation of the rotor causes materialM delivered from said container to said chamber via said r'st'and second pair of branch pipes to be separated into a pair nof Vfinely comminuted streams of material separately emitted from each end of the rotor into thetirst and second p ans respectively, so that the separate streams are delivered to the respective outlet pipes in two merged streams of diterent density material.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US500787 *May 12, 1892Jul 4, 1893 Centrifugal creamer
US2688437 *Nov 30, 1948Sep 7, 1954Saint GobainCentrifugal separator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4594149 *May 21, 1982Jun 10, 1986Mag-Sep Corp.Apparatus and method employing magnetic fluids for separating particles
US4819808 *Jun 2, 1986Apr 11, 1989Mag-Sep Corp.Apparatus and method employing magnetic fluids for separating particles
US6238330Jul 21, 2000May 29, 2001The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMicrocentrifuge
US6241650 *Feb 16, 2000Jun 5, 2001JouanCentifuge with pneumatic drive and filtration of the atmosphere of its chamber
US6273848Oct 21, 1998Aug 14, 2001The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMethod for simultaneous centrifugation of samples
US6334841 *Feb 29, 2000Jan 1, 2002JouanCentrifuge with Ranque vortex tube cooling
US6387031Jan 28, 2000May 14, 2002Genomic Instrumentation Services, Inc.Array centrifuge
US6652136Mar 26, 2001Nov 25, 2003The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMethod of simultaneous mixing of samples
US6929596 *Feb 7, 2003Aug 16, 2005Fleetguard, Inc.Centrifuge with separate hero turbine
US20040157719 *Feb 7, 2003Aug 12, 2004Amirkhanian Hendrik N.Centrifuge with separate hero turbine
WO1999012651A1 *Sep 11, 1998Mar 18, 1999The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityFlow-through microcentrifuge
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/24, 494/43, 494/10
International ClassificationB07B7/08, B04B1/02, B01D45/12, B01D53/24
Cooperative ClassificationB07B7/08, B01D45/12, B01D53/24, B04B2005/0457, B04B1/02
European ClassificationB07B7/08, B01D45/12, B01D53/24, B04B1/02