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Publication numberUS2879023 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1959
Filing dateAug 24, 1955
Priority dateAug 24, 1955
Publication numberUS 2879023 A, US 2879023A, US-A-2879023, US2879023 A, US2879023A
InventorsFelix Barrier, George Schklair
Original AssigneeFelix Barrier, George Schklair
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drinking glass holder
US 2879023 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 24, 1959 F. BARRIER ETAL 2,879,023

DRINKING GLASS HOLDER Filed Aug. 24. 1955 FELIX BARRIER 8 BY GEORGE sch'kLA/R I w WkfijuJ/ wf EE 7 TT Y United States Patent DRINKING GLASS HOLDER Felix Barrier and George Schklair, Brooklyn, N.Y.

Application August 24, 1955, Serial No. 530,274

5 Claims. (Cl. 248-226) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in holders. More particularly, it is concerned with a drinking glass holder which, while it may be conveniently held in the hand, is especially designed so that it may be anchored over the arm rest of a' chair or other suitable support.

V The device has many advantages, and afiords a solution to the problem that so often arises as to where to rest ones drinking glass in a safe and convenient place without danger of it being spilled over. On a variety of occasions, and especially when entertaining, it is customary to serve refreshing drinks. Often, the drinking glass is momentarily rested, generally upon a table, or the floor for lack of a more suitable place. Very often the glass is tumbled and the contents spilled. Such accidents are not only embarrassing, but cause damage to rugs and furniture, and frequently are the occasion of injury from broken glass.

Further, setting a drinking glass on a table, or on the floor, is not a practical or convenient way of temporarily disposing of the glass. This is particularly so when one is seated and only wishes to momentarily rest his glass so that he may attend to some want, such as the turning of a page of a book or newspaper, the lighting of a pipe, or other need. The inconvenience of not having a proper place to set ones drinking glass under such circumstances can obviously become very annoying.

Now, the object of this invention is to provide a practical means for accommodating ones drinking glass in a convenient and safe place without danger of the glass being tumbled or its contents spilled.

A further object of the invention is that the means for accomplishing this purpose be simple in construction, attractive in appearance, and economical to make.

Now, we have. designed a holder to effect these purposes. Our holder comprises means for containing a drinking glass, as well as means for engaging the holder to a convenient support, such as the arm rest of an arm chair, particularly the living room upholstered type arm chair.

A feature of the holder is a handle having character.- istics of a clamp, whereby the holder may be held not only in the hand, but it may also be anchored securely over the arm of a'chair or other support.

A further feature of this invention is an adjustable handle, whereby the holder may be anchored to supports of various widths. i

The invention further lies in the particular construction and arrangement of its component parts, as well as their cooperative association with one another to effect the objects and advantages intended.

The advantages of the invention are, indeed, many. While some have been pointed out, the foregoing advantages and objects, as well as additional advantages and objects of this invention will appear more fully hereinafter from a consideration of the detailed description which follows, taken together with the accompanying Patented Mar. 24, 1959 drawings, wherein an embodiment of the invention is illustrated.

In the drawings, wherein like reference numbers represent similar parts,

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a holder embodying our invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view with some parts cut away;

Fig. 3 is a left end view of the tail portion of the handle;

Fig. 4 is a detail of the stop means;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of a modified form of the invention;

ice

Fig. 6 is a side detail further illustrating the connection of the handle with the receptacle;

Fig. 7 is a left end view of the depending tail portion":

of the handle; and

Fig. 8 is a side view of the tail portion of the handle.

In describing the invention in further detail, reference is now directed to the drawings, particularly to Figs. 1-4 wherein there is shown a drinking glass holder embodying the invention. The holder has a receptacle memberl It is open in its top end, and is formed with a base end or wall 2 on which 1 a drinking glass received in the receptacle may rest. The receptacle is of a diameter, preferably slightly greater than that of the glass member to be received therein, so

which is preferably cylindrical.

that the latter may be contained in the receptacle with a minimum of side play, and yet may be freely removed or entered therein. The height of the receptacle is desir'- ably less than that of the glass to be received therein,

and it is such that the upper portion of the glass will project sufficiently above the rim of the receptacle to enable the glass to be manually taken and removed.

Attached to the receptacle is a hook formed handle 3. I This enables the holder to be hooked over a suitable upholstered type chairs; such as, arm chairs, sofas and the like.

The handle is formed of a plurality of telescoped sections, spring tensioned into one another. It comprises a first section 4, horizontally disposed relative to the side wall of the receptacle. Projecting from the sides of this 1 section are pins 5. These are engaged in complementary holes of ears 6 projecting laterally from the upper portion of the side wall of the receptacle. Section 4 is hollow, and opens out at one end. Telescoped into this open end is a second horizontally disposed rectangular handle section 7 which also opens out at one end. Telescoped into this open end is a horizontally disposed rectangular portion 8 of a tail section, the tail 9 of which bends over and depends downwardly.

The handle sections are tensioned in telescoped relation by spring elements 10, 11.

end of section 7. Spring 11 is anchored at one end 15 in section 7 and at the other 16 to the nose end of the tail section. To simplify assembly of the springs, a hole 13 is provided in each of the sections 4 and 7 directly below the point of connection of the spring at its inner end. The hole permits easy access of a fine tool for anchoring the hook in place. Stops 17 limit the extent to which the respective sections may be drawn into one another. This serves to maintain the several sections in a tensioned relation to one another and thereby avoids looseness and unnecessary play in the handle. Bearing The Spring 10 is anchored at one end 12 to section 4 and at the other 14 to the nose 3 detents 18 (Fig. 4) in sections 4 and 8 are engageable in complementary dimples 19 in respective sections 4 and 8 to curb the extent to which the several sections may be withdrawn.

The several handle sections serve to space the tail end 9 of the handle a predetermined distance from the wall of the receptacle, so that by sliding the sections of the handle slightly outward the handle may be fitted over and clamped upon an arm rest of conventional thickness. It is clear, that the handle may be slidably expanded against the tension of the springs therein to accommodate arm rests as well as other supports of various widths.

t is to be noted that the end wall 20 of the first sec tion abuts the side wall of the receptacle and that it is relatively thick, sutficiently so to prevent pivoting of the receptacle on the handle engaging pins 5. By this arrangement the receptacle maintains a vetrical position rel ative to the horizontally disposed handle. It is, of course, understood that the pins may be fixed in their sockets or the handle section 4 formed unitary with the side wall of the receptacle.

It is also to be noted that the handle is here sevenformed, characterized by the horizontally disposed sections and the slightly inwardly inclined tail piece 9. This construction further insures a tight clamp and sure anchorage of the handle upon its support. This form of the handle is further particularly suited to the conventional chair arm rest 29 that is characterized by a substantially flat top surface and slightly inwardly inclined side walls.

In associating the holder with an arm chair, the handle is clamped over the arm rest, preferably, in such direction that the receptacle overhangs the outside of the arm rest. In this arrangement, the holder does not interfere with free movement of the person occupying the chair, and yet, provides to him a place where he may conveniently locate his drinking glass without danger of the latter being tumbled or spilled.

The holder may be fashioned of various materials, including metal and plastics. When formed of plastics, as here, added novelty is presented, in that plastics are not only light and inexpensive but can be made in a wide variety of attractive colors.

In Figs. 5-8 is a modified form of the invention. In this form each handle section 21, 22 and 23 is formed of parallel spaced tubular elements 24. The latter are telescoped into one another, and are tensioned in this arrangement by springs 25, 26. The springs are shown in the tubular elements 24 on the right, and are similarly contained in corresponding elements on the left.

.The receptacle is removably engaged to the first handle section 21 by means of book elements 27 which engage in complementary holes in the tubular elements 24 of section 21. The hooks have vertically depending portions 25 which project through the tubular elements, and by this arrangement serve to hold the receptacle in a vertical position relative to the handle.

While an embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described in detail, it is to be expressly understood that the invention is not limited thereto. Various changes can be made in the design and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as the same will now be understood by those skilled in the art; and it is our intent, therefore, to claim the invention not only in the forms shown and described, but also in all such forms and modifications as may reasonably be construed to be within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Means for supporting in vertical position a drinking glass to arm rests of various thicknesses of arm chairs, comprising a vertically disposed cylindrical receptacle open in its top end for receiving the drinking glass therein, a handle characterized by a first rectangular tubular section attached at one end to the side of the receptacle in proximity to the rim and extending at right angles therefrom, a second rectangular tubular section telescoped into the first section, a spring anchored between opposed ends of the first and second sections constantly urging the two sections into telescoped relation, a third section having a rectangular portion telescoped into the second section and having a tail piece depending in opposed substantially parallel relation to the receptacle, and

a spring anchored between opposed ends of the second section and the rectangular portion of the third section urging the latter sections into telescoped relation with one another, the several sections being extensible against the urging of the springs so as to accommodate arm rests of various thicknesses between the depending tail piece and the opposed receptacle.

2. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein a projection on the second section cooperates with an end wall of the first section so as to limit the extent to which the two sections may be drawn by the related spring into telescoped relation, and a similar projection on the rectangular portion of the third section cooperates in similar manner with the second section.

3. Means for supporting in vertical position a drinking glass to arm rests of various thicknesses of arm chairs, comprising a vertically disposed receptacle open in its top end for receiving the drinking glass therein, a handle characterized by a first tubular section attached at one end to the side of the receptacle in proximity to the rim and extending at right angles therefrom, a second tubular section telescoped into the first section, spring means anchored between opposed ends of the first and second section-s constantly urging the two sections into telescoped relation, a third section having an end portion telescoped into the second section and having a tail piece depending in opposed substantially parallel relation to the receptacle, and a further spring means anchored between opposed ends of the second section and the end portion of the third section urging the latter sections into telescoped relation with one another, the several sections being extensible against the urging of the several spring means so as to accommodate arm rests of various thicknesses between the depending tail piece and the opposed receptacle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,409,936 Falkiner Mar. 21, 1922 1,485,223 Greene Feb. 26, 1924 1,805,015 Schulze May 12, 1931 1,863,988 Kupfer June 21, 1932 2,438,633 Condor Mar. 30, 1948 2,444,447 Josselyn July 6, 1948 2,711,213 Owens June 21, 1955 2,711,636 Howell June 28, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1409936 *Jun 8, 1921Mar 21, 1922John Falkiner EdwardHandle for trunks, kit bags, and the like
US1485223 *May 11, 1923Feb 26, 1924Greene Charles AAsh-tray mounting
US1805015 *Oct 4, 1929May 12, 1931Schulze Alfred LSadiron holder
US1863988 *Sep 30, 1929Jun 21, 1932Theodore W KupferAsh tray for automobiles
US2438633 *Nov 17, 1944Mar 30, 1948Condor JohnExtensible tool shank
US2444447 *Apr 18, 1945Jul 6, 1948Winsor JosselynHinged handle for utensils
US2711213 *Jun 4, 1951Jun 21, 1955Owens Samantha CFood container for vehicles
US2711636 *Aug 16, 1950Jun 28, 1955Kendall CorpChild's dish
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3160438 *Sep 18, 1961Dec 8, 1964Paul G DavisHolder for books and the like
US3319916 *Aug 31, 1965May 16, 1967Malicoat Robert CCan holder
US3635431 *May 18, 1970Jan 18, 1972Charlie Dwain MarinerBottle holder
US3776387 *Feb 28, 1972Dec 4, 1973B BrentPortable stand with magnetic bar surgical instrument holder for use on an operating cart or table
US3807674 *Dec 15, 1972Apr 30, 1974Justen CContainer holder
US4629153 *Dec 13, 1984Dec 16, 1986Alfred MarcumContainer holder device
US5056696 *Sep 10, 1990Oct 15, 1991Richard LahrBeverage container holder
US5857601 *Mar 18, 1997Jan 12, 1999Graco Children's Products, Inc.Beverage holder for a stroller or the like
US5873555 *Mar 19, 1997Feb 23, 1999Rbi, An Alaskan Limited PatnershipRimmed container mounting assembly
US8240079Feb 1, 2007Aug 14, 2012Moto, LlcFishing pole tender system
US8690166 *Mar 26, 2007Apr 8, 2014Target Brands, Inc.Cup holder for a shopping cart
WO1998041133A1 *Mar 18, 1998Sep 24, 1998Rbi An Alaskan Limited PartnerRimmed container mounting assembly and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/231.41, 248/311.2, D07/620
International ClassificationA47G23/00, A47G23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47G23/0225
European ClassificationA47G23/02A2B