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Publication numberUS2879003 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1959
Filing dateSep 24, 1956
Priority dateSep 24, 1956
Publication numberUS 2879003 A, US 2879003A, US-A-2879003, US2879003 A, US2879003A
InventorsFinn Charles O
Original AssigneeFinn Equipment Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nozzles for spraying aqueous solutions containing a high percentage of solids
US 2879003 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 24, 1959 Filed Sept. 24, 1956 C. O. FINN NOZZLES FOR SPRAYING AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS CONTAINING A HIGH PERCENTAGE OF SOLIDS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INV TOR.

March 24, 1959 c. o. FINN 2, ,00

NOZZLEZS FOR SPRAYING AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS CONTAINING A HIGH PERCENTAGE OF souos Filed Sept. 24, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l4 7 27fl 28' i2 ma; 49

F Ill United States Patent NOZZLES FOR SPRAYING AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS CONTAINING A HIGH PERCENTAGE OF SOLIDS Charles 0. Finn, Cincinnati, Ohio, assigner to The Finn Efqiglpiment Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation 0 Application September 24, 1956, Serial No. 611,665

4Claims. (Cl. 239-398) This invention relates to nozzles and more particularly to nozzles for spraying aqueous dispersions containing a high percentage of solids, such as fertilizer, lime, seed and other solids like peat moss for example.

An object of this invention is to provide a relatively simple, inexpensive but effective nozzle for spraying-high solids containing dispersions such as aqueous dispersions of water, seed, fertilizer, lime and other solids such as peat moss for example. a

A further object is to provide a nozzle that will give a wide ribbon-like pattern to the dispersion issuing therefrom.

A still further object is to provide, a nozzle comprising essentially an inner nozzle similar to the standard firehose type and an outer telescoping barrel having at the forward end a nozzle chamber into which the inner nozzle discharges, the chamber terminating in a relatively wide substantially rectangular orifice which forms the pattern of the spray issuing therefrom.

A still furtherobject is to provide a nozzle as in the next preceding object in which the roof of the chamber of the outer barrel is arched upwardly whereby the distance or carry of the. spray issuing therefrom may be predetermined to suit requirements.

And a still further object is to provide a nozzle as set forth above in which the carry and the width of the spray may be controlled by the shape of the nozzle chamber of the outer barrel.

The above and other objects of the invention will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art to which the invention pertains from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary'view in side elevation of a spray nozzle stand showing the' inner member of the spray nozzle embodying a form of the invention;

Fig; .2 is a view in section of the inner member of the nozzle; I

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the spray nozzle;

Fig. 4 is a view in section taken on line 4 4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a view in section taken'on line 5-,-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a view in elevation of the orifice end of the nozzle shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5;

Fig. 7 is a plan view of a spray nozzleembodying a modified form of the invention;

' Fig. 8 isa' view in section taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 9 is "aview in elevation of the orifice end of the nozzle of Figs; 7 and 8. 1

In Fig; l'of the drawings a stand 10 is shown'on which a pipe 11 is mounted for rotation in.-both vertical and horizontal planes. One end of pipe 11 is provided with an elbow 12 to which a hose 13 is coupled, the other end being coupled to a pipe 14.- The hose 13 isv adapted'to carryan aqueous dispersion of fertilizer, seed, lime and 1 other solids, such as peat moss, supplied thereto by means 2,879,003 Patented Mar. 24, 1959 of a pump not shown. A nozzle 15, which comprises the inner member of the spray nozzle to be described infra, is coupled to pipe 14 as shown. Nozzle 15 maybe of standard firehose nozzle construction modified to meet the requirements of the spray nozzle 17 shown in Figs. 3 to 9 inclusive.

As shown more particularly in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, the spray nozzle 17 comprises the inner nozzle 15 and an outer barrel 18 having a nozzle 19 at its forward end having a nozzle chamber therein into which the inner nozzle discharges.

The inner nozzle 15 has a bore 20 that tapers uniformly from the base or inlet 21 to a location 22 from which point the bore converges on a slight taper t0 the discharge end thereof. The discharge end is provided with an annular flange 23 disposed at substantially right angles to the axis of the bore 20. The terminus of the passageway 24 is chamfered at 25. The nozzle 15 is also provided with a threaded stud 26 by means of whichthe barrel 18 may be secured thereto.

threading a nut 30 on the stud 26, the barrel is secured in position. I

'Ilie forward end of the barrel 18 is closed by means of a plate or washer 32 having an aperture 33 at the center thereof that is coaxial with the opening at the discharge end of nozzle 15. Preferably, the flange 23 has a relatively loose fit with barrel 18. As shown, the diameter of the aperture 33 is slightly larger than the diameter of the aperture in the flange 23. l

The aperture 33 leads into the nozzle 19 which is formed by a roof 35, a floor 36 and side walls 37 and 38.

The surfaces of the roof, floor and sides should be made each other by welding or other suitable means and at their rear ends to the closure 32 as by welding. As shown in Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6, the roof 35 and the floor 36 diverge from the outer ends thereof to the member 32. Also as shown in Figs. 3, 5 and 6, the edges of the roof and floor converge towards member 32 from a plane or location 41 to the member 32. Thus the flow passage from the member 32 to the location 41 converges as between the roof and the floor 35 and 36, respectively, and diverges as between the walls 37 and 38, respectively.

The nozzle above described including the nozzle of Figs. 7, 8 and 9 is capable of handling high solids content aqueous dispersions. For example the solids of the dis persion may be comprised of 500 pounds of lime, 500 ,pounds of fertilizers and several hundred pounds more or less seed and two bales of peat moss in one thousand gallons of water. The solids concentration on a weight basis may vary from 10% to 20% depending on the seed, fertilizing and condition job to be done.

When an aqueous dispersion of the type disclosed supra is supplied to the hose 13 and to the pipes 7 and 14, the same flows through the inner nozzle member 15 and discharges into the chamber of nozzle 19. As shown, the longitudinal axis of the nozzle 19 is substantially colinear with the longitudinal axis of the bore 20.

Therefore, the velocity head of the dispersion in the bore 20 will be efiective in the chamber of nozzle 19. The shape of the chamber of nozzle 19, however, slows down the velocity of the dispersion and causes it to issue from orifice .42 as a relatively wide ribbon. The form and shape of the chamber of nozzle 19 determines to a large extent the carry of the dispersion. Thus if the carry is to be substantial say of the order of 50 to 75 feet or more, a nozzle chamber shape of the type shown in Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6 is used. Since the stream issuing from the orifice 42 has a substantially flat pattern, it is relatively easy to cover a soil area thoroughly without any substantial overlapping or without skipping areas.

Since member 23 has a relatively loose fit with the inner bore of the barrel 18 and is spaced rearwardly of member 32 to provide a space of the order of A3 to A of an inch, the discharge end of the inner nozzle does not have a fluid-tight fit with the member 32 of barrel 18. Therefore, flow of air can be induced into the barrel 18 from the rear thereof into the chamber of nozzle 19 to produce an aerating efiect on the suspen sion discharging from the nozzle. The aerating action is desirable in that it tends to soften the stream issuing from the nozzle and thereby decrease erosion when striking the ground being seeded.

In Figures 7, 8 and 9, a modified form of nozzle 17 is shown. The nozzle dilfers from the one shown in Figures 3, 4 and 5 in the form and shape of the nozzle chamber. Since the inner nozzle and the barrel into which it extends are identical except for the chamber 19, similar and corresponding parts will be designated by the same reference characters with primes afiixed.

The barrel 18 is provided at its forward end with a nozzle 45 having a chamber formed by an upwardly arched roof 46, a relatively flat slightly downwardly sloping floor 47, and sides 48 and 49. The inside surfaces of the floor, roof and sides should be made smooth and free of ridges. The edges of the roof and floor 46 and 47, respectively, diverge from the closure member 32 as shown more clearly in Fig. 7. The sides 48 and 49 are secured at the edges to the edges of the roof and floor as by welding or other suitable means. The tips of the roof and floor are spaced to provide an orifice 50 which is relatively narrow, quite wide and substantially rectangular in shape.

Since the chamber of nozzle 45 diverges from the aperture 33' towards the outlet orifice 50, and since the roof 46 is arched upwardly, and the floor slopes downwardly, the carry of the fluid or aqueous dispersion is not as great as that of the chamber of nozzle 19 shown in Figs. 3 to 6 inclusive.

The aqueous dispersion discharging from the nozzle 15 strikes the arched roof 46 causing its velocity to be decreased. Furthermore, since the relatively loose fit of the member 23 with the bore of the barrel 18 allows air to be induced into the nozzle chamber 45, the suspension is aerated and softened by entrained air bubbles, so that it does not impinge on the ground with a harsh eroding effect, yet it has a carry sufiicient for the purpose. As the stream issuing from the orifice 50 has a ribbon-like pattern, being wide and relatively thin, the areas of soil to be covered by the spray can be accurately done without overlapping or the missing of areas.

A nozzle such as shown and described supra can be handled easily by an operator by means of a handle 51. The operator can raise or lower the discharge end of the nozzle 17 or 17', or he can swing it in a horizontal plane about a vertical axis.

The nozzle in both of its embodiments is one in which the size of the orifices 42 and 50 may be modified. If in practice it is found that these orifices have a tendency to plug up, they can be spread with a tool or a portion can be cut ofi the tips so as to increase the height of the orifices. This matter may conveniently be taken care of "in the field when the nozzle is in use.

Having thus described the invention, it will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art to which the invention pertains that various changes may be made in the illustrated embodiment without departing from either the spirit or the scope of the invention.

Therefore, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A nozzle for spraying aqueous dispersions of solids comprising an inner nozzle member having a tapered bore converging in its flow direction and adapted for connection to a source of supply of said dispersion under pressure, a barrel for receiving said nozzle, said barrel having a closure provided with an aperture substantially coaxial with the bore of the nozzle, the discharge end of the inner nozzle member being spaced from the closure of. the barrel and provided with a spacer to so hold the inner nozzle member that its bore axis is in line with the center of said closure aperture, the spacer having a loose fit with the inner wall of the barrel whereby air may be induced into the space between the inner nozzle and the barrel, and a nozzle chamber member secured to the forward end of the barrel, the air induced into the space between the inner nozzle and the barrel, discharging into the nozzle chamber member, the chamber member having a roof and floor and sides, the sides diverging from the apertured closure, and the roof and floor converging to form with the sides a relatively wide but narrow orifice. v

2. A nozzle for spraying aqueous dispersions of solids comprising an inner nozzle member having a tapered bore diverging in its flow direction and adapted for connection to a source of supply of said dispersion under pressure, the discharge end of the nozzle member being blunt and contained in a plane extending substantially at right angles to the axis of the bore thereof, a barrel for receiving said nozzle, said barrel having a closure provided with an aperture substantially coaxial with the bore of the nozzle, the discharge end of said nozzle member being spaced from the closure of the barrel and provided with a spacer to so hold the same that its bore 'axis is in line with the center of said closure aperture, the spacer having a loose fit with the'inner wall of the barrel whereby air may be induced into the space between the inner nozzle and the barrel, and a nozzle chamber member secured to the forward end of the barrel, the chamber member having a roof, floor and sides, the sides diverging from the apertured closure and the roof and floor converging to form with the sides a relatively wide but narrow orifice, the air induced into the space between the barrel and nozzle discharging into the nozzle chamber member.

3. A nozzle comprising a first nozzle member having a bore converging in its direction of flow, and having a discharge aperture, a secondnozzle member in substantial sealing engagement with said first nozzle member and provided with a tubular sleeve receiving the first-mentioned nozzle member and provided with means for effecting locking engagement therewith, said second nozzle member having an intake aperture in registration with the discharge aperture of said first nozzle member, and said second nozzle member diverging in its direction of fiow in one plane and converging in a plane normal to said first-mentioned plane to form a relatively wide but narrow discharge orifice.

4. A nozzle comprising a first nozzle member having a bore converging in its direction of flow and having a discharge aperture, a second nozzle member in substantial sealing engagement with said first nozzle member and having a tubular sleeve receiving the first-mentioned nozzle member and provided with means for effecting locking engagement therewith, said second nozzle member having an intake aperture in registration with the discharge aperture of said first nozzle member, and said second nozzle member having a roof, floor and sides, the

5 sides diverging from said intake aperture and the roof References Cited in the file of this patent and floor converging to form with the sides a relatively UNITED STATES PATENTS wide but narrow discharge orifice, said nozzle roof being arched upwardly from said intake orifice to said dis- 220,006 Sapt- 1879 Charge Orifice 5 242,871 Bradlsh June 14, 1881 2,047,378 Martin July 14, 1936 FOREIGN PATENTS 558,289 France May 23, 1923

Patent Citations
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US220006 *Mar 20, 1878Sep 23, 1879 Improvement in air and gas injectors
US242871 *Aug 16, 1880Jun 14, 1881 Geokge bradish
US2047378 *Feb 1, 1935Jul 14, 1936Bellevue Mfg CompanyMotor vehicle exhaust pipe extension
FR558289A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2985384 *Aug 22, 1958May 23, 1961Martin Byron HHose nozzle and the like
US3101906 *Jan 11, 1962Aug 27, 1963Webber Carl RSpray nozzle
US3211350 *Feb 13, 1961Oct 12, 1965William Brown AlbertPressure regulating valve and dispenser for carbonated beverages
US3881654 *Dec 3, 1973May 6, 1975Gates Rubber CoBattery paste pumping and metering system
US3961754 *Sep 12, 1975Jun 8, 1976Economics Laboratory, Inc.Spray and foam producing nozzle apparatus
US4071195 *Jun 7, 1976Jan 31, 1978Economics Laboratory, Inc.Spray and foam producing nozzle apparatus
US5975996 *Jul 17, 1997Nov 2, 1999The Penn State Research FoundationAbrasive blast cleaning nozzle
US6053420 *Mar 8, 1999Apr 25, 2000Abb Research Ltd.Dispersion apparatus and process for producing a large cloud of an electrostatically charged powder/air mixture
US7059543 *Mar 21, 2002Jun 13, 2006Dushkin Andrey LLiquid sprayers
US7484330Feb 10, 2006Feb 3, 2009Terra-Mulch Products LlcBlended mulch product and method of making same
US7681353Feb 10, 2006Mar 23, 2010Terra-Mulch Products LlcErosion control medium
US7966765Dec 24, 2008Jun 28, 2011Terra-Mulch Products, LlcBlended mulch product and method of making same
US8256158Jul 2, 2009Sep 4, 2012Profile Products LlcVisual attenuation compositions and methods of using the same
US8555544Jul 2, 2009Oct 15, 2013Profile Products L.L.C.Visual attenuation compositions and methods of using the same
DE19614192A1 *Apr 10, 1996Oct 16, 1997Abb Research LtdDispergiersystem für eine Pulversprüheinrichtung
EP0642842A2 *Sep 12, 1994Mar 15, 1995Illinois Tool Works Inc.Nozzle assembly
WO2012109288A1 *Feb 7, 2012Aug 16, 2012GeoTree Technologies, Inc.Method and apparatus for application of mortar
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/434.5, 47/9, 239/592, 239/525
International ClassificationB05B1/02, B05B1/04, A01C23/04, A01C23/00, B05B15/06, B05B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/02, B05B15/065, A01C23/042, B05B1/044
European ClassificationA01C23/04B, B05B15/06B, B05B1/02, B05B1/04F