Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2878592 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1959
Filing dateFeb 21, 1958
Priority dateFeb 21, 1958
Publication numberUS 2878592 A, US 2878592A, US-A-2878592, US2878592 A, US2878592A
InventorsCisko Jr Frederick S
Original AssigneeCisko Jr Frederick S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baseball shoes having base-running spikes
US 2878592 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 24, 1959 F. s. CISKO, JR 2,878,592

BASEBALL SHOES HAVING BASE-RUNNING SPIKES Filed Feb. 21, 1958 I INVENTOR. Freda/"wk .51 (215/60, J/

M KILL-AL flTTORNEX- United BASEBALL SHOES HAVING BASE-RUNNING SPIKES This invention relates to baseball shoes and more particularly to the provision of base-running spikes in predetermined relation on the right and left shoe of a pair of baseball shoes.

Heretofore, it has been the practice to have baseball shoes provided with a plurality of ground-engaging spikes secured to the soles of the shoes to project downwardly. However, it has been found that in running the bases, particularly in turning at the bases, there is a tendency for the foot to slip due to the fact that the weight is shifted from the spikes on the bottom of the shoe to the outer side of the left shoe and inner side of the right shoe so that the bottom spikes do not efiectively control the traction.

The present invention overcomes this difliculty by providing a base-running spike means disposed on the outer side of the left shoe and the inner side of the right shoe which is adapted to be normally in an inoperative position and which becomes operative during the turning of a base to grip the ground and prevent slippage.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the specification and claims when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 shows a bottom view of the left shoe.

Fig. 2 is a bottom view of the right shoe.

Fig. 3 is a side view of the shoe showing the spike in position.

Fig. 4 is av sectional view taken along lines 4-4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a back view of the right shoe.

Figs. 1 and 2 show a pair of right and left baseball shoes. It will be noted that each shoe S is provided with a sole and a heel portion 11 on each of which is mounted a sole spike plate 12 having the usual three spikes 13 set in triangular relationship and a heel spike plate 14 having the usual three spikes 15.

In accordance with the present invention the sole of the left shoe is provided with a lateral extension 16 adjacent the outer side of the sole and the heel is provided with a similar lateral extension 17. Similarly, as shown in Fig. 2, the sole on the inner side of the right shoe is provided with a lateral extension 13 and the heel is provided with a lateral extension 19. Each of these extensions is provided with a base-running spike 24 As shown in Figs. 3-5, the extensions of the sole are upwardly inclined so that the base-running spike carried thereby is normally located above the bottom of the sole so that it does not interfere with the operation of the bottom spikes 13, during the normal movement of the player in fielding the ball or otherwise moving.

Patet O M 2,878,592 iatented Mar. 24, 1959 While the sole may be held in inclined position in many ways, in the herein illustrated form of the invention it is held in this position by having the plate 21 carrying the base-running spike secured to the sole or heel and being bent to an upwardly inclined position. The plate 21 with the spike can be formed as a separate unit or, as in the illustrated form of the invention, the plate 21 comprises a lateral extension or projection formed on the spike plates 12, 14 secured to the bottom of the shoe. As shown in the drawings, the lateral extension or projection 21 is bent upwardly adjacent the edge of the shoe and properly positions the base-running spike.

While the base-running spike 20 may take many forms, it is herein illustrated as a spade-like, flat, elongate spike member which is positioned substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the shoe so that it becomes effective to prevent lateral slipping of the foot as the base runner turns the base.

Variations and modifications may be made within the scope of the claims and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

I claim:

1. A baseball shoe having a sole and heel, each provided with a lateral, upwardly inclined extension at one side, and a spike secured to each of said extensions to project downwardly therefrom, said spikes being located above the plane of the bottom of the shoe and becoming operative to grip the ground as the wearer rounds a base to prevent slipping thereat.

2. A baseball shoe having a sole and heel, each provided with a lateral extension at one side, a spike secured to each of said extensions to project downwardly, and means engaging the undersurface of said sole and extension and bending said lateral extensions upwardly whereby said spikes are located above the plane of the bottom of the shoe and become operative to grip the ground as the shoe is tilted in the direction of said spike.

3. A baseball shoe having a sole and heel, each provided with a lateral extension at one side, spike plates secured to the bottom of the sole and heel, said plates having a lateral and upwardly inclined projection overlying and bending said lateral extensions upwardly, a depending base-running spike carried by the projections and located above the bottom of the shoe to become operative to grip the ground as the wearer rounds a base to prevent slipping thereat.

4. A baseball shoe cleat consisting of a plate adapted to be secured to the shoe and having spikes projecting downwardly therefrom, said plate having a lateral extension projecting therefrom and inclined upwardly from the plane of the plate and provided with a base-running spike disposed above the plane of the plate and adapted to become operative to grip the ground as the wearer rounds a base to prevent slipping thereat.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,034,476 McCarthy Aug. 6, 1912 1,041,667 Pierce Oct. 15, 1912 1,743,235 Richardson Jan. 14, 1930 1,827,515 Goldenberg Oct. 13, 1931 2,002,864 Nichols May 28, 1935 2,095,095 Howard Oct. 5, 1937 2,179,942 Lyne Nov. 14, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1034476 *Apr 6, 1912Aug 6, 1912Thomas F MccarthyCleat for base-ball shoes.
US1041667 *Aug 3, 1911Oct 15, 1912George L PierceCleat for athletic shoes.
US1743285 *Aug 3, 1929Jan 14, 1930Richardson Edward ACleat
US1827515 *Aug 16, 1929Oct 13, 1931Michael GoldenbergAntislip shoe
US2002864 *Jul 31, 1933May 28, 1935Ralph NicholsTraction device for athletic shoes or the like
US2095095 *Sep 26, 1936Oct 5, 1937Spalding & Bros AgSpike for golf shoes
US2179942 *Jul 11, 1938Nov 14, 1939Lyne Robert AGolf shoe attachment
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4194310 *Oct 30, 1978Mar 25, 1980Brs, Inc.Athletic shoe for artificial turf with molded cleats on the sides thereof
US4642917 *Feb 5, 1985Feb 17, 1987Hyde Athletic Industries, Inc.Athletic shoe having improved sole construction
US6178667Apr 22, 1999Jan 30, 2001Mizuno CorporationSole of baseball spiked shoe and method of measuring shearing stress distribution of baseball spiked shoe
US6182381 *Nov 4, 1996Feb 6, 2001Mizuno CorporationSole of baseball spiked shoe and method of measuring shearing stress distribution of baseball spiked shoe
US6186000Apr 22, 1999Feb 13, 2001Mizuno CorporationApparatus and method for measuring shearing stress distribution on the sole of a spiked shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/126, 36/134, 36/59.00R
International ClassificationA43C13/04, A43C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C13/04
European ClassificationA43C13/04