Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2881441 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 14, 1959
Filing dateDec 23, 1954
Priority dateDec 23, 1954
Publication numberUS 2881441 A, US 2881441A, US-A-2881441, US2881441 A, US2881441A
InventorsBass Helen L
Original AssigneeGeorge W Prince, Walter T Bass
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arm bag
US 2881441 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 14, 1959 Filed Dec. 23, 1954 H. L. BAss. 2,881,441

ARM BAG 2' Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig. 2

Helen L. Bass INVENTOR.

BY WWW My H. L. BASS April ,1959

M BAG 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 25, 1954 He/en L. B ass IN V EN TOR.

9 BY waazm ARM BAG Helen L. Bass, Chicago, Ill., assignor of fifty-one percent to George W. Prince and ten percent to Walter T. Bass, both of Chicago, 111.

Application December 23, 1954, Serial No. 477,155

' 2 Claims. (Cl. 2-1

This invention relates in general to new and useful improvements in ladies bags, and more specifically to an improved arm bag.

The primary object of this invention is to provide an improved arm bag which includes a sleeve portion intended to be received over the forearm of a wearer whereby removal of the arm bag from ones arm is quite diflicult and thereby purse snatching is practically eliminated.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved arm bag which is provided with a multiplicity of pockets wherein one has numerous places in which money can be carried so as to prevent one from quickly ascertaining where money is being carried in a persons handbag so as to foil the possible robbery of such money.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved arm bag which is so constructed whereby it may be conveniently formed out of odds and ends of material and quickly sewed together on a conventional sewing machine.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved arm bag which includes suitable article retaining means in the form of straps secured to a portion thereof whereby articles which are in constant use, such as cigarettes, may be conveniently carried for quick access.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an improved bag for ladies which is so constructed whereby it maybe formed as a part of a garment.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of'construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numeralsrefer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure l is a perspective view of a preferred form of the present invention and shows the same carried on ones arm, the persons alrm' being shown by broken lines;

Figure 2 is an enlarged elevational view of the arm bag of Figure 1 with portions thereof broken away in order tolearly illustrate the arrangement of pockets of the b Figure 3' is an enlarged fragmentary perspective .view withf-pofrtionsjof the corner of the arm bag being disconnec'tedin or'der'to clearly illustrate the manner in which a triangular piece is placed in the corner of the bag to increase the carrying capacity of the bag;

Figure 4 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 44 of Figure 2 and shows the details of the sleeve portion of the arm bag and the relationship of pockets carried thereby;

Figure 5 is an enlarged transverse horizontal sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 5-5 of Figure 2 and shows the details of pockets carried by a bag portion of the arm bag;

Figure 6 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 66 of Figure 2 and shows the general arrangement of all of the pockets carried by the arm bag;

2,881,441 Patented Apr. 14, 1959 Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view tak en substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 7-7 of Figure 2 and shows the details of a corner construction of the arm bag; and

Figure 8 is a rear elevational view of a slightly modified form of arm bag and shows the same formed as a part of ones garment.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it will be seen that there is illustrated in Figures 1 through 7, inclusive, a preferred form of arm bag which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 10. The arm bag 10 includes a sleeve portion which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 12, and a bag portion which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 14.

Referring now to Figure 6 in particular, it will be seen that an outer or rear side 16 of bag portion 14 is disposed at one end of a single piece of material which is looped to form the sleeve portion 12 and which extends downwardly in face to face relation with the inner surface of the outer side 16 to form an outer side 18 of an inner pocket 20 disposed within the bag portion 14. A single piece of material also is folded as at 22 to form the bottom of the pocket 20 and extends upwardly to form an inner side 24 of the pocket 20. The inner side of the bag portion 14 is formed by a separate strip, the inner side being indicated by the reference numeral 26.

Referring now in detail to the construction of the back portion 14, it will be seen that the lower ends of the sides 16 and 26 are folded to form hems 28 and 30, respectively. The hems 28 and 30 are secured together by suitable stitching 32 to form the bottom of the bag portion 14.

As is best illustrated in Figure 5, the sides 16 and 26 are provided at opposite side edges thereof with hems 34 and 36, respectively, which are inwardly directed and connected together by a stitching 38.

In order to increase the carrying capacity of the bag portion 14, there is disposed in the lower corners thereof between the sides 16 and 26 triangular pieces of material 40. As is best illustrated in Figures 3 and 7, the triangular'pieces of material 40 are folded upon themselves as at 42 and along vertical edges thereof to form hems 44 and'46. The hems 44 and 46 are connected to the hems 34 and 36 by a suitable stitching 48 and 50, respectively. The lower edge of each triangular piece 40 is also folded upwardly and inwardly to form a hem 52. The hem 52 is secured by suitable stitching 54 to both of the hems 28 and '30.

The sides 18 and 24 of the pocket 20 are connected together along their side edges and end bottom portions by suitable stitching 56, as is best illustrated in Figures 2 and 3. The upper portion of the side 24 is also secured to the side 26 by suitable stitching 58. Further, the upper end of the side 24 is folded to form a hem which is disposed in opposed relation to a hem 62 formed at the upper edge of the side 24. Disposed between the hems 60 and 62 is a separable fastener half 64, the hems 60 and 62 and the separable fastener half 64 being secured together by suitable stitching 66.

Referring once again to Figure 6 in particular, it will be seen that the upper portions of the sides 16 and 18 are connected together by suitable stitching 68 and 70, the stitching 68 and 70 closing the loop which forms the sleeve portion 12. The stitching 70 also secures to the side 18 an upper separable fastener half 72 and a lower portion of a covering strip 76. The upper portion of the covering strip 76 is secured to the side 18 by the stitching 68.

It is to be understood from the above description of the pocket, that access to the interior thereof is controlled by the separable fastener of which the halves 64 and 70 form parts. Also, it should be readily apparent that the pocket :20 is permanently secured to the back portion 14 but may be Substantially removed therefrom for cleaning or other purposes.

Disposed within the confines of the pocket 20 is a patch pocket 78. The patch pocket 78 is formed of a single piece of material which is folded along its edge to form a hem 80 and is secured to the wall 18 by suitable stitching 82.

In order that articles which are constantly used, such as a package of cigarettes (not shown) may be conveniently carried by the arm bag, there is secured to the wall 26 first article retaining means which are referred to in general by the reference numeral 84. The article retaining means 84 is a pair of spaced, generally parallel strips 86 which are secured to the wall 26. Extending between the strips '86 is an elastic strap 88. The elastic strap 88' is intended to have received therebeneath a package of cigarettes or the like for retaining the same in position on the'bag 10. 1-

In order that a nursing bottle or a larger article may be conveniently carried by the hand bag exteriorly thereof, there is secured to the wall 26 second article retaining means which are referred to in general by the reference numeral 90. The article retaining means 90 include a pair of spaced generally parallel strips 92 which are relatively elongated and secured to the side 26. Secured to the lowermost one of the strips 92 and extending upwardly therefrom is a plurality of elastic straps 94. The upper ends of the elastic straps 94 are removably secured to the upper strip 92 by suitable separable fasteners 96.

If desired, the bag portion 14 may have secured to the side 16 thereof a patch pocket 98. The patch pocket 98 is provided with a separable fastener 100 for selectively closing the same, the upper half of the separable fastener 100 including an ornamental covering strip 102.

Referring now to Figure 4 in particular, it will be seen thatthe sleeve 12 is provided at one end thereof with an ornamental trim 104. The trim 104 is formed of a single piece of material having the edges thereof folded to form ends 106 which are in opposed relation. The hems l06are disposed on opposite sides of an end of the strip of material forming the sleeve 12 and secured thereto by suitable stitching 108.

The opposite end of the sleeve portion 112 is in the form of a cuff 110. The cuff 110 is formed of a single piece of material which is folded upon itself along longitudinal edges to form hems 112. The hems 112 are disposed in opposed relation on opposite sides of the material: forming the main part of the sleeve portion 12 and aresecured thereto by suitable stitching 114.

Referring once again to Figure 4, it will be seen that there is disposed within the confines of the ornamental trim 104 an elastic band 116. A similar elastic band 118 is disposed within the cufi 110. The elastic bands 116 and 118 facilitate the retention of .the sleeve portion IZ'in'a fixed'position on ones arm, as illustrated in Figurel.

In order to increase the carrying capacity of the arm bag 10, there is carried by the sleeve portion 12 an elongated patch pocket 118. The patch pocket 118 is normally enclosed by a separable fastener 120 andincludes an upper portion 122 secured to the sleeve portion 12.

The upper portion 122 is in the form of an ornamental is a relatively small patch pocket 126. The patch pocket 126 is secured to the patch pocket 118 by suitable stitching 128.

The sleeve portion 112 has also carried thereby adjacent the cuff 110 a relatively small patch pocket 130. The

patch pocket 130 is formed'of a single piece of material and is secured to the sleeve portion 12 by a suitable stitching 132.

Referring now to Figure 8 in particular, it will be seen that the sleeve portion 12 of the arm bag illustrated therein, the arm bag being referred to in general by the reference'numeral 134, forms an integral part of the sleeve 136 of a garment. Other thanthe fact that the sleeve portion 12 is integral with-a sleeve of a garment, the arm bag 134 is identical in construction with the arm bag 10.

Fromthe foregoing, the construction and operation of the device will be readily understood and further explana tion is believed to be unnecessary. However, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the irivention to the exact construction shown and described, and accordingly, all suitablemodifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. An arm bag comprising a sleeve portion receivable over a wearers forearm, and a bag portion integrally connected to and depending from said sleeve portion, said bag portion being provided with an inner pocket, said inner pocket having an upper part only connected to said bag portion whereby said pocket is movable out of-the general confines of said bag portion for cleaning and the like while being permanently attached to said bag portion, a single piece of material forming said sleeve portion, one wall of said bag portion and said inner pocket. 2. An arm bag comprising a sleeve portion receivable over a wearers forearm, and a bag portion integrally connected to and depending from said sleeve portion, said bag portion being provided with an inner pocket, a single piece of material forming said sleeve portion, one wall of said bag portion and all of said inner pocket.

, References Cited .in the .file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,019,993 Regal Nov. 5., 1935- 2,223,0'29 Dunton Nov. 26, 1940 2,383,217 Schatfer Aug. 21,1945 2,459,992 Cimin'o Jan. 25, 1949 2,614,260 Lipshitz Oct. 21,1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2019993 *Oct 27, 1934Nov 5, 1935Sam RegalScarf holder for garments
US2223029 *Jan 26, 1939Nov 26, 1940Marjorie DuntonCombination glove and receptacle
US2383217 *Apr 16, 1943Aug 21, 1945Schaffer Jacob ISecret garment pocket construction
US2459992 *Jun 6, 1946Jan 25, 1949Thomas D CiminoSleevelet purse
US2614260 *Jan 27, 1950Oct 21, 1952Abraham LipshitzMultiple pocket panel construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3180641 *May 15, 1962Apr 27, 1965Shane Wesley SExercising device for marksmen
US5671481 *Jul 12, 1996Sep 30, 1997Giard; B. JoanFolding sweatband with interior compartment
US5845826 *Nov 27, 1996Dec 8, 1998Nguyen; Hue VanArm pouch accesory and the method for using same for the delivery of mail
US6330961 *Apr 15, 2000Dec 18, 2001Anita Arriola BorjaForearm mounted storage pouch for securing articles and utilizing a personal communicator
US8602073 *Jan 18, 2011Dec 10, 2013Tammy L SwainMulti-use convertible forearm purse
US20120138651 *Feb 10, 2012Jun 7, 2012Tamara Yvonne KryklywiczWearable pocket
US20120180916 *Jan 18, 2011Jul 19, 2012Swain Tammy LMulti-use convertible forearm purse
DE102011090138A1 *Dec 29, 2011Jul 4, 2013Nadine JentschHandbag, has pocket body comprising cut-outs on two sides near upper edge, and tubular slip elements releasably arranged in one cut-out by slide fastener or hook-and-loop fastener and consisting of wool and synthetic materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/1, 224/222, 224/235, 224/245, D02/614
International ClassificationA45C3/06, A45C3/14, A41D27/00, A45C3/00, A41D27/10
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/10, A45C3/06, A45C3/14
European ClassificationA41D27/10, A45C3/14