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Publication numberUS2881450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 14, 1959
Filing dateMar 13, 1958
Priority dateMar 13, 1958
Publication numberUS 2881450 A, US 2881450A, US-A-2881450, US2881450 A, US2881450A
InventorsTubbs Elton H
Original AssigneeTubbs Elton H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System for the electrical control of flush tank operations
US 2881450 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 14, 1959 E. H. TUBBS 2,

SYSTEM FOR ELECTRICAL CONTROL OF FLUSH TANK OPERATIONS Filed March 13, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 WM a mg Ma INVENTOR.

AT TORNEY m, H. Tablas,

x 1 im QT April 14, 1959 EH. TUBBS f 2,881,450

SYSTEM FOR THE ELECTRICAL CONTROL OF FLUSH TANK OPERATIONS v 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 13, 1958 INVENTOR.

Paw 1-' o N 3 :1 BY

9 I ATTORNEY I I Elfonfi. Tublis,

April 14, 1959 E. H TUBBS I ,4 9 SYSTEM FOR THE ELECTRICAL CONTROL OF FLUSH TANK QPERATIONS Fil ed llarqh 13 1958 Sheets-Sheet 15 IN VENTOR.

E1101? H. Tubbs,

W ATTORNEY.

April 14, 1959 v E.'H. TUBBS Y 2,881,450

SYSTEM FOR THE." flEcTRIcAL CONTROL O FLUSH TANK OPERATIONS Filed March 13, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 AT TORNEK United States Patent SYSTEM FOR THE ELECTRICAL CONTROL OF FLUSH TANK OPERATIONS Elton H. Tubbs, Westfield, N.

Application March 13, 1958, Serial No. 721,168 9 Claims. (Cl. 4-67) This invention relates to a system for the electrical control of flush tank operation.

The flush tank includes the usual operating features, namely: the flushing water discharge pipe leading from the tank to the toilet bowl and having a valve seat at its upper end, the valve normally resting upon the seat in closing relation and responsive to manual actuation in opening relation; the overflow pipe having its lower end connected to the discharge pipe at a point below the valve seat; the upright water supply pipe connected at its lower end to the water supply line; the water' inlet pipe operatively connected to the upper end of the supply pipe for discharging water into the flush tank at a point adjacent its bottom; the inlet valve at the upper ends of the supply and water inlet pipes and which governs their communication; and the fioat which moves downward when the flushing water is discharged and upward as the tank is refilled and is operatively connected to the inlet valve whereby during its downward movement it causes the opening of the inlet valve and at the completion of its upward movement causes the closing of the inlet valve. The flush tank may also include the feature of the ventilating equipment which forms the subject of my pending application for patent, Serial No. 697,001, filed November 18, 1957, in which case the system of electrical control which constitutes the invention provides for the operation of the ventilating equipment in proper sequence with respect to the operation. of the usual flush tank features above summarized.

The objects of the invention are to provide for a much more rapid filling of the flush tank, the slow acting mechanically operated valve heretofore used being eliminated; substantially to eliminate noise in connection with the filling of the flush tank, the inlet valve remaining fully open until the determined normal water level is reached at which time it is instantly and noiselessly closed; to facilitate repairs by the provision of operating parts which are easily and inexpensively replaceable as compared with the mechanical parts of the known flush tank constructions; to provide a system of electrical control which, serving the foregoing objects, may be readily applied to existing flush tanks and readily incorporated with new flush tanks in the course of their manufacture; and to provide such a system in which the operations of the various features are initiated by a push button means and thereupon at all times maintained under the control of the float which upon the refilling of the flush tank is operative to restore all circuits to their normal open condition.

With the above objects in view the invention is a combination of elements which includes a solenoid connected by a suitable linkage to the ball valve, a second solenoid which actuates the water inlet valve in opening and closing, an actuating circuit for the first solenoid which is closed by a push button switch, a holding circuit for the first solenoid under the control of the float and closed in connection with the closure of the actuating circuit by the push button switch, and an actuating circuit "ice for the second solenoid, also under the control of the float which is closed at or just prior to the completion of the flushing with resultant energization of the second solenoid, thereby to effect the opening of the water inlet valve, the float at the completion of the refilling of the tank being operative to restore all circuits to their normal open condition. When the flush tank includes the ventilating equipment a separate push button switch is provided for closing the actuating circuit of the motor which operates the impeller. This circuit is also tied in with a holding circuit simultaneously effective upon the operation of the push button switch and under the control of the float, being opened at the completion of the flushing operation.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view of a flush tank equipped with my system of electrical control, this figure assuming a previously installed flush tank modified by my system of electrical control.

Figure 2 is a vertical transverse section on the line 22 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a plan view of a shelf which provides support for the electrical features.

Figure 4 is a detail sectional view showing the water inlet valve in relation to the water inlet pipe and the water supply pipe and also showing the solenoid for the actuation of the inlet valve in its closing and opening functions.

Figure 5 is a perspective view showing details of mercury switches which are under the control of the float.

Figure 6 is a wiring diagram which assumes in addition to the usual flush tank features the added feature of the ventilating equipment and which also assumes that all circuits are in their normal open position.

Figure 7 is a perspective view showing one of a pair of similar brackets used in the construction shown in Figure 1.

Figure 8 is a perspective view showing one of a pair of similar brackets used with new flush tanks in the course of their manufacture.

Figures 9 and 10 are related side elevations of a switch organization including a lever and mercury switches, these views showing the switches in their normal posi tions and being taken at the same side of the lever.

Figures 11 and 12 are similar views showing the reverse positions of the mercury switches.

Figure 13 is a partial plan view with the flush tank cover removed and showing more particularly the boxes for certain relay solenoids and for a transformer.

Figure 14 is a wiring diagram showing the circuit conditions during the .upward movement of the float.

Figure 15 is a wiring diagram showing the initiating circuit for the energization of a relay solenoid utilized for closing the actuating circuit which controls the operation of the ball valve associated with the flushing water discharge pipe.

Figure 16 is a wiring diagram showing the holding circuit which maintains the energization of the relay solenoid shown in Figure 15.

Figure 17 is a wiring diagram which includes the circuits shown in Figures 15 and 16.

The flush tank T is a body having vertical end walls 1, vertical side walls 2, a bottom wall 3 and the usual removable cover 4 and encloses the usual operating features, namely: the flushing water discharge pipe 5 which leads from the tank to the toilet bowl and within the tank has a valve seat 6 at its upper end; the ball valve 7 responsive in opening to manual actuation and normally resting upon the seat 6 in closing relation to the upper end of the pipe 5; the overflow pipe 8 having its lower end connected by an elbow 9 to the discharge pipe 5 at a'point below the valve seat 6 and adjacent the bottom '3; the upright water supply pipe 10 connected at its lower end to the water supply line 11; the water inlet pipe 12 arranged for communication with the upper end f, the supply pipe and at its lower end discharging into the flush tank at a point adjacent the bottom 3; the water Waive organization designated generally as 13 at the upper ends of the supply pipe and the water inlet pipe 12 and which governs their communication; and the heat 14 which moves downward when the flushing water is discharged and upward as the tank is refilled and is operatively connected to the inlet valve whereby during its downward movement it causes the opening of the inlet valve and at the completion of its upward movement causes the closing of the inlet'valve.

As shown and preferred the flush tank includes the ventilating equipment which forms the subject of my pending application Serial No. 697,001. The principal element of the ventilating equipment is a .tubular body B of metal or suitable plastic which includes a vertical element '15 formed near its lower end with a laterally projecting ,goosenec'k 16 with which it is in open com munication, the gooseneck 16 at its open free end normally projecting into the water in the tank for a suitable distance below the normal level X and, in the event of any impairment whereby the water level rises above the predetermined normal, conducting the water to the overflow pipe. The element has an open lower end fashioned for slip-joint engagement as indicated at 17 with the upper'end of the overflow pipe 8, the element 15 and the pipes 8 and 5 constituting a continuous airflow conduit. The element 15 is formed with an opening 18, preferably just above the gooseneck, to accommodate the tube 19 which conveys the water of the after-flow and in this instance extends from the water inlet pipe '10 and communicates with the overflow pipe 8, the water of the after-flow via the pipes 8 and 5 filling the toilet -bowl to the level prescribed by the usual trap. The ventilating equipment also includes a blower 20. The element 15 'at its upper end is in open communication with the casing of the blower 20, for this purpose having a lateral extension 21 to which the blower is preferably attached. The casing of the blower is formed with the 'usual tangential discharge pipe 22 which may lead to the usual stand pipe (not shown) or in rooms where a stand pipe is not provided may extend through a wall of the room and discharge to outside atmosphere. The impeller of the blower is connected to the shaft of an electric motor 23, the casing of which is preferably attached to the casing of the blower as a support. With the blower 20 attached to the extension 21 and the motor "23 attached to the blower 20 the ventilating equipment is in the form of .a complete assembly which may be sold as such.

The drawings in Figures 11 and 2 .assume aflush tank of standard dimensions and originally equipped with standard operating features and [further assume the utilization of such flush tank in association with the electrical features of "the invention. In .this instance these electrical features, with the optional inclusion of the ventilating equipment, are elements of a unit U which includes a shallow rectangular frame F having vertical walls 24 and 25 which rest upon and form continuations of the flush tank walls 1 and 2 respectively. The flush tank cover 4 rests upon the walls of .the frame F which constitutes a functional :part of the flush tank per se. The end walls 24 .of the .frame F are provided along their lower edges with angle brackets 26 which have supporting flanges 2.7 for beating engagement upon the upper edge faces 'ofthe walls 1 and serve a twofold purpose, namely to prevent displacement of the frame F relatively to the flush tank T: and to support a horizontal shelf 28 which forms .an element .of the .unit U at an elevation which provides a :suificient clearance 29 below the cover 4 for the accommodation of the electrical features to be later described. In the case of flush tanks of original manufacture the vertical walls have vertical dimensions which equal the combined vertical dimensions of the above described flush tank walls 1 and 2 and the corresponding walls 24 and 25 of the frame F. In thi latter instance angle brackets 26a (Figure .8) are provided for the support of the shelf 28 and are formed with supporting flanges 27a for bearing engagement upon the upper edge faces of the vertical end walls of the .flush tank, the vertical legs of the brackets 26a being of a depth to support the shelf 28 at substantially the same elevation in which it is supported by the brackets 26, that is to say the elevation which provides the clearance 29 below the cover 4. In both instances the she1f28 is of the same construction and the electrical features are of the same construction and relative arrangement.

The electrical features are a solenoid 30 which controls the position of the ball valve 7, a solenoid 31' (Figure 4) which forms a part of the water inlet valve organization 13, the motor 23 for the operation of the blower of the ventilating equipment, a switch organization 32 under the control of the float 14, and push button switches 33 and 34, the button 33 initiating the operation of the motor 23 and the button 34 initiating the operation of the solenoid 30. The switches 33 and '34 may have any suitable location, that is to say theymay, as shown herein, be mounted upon a wall of the flush tank or they may be mounted upon a wall of the room within convenient reach of the occupant.

The shelf 28 (Figure 3) extends between the end walls of the tank and, as shown in Figure 2, its transverse dimension is substantially less than the transverse dimension of the tank whereby longitudinal clearances 35 are provided between the side edges of the shelf and the side walls of the tank, these enabling the hand to be inserted into the tank below the shelf for access to any of the individual parts below the shelf if occasion should arise. The shelf is attached by screw fastenings to the angle brackets 26 (or 26a) and provides .direct support for the solenoid 30, the inlet valve organization 13 and the blower 20, these parts being secured to the shelf by suitable screw fastenings which are sufliciently suggested in Figure 3 by the showing of the openings 36 for the shanks of the screws. The pipes 10 and 12 extend through openings 37 in the shelf and are formed at their upper ends with elbows 38 which serve for their connection to the valve organization 13. 'The shelf also has an opening 39 for the accommodation of the vertical element 15 of the body B, an opening 40 for the accommodation of the chain 41 which forms an element of the linkage between the solenoid 30 and the valve 7 and an opening 42 for the accommodation .of a vertical stem 43 upon which the float 14 has downward and upward movement.

The linkage between .the solenoid .30 and the ball valve 7 includes a bell crank .lever 44 having its vertical arm 45 pivotally connected to the solenoid armature 46 and its horizontal arm 4.7 connected to the .chain 41. The lower end of the chain 41 is connected to .a stem 48 carried by and upright from the ball valve 7 and movable through the sleeve of a guide bracket 49 secured in any suitable manner to the overflow pipe .8. The lever 44 has a fixed pivotal connection to a supporting bracket 50 attached by screw fastenings to the shelf .28. When the solenoid 30 is energized the armature 46 is moved inward, that is to .say to the right, Figure 1 being considered, and in such movement, through the lever 44 and the chain 41, .lifts the valve 7 from its SE31 6 and thereby initiates the flushing operation. When the solenoid 30 is deenergized the valve 7 drops by gravity to its position upon the seat 6 and restores the lever 44 and the armature 46 to their normal positions as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 4 exemplifies a suitable form of the'water inlet valve organization 13. The parts are enclosed in a casing 51 having tubular extensions 52 and 53 for connection to the elbows 38 of the respective pipes and 12. The casing 51 is provided with an internal passage 54 in communication with the extension 52 and with an internal passage 55 in communication with the extension 53. A web 56 extends in separating relation between the passages 54 and 55 and is formed with an opening 57 normally closed and which when uncovered enables communication between the passages. The opening 57 is fashioned to provide a tapering seat 58 for a conformably shaped valve element 59. The valve element 59 is mounted at the lower end of the armature 60 of the solenoid 31 and is normally biased to closed position by water pressure supplemented by a spring 61. The casing 51 is also provided with a shelf 62 which supports the coil of the solenoid 31 and has an opening through which the armature 60 extends. When the solenoid is energized the armature 60 is moved downward against the-combined pressure of the water and of the spring 61, the valve element 59 at such time uncovering the opening 57 to provide for a free flow of water from the pipe 10 through the extension 52, the passage 54, the opening 57, the passage 55 and the extension 53 to the inlet .pipe 12. The solenoid 31 is energized to move the element 59 to open position at or shortly prior to the completion of the flushing operation and remains energized until the tank is refilled to the normal level X at which time the solenoid is deenergized and the valve element 59 is moved to its closed position. The closure of the element 59 is instantaneous and noiseless, hammering being prevented by a surge chamber 10a communicating by a connection 10b with the pipe 10 and providing an air cushion which is effective in connection with the closure of the valve element 59.

The switch organization 32 under the control of the float 14 includes a two-armed lever 63 pivoted at a suitableintermediate point to a bracket 64 carried by the shelf 28. One arm of the lever 63 (which may be called the inner arm) is pivotally connected to the upper end of the stem 43 which is in depending relation within the tank. The other arm of the lever 63 carries a pair of mercury switches 65 and 66 which for convenience may be called first and second switches and are so arranged that when either of them, according to the position of the lever 63, is in circuit closing position the other is in circuit opening position. The switches 65 and 66 are carried by laterally projecting spring clips 67 (Figure 5) attached to the opposite sides of the lever 63 and constructed to provide for the ready insertion or removal of;the mercury switches as occasion may require. The first switch 65 controls the holding circuits involved in the operation of the solenoid 30 and the motor 23 and the second switch 66 controls the circuit involved in the operation of the solenoid 31. i

The float 14 is freely slidable upon the stem 43, its movement being responsive to changes in the water level consequent upon the flushing and refilling operations. The movement of the float is between upper and lower collars 68 and 69 mounted upon the stem 43, the collar 69 being at the lower end of the stem. During the flushing operation the float moves downward until it engages the collar 69 at which time, its downward movement being continued, it efiects a downward movement of the stem 43 to a limit prescribed by the engagement of the inner end of the lever 63 with the shelf 28. In the normal position of the lever 63 (Figures 1, 9 and 10) the mercury switches 65 and 66 have a downward and outward inclination; and in the reverse position of the lever 63 (Figures 11 and 12) they have a downward and inward inclination. The lever 63 in connection with its associated parts is so balanced that it remains in either of its positions during the movements of the float along the stem 43. Near the end of its upward movement the float engages the collar 68 and efiects an upward movement of the stem 43 to a limit prescribed by the normal water level X, the tank at such time being completely refilled and the inlet valve element 59 being moved to its normal closed position.

The various circuits are shown in the wiring diagram of Figure 6.

The actuating circuits of the motor 23 and solenoids 30 and 31 carry current at 110 volts. The current for the several holding circuits is supplied at a suitably reduced voltage, for example six volts. The line current at 110 volts is reduced to six volts by a transformer 70, the current for the holding circuits flowing through the secondary winding 71.

The operation of the motor 23 is initiated by the push button switch 33 which closes an associated holding circuit for maintaining the closure of the actuating circuit, the holding circuit being likewise closed by the push button switch 33 and, of course, remaining closed after the push button switch 33 is released. The holding circuit for the actuating circuit of the motor 23 includes a relay solenoid 72 having an armature 73 which carries a contact 74 for engagement with stationary contacts 75 and 76 for the completion and maintenance of the motor actuating circuit.

The current for the operation of the electrical features is supplied by a line wire 77 connected to the primary winding 78 of the transformer 70 and flowing back to source by wire 79 and return line wire 80. The circuit through the primary of the transformer is closed at all times but since the primary acts as a choke coil the flow of current is negligible, being of the order of one-fourth of one percent of the output of the transformer.

When the button of the switch 33 is pushed inward the actuating circuit for the operation of the motor 23 is closed as follows: The coil of the solenoid 72 being energized (as explained infra) and the contact 74 being in engagement with the stationary contacts 75 and 76 the 110-volt current flows from the line wire 77, through wires 81 and 82, contacts 75, 74 and 76, wire 83, motor 23 and wires 84 and 85 to return line wire 80.

The push button of the switch 33 carries a contact 86 for momentary engagement with stationary contacts 87 and 88. The button 33 is held by spring biasing means (not shown) in the normal position in which the contact 86 is disengaged from the contacts 87 and 88. When the button 33 is pushed inward to establish the engagement of the contact 86 with the contacts 87 and 88 an initiating circuit for the energization of the coil of the solenoid 72 is closed as follows: From the secondary 71 through wires 89 and 89a, contacts 88, 86 and 87, wires 90 and 99, coil of solenoid 72, wires 91 and 92, mercury switch 65, and wire 93 to the secondary 71.

The armature 73 of the solenoid 72 carries a second contact 94 for engagement with stationary contacts 95 and 96. When the push button 33 is released and returns to its normal position wherein its contact 86 is disengaged from the contacts 87 and 88 the energization of the coil of the solenoid 72 is continued by a holding circuit as follows: From the secondary 71, through the wires 89, 97 and 98, contacts 96, 94 and 95, wire 99 to coil of solenoid 72, wires 91 and 92, mercury switch 65 and wire 93 to secondary 71.

The energization of the solenoid 72 is efiective through the contact 74 to close the above described actuating circuit for the motor 23 of the blower 20; and, through the holding circuit described in the preceding paragraph, the actuating circuit of the motor 23 is maintained closed until the flushing of the' tank is completed consequent to the operation of the push button switch 34, the mercury switch 65 the while remaining in its circuit closing position as shown in Figures 1 and 9.

Upon the occupation of the seat the push button of the switch 33 is actuated to initiate the operation of the ventilating :feature, this :operation continuing until the :substantial completion of the :flushing operation.

When the tank is :to .be flushed the solenoid .30 is energized with resultant lifting .of the valve 7 from its seat 6. For this purpose the occupant pushes the swltch button 34 which carries a contact 100 for engagement with stationary contacts 101 and 102. The button 34 .is held by spring biasing means (not shown) in a normal position in which its contact 100 is disengaged from the contacts 101 and 102. When the button 34 is pushed inward for the momentary engagement of its contact 100 with contacts 101 and 102 the actuating circuit of the solenoid 30 is closed and, upon the release of the button 34, is maintained closed by a holding circuit. The closure of the actuating and holding circuits is effected by a relay solenoid 103 having an armature 104 which, for the closure of the actuating circuit, is provided with a contact 105 for engagement with stationary contacts 106 and 107 and for the closure of the holding circuit is provided with a second-contact108 for engagement with stationary contacts 109 and 110. The actuation of the button 34 energizes the'coil of the solenoid 103 through a circuit which is detailed in Figures 15 and 17 and may be-traced as follows: ,From the secondary 71 through wires 89 and 89a, the contacts 101, 100 and .102, the wires 88a and 116, the coil of the solenoid 103, the wire 92, the mercury switch 65 and the wire 92 back to the secondary 71.

The actuating circuit of the solenoid 30 is traced as follows: From the line wire 77 through the wires 81 and 111, contacts 106, 105 and 107, the wire 112, coil of solenoid 30, and wires 113, 114 and 85 to the return line wire 80.

The holding circuit for the energization of the relay solenoid 103 is detailed in Figures 16 and 17 and may be traced as follows: From the secondary 71, through the wires '89, 97 and 97a, the contacts 109, 108 and 110, the wires 115 and 116, the coil of the solenoid 103, the wire 92, the mercury switch 65, and the wire 93 back to the secondary 71.

Figure '13 shows a box 117 in which the transformer 70 is mounted and a box 118 in which the solenoids 72 and 103 and associated switch .elements are mounted, these boxes being supported inany suitable manner from the front wall of the frame F or from the front wall of the tank if originally constructed in accordance with the invention.

The circuits above described are of course maintained during the descent of the float 14 along the stem 43. Upon its engagementwiththe collar 69, the discharge of the water from the tank being .then in progress, the float effects a downward movement of the stem 43 and thereby moves theilever 63 to reverse the positions of themercury switches, that .is :to say to move them to the positions shown in Figures 1.1 and .12 and in the wiring diagram of Figure 14. This reversal of the positions of the mercury switches .is efiected at .any appropriate period during the flushing operation. vAt such time the circuits above described are broken at the switch 65 with the result of the .deenergization of the solenoids 72 and 103 and the movement .of their armatures to normal position in which the several circuits are also broken at the contacts '74, 94,

105 and 108. At the same timeacircuitis closed through the mercury switch 66 :for the .energization of the solenoid 31 in consequence of which the valve element 59 is moved to open position and water is delivered into .the tank from the pipe 12. When the valve 7 returns to its seat at the completion of the flushing operation, the solenoid 30'at such time being deenergized, the .water delivered by the pipe 12 refills the tank to the normal level X, the float moving upwards the while. Just prior to the completion of the refilling operation the float engages the collar 68 and, its upward movement continuing, raises the stem 43 and returns the lever 63 to its normal position shown in viFigure 1 in which the holding circuits are con- 8 ditioned for closure 'by the mercury switch 65, these circuits remaining broken, however, at the several contacts 74, 94, 105 and 108. When the lever 63 is returned to its normal position the circuit of the solenoid 31 is broken at the mercury switch 66 and the valve element 59 is returned :to its normal closed position, thereby cutting off the supply of water to the tank.

Referring .-to Figure 14 the circuit for the solenoid 31 which is closed when the mercury switch 66 is moved to its reverse position may be traced as follows: From the wire 77 through the wire 119, the mercury switch 66, the wire 120, coil of the solenoid 31 and the wires 121, 114 and back to thereturn line wire 80.

ItwilLofJcourse, be understood that any suitableswitch, unnecessary to illustrate, .may be provided externally of the tank .for breaking the circuit through the primary 78 of the transformer if this, for any reason, should be desired.

In resum: If the :flush tank .be provided with-the ventilating equipment the occupant of the seat imme- .diately presses the button of the switch 33 with resultant energization of the coil of the solenoid 72 and closure of the actuating circuit of the motor 23, the holding circuit in which the coil 72 is included being maintained closed until the completion of the flushing operation. Forthe flushing operation the occupant of the seat presses the button of the switch 34 with resultant closure of the actuating circuit of the solenoid 30 and the associated holding circuit. Upon the energization of the solenoid 30 the valve 7 is lifted from its seat and :the water in the tank flows through the discharge pipe 5. Thereafter all operations are under the control :of the float '14 which .at the completion of its downward movement elfects the breaking of the actuating and holding circuits .of the motor 23 and the solenoid 30 and the closure 'ofthe circuit of the solenoid 31 with resultant opening of the inlet valve element 59, water flowing into the tank for the refilling operation and the float moving upward. At the completion of its upward movement the float effects the breaking .of the circuit of the solenoid 31 with the resultant closure of the inlet valve 59, allcircuits at such time v(except the circuit through the primary 78) being restored to their normal broken condition and being in readiness for a repetition of the flush tank operations consequent to the successive operations of the push button switches 33 and 34.

I claim:

1. For use with a flush tank having a tank body, a flushing water vdischarge pipe terminating within the tank body in a valve seat, a ball valve normally resting upon the seat and closing the discharge pipe, 2 water supply pipe, .a water inlet pipe which discharges into the tank body, a .normally closed inlet valve element controlling the flow of water from the supply pipe to the inlet pipe and a float operatively connected to the valve elementfor governing its opening and closing movements, .2. system for the electrical control .of the flush tank operations comprising, in combination: ;a .first solenoid, .a mechanical linkage between its armature and the ball valve, the movement vof its armature being transmitted .by the linkage tothe ball valve, a second solenoid having its armature connected to the inlet valve element and operative upon the energization of its coil to move the inlet valve element to its open position, the valve element being .re-

' turned to and held in its normal closed position .upon

the deenergization of the coil of the second solenoid, a pair of first and second switches having normal positions in which the first switch is in circuit closing relation .and the second switch is in circuit breaking relation and having reverse positions in which the first switch is in circuit breaking relation and the second switch is in circuit closing relation, connections between the fioat and the switches operative at the completion of the movements of the float to move them to a particular position, the switches being :moved to their normal position at the completion of the upward movement of the float and to their reverse position at the completion of the downward movement of the float, a step-down transformer, line wires in circuit with the primary winding of the transformer, a normally open actuating circuit for the first solenoid which includes the line wires, a normally open actuating circuit for the second solenoid which includes the line wires and is closed through the second switch at the completion of the downward movement of the float and is broken at the second switch at the completion of the upward movement of the float, a normally deenergized relay solenoid, the armature of which has a first contact normally in circuit opening position and operative upon the energization of the relay solenoid to close the actuating circuit of the first solenoid, a push button switch normally in open position, an initiating circuit for the energization of the relay solenoid which includes the said first switch and the secondary winding of the transformer and is closed by the actuation of the push button switch, the armature of the relay solenoid having a second contact normally in circuit breaking position and a holding circuit for the relay solenoid which remains closed upon the release of the push button switch and includes the said first switch, the secondary winding of the transformer and the second contact and upon the energization of the solenoid is closed by the second contact, the float at the completion of its downward movement efiecting the movement of the first switch to its reverse position and thereby causing it to break the circuits within which it is included with resultant deenergization of the relay solenoid and the movements of the first and second contacts to circuit breaking positions and effecting the movement of the second switch to circuit closing position with resultant energization of the second solenoid, the float at the completion of its upward movement returning the first switch to its normal circuit closing position in which the circuits within which is is included are conditioned for closure by the actuation of the push button switch and returning the second switch to its normal circuit breaking position with resultant deenergization of the second solenoid.

2. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 1 in which the first and second switches are mounted upon an arm of a two-armed lever, a stem is pivotally connected to the other arm of the lever and is pendent within the tank body, the float is freely slidable upon the stem, and the stem is provided with upper and lower collars for engagement by the float in the course of its movements along the stem, the float by such engagement eflecting movements of the stem with resultant movements of the lever from one position to another.

3. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 2 wherein the first and second switches are mercury switches.

4. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 1 wherein the mechanical linkage includes a bell crank lever having an arm pivotally connected to the armature of the first solenoid and connections between its other arm and the ball valve, the movements of the bell crank lever consequent to the energization and deenergization of the first solenoid efiecting opening and closing movements of the ball valve.

5. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 1 wherein the flush tank body carries a cover and a shelf is supported by end walls of the flush tank body at an elevation below the cover which provides a clearance, the solenoids, the transformer, parts of the mechanical linkage, the first and second switches and parts of the connections between them and the float being mounted within the clearance and in certain instances connected to and supported upon the shelf.

6. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 5 wherein the shelf is of less width than the distance between the side walls of the tank body and is arranged to provide a clearance between it and an adjacent side wall through which access may be had to the parts within the tank body below the shelf.

7. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 1 wherein the water supply pipe is in communication with a surge chamber which provides an air cushion effective to prevent hammering upon the closure of the inlet valve element at the completion of the upward movement of the float.

8. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 5 which includes a unit comprising a removably mounted frame forming a part of the flush tank body and having vertical walls for supporting engagement upon corresponding fixed vertical wall parts of the flush tank body, the shelf and brackets carried by walls of the frame and having flanges for the support of the shelf.

9. A system for the electrical control of flush tank operations as set forth in claim 1 wherein the flush tank includes an overflow pipe connected at its lower end to the flushing water discharge pipe at a point below the valve seat and ventilating equipment comprising a tubular body having a vertical element connected at its lower end in communicating relation with the overflow pipe, a gooseneck carried by and communicating with the vertical element and terminating below the normal water level, a blower communicating with the tubular body and connected to the upper end of the vertical element, and an electric motor for operating the blower, the motor being in an actuating circuit which includes the line wires, a second normally deenergized relay solenoid, the armature of which carries a contact for closing the actuating circuit of the motor, a circuit for energizing the coil of the second relay solenoid which includes a second normally open push button switch, the said first switch and the secondary of the transformer, and a circuit for maintaining the energization of the second relay solenoid and which includes a second contact upon its armature, the secondary of the transformer, the said first switch and the coil of the second relay solenoid.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,342,716 Johnston June 8, 1920 1,683,062 Bright Sept. 4, 1928 1,709,083 Littlefield Apr. 16, 1929 1,908,009 Bogle May 9, 1933 2,717,396 Chiles Sept. 13, 1955 2,738,448 Bokser Mar. 13, 1956

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3082433 *Mar 11, 1960Mar 26, 1963O B Armstrong & SonWater closets
US3121880 *Feb 24, 1959Feb 25, 1964Leonard LeclairDual control toilet flusher
US3134404 *Feb 27, 1961May 26, 1964William B JaspertElectro-magnetically operated floating armature valves
US3334359 *Aug 30, 1965Aug 8, 1967Weingartner AdamVariable time delay valve for flush tanks
US3590397 *Jun 20, 1969Jul 6, 1971Omron Tateisi Electronics CoAutomatic flushing device for toilet facilities
US3781923 *Jul 27, 1971Jan 1, 1974Gaggenau EisenwerkVentilating system for a water closet
US4031574 *Jun 17, 1976Jun 28, 1977Werner Frank DTimed ventilator for toilets
US4583250 *Sep 4, 1985Apr 22, 1986Valarao Bonifacio CDevice for the removal of foul air from toilet bowls
US5325544 *Nov 27, 1992Jul 5, 1994Busch Michael SToilet flush tank and bowl air deodorizing apparatus
US5369810 *Dec 2, 1992Dec 6, 1994Warren; H. RayMalodorous air entrapment apparatus
US5394569 *Mar 21, 1994Mar 7, 1995Poirier; PaulAir venting apparatus for WC
US5896591 *Feb 20, 1997Apr 27, 1999Horan; Daniel G.Toilet air freshener
US20100095446 *Dec 18, 2009Apr 22, 2010Sustainable Source, LlcToilet Bowl Water Level Indication
EP1607531A1 *Jun 18, 2004Dec 21, 2005Chih Chen YenAutomatic flush apparatus for a toilet tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/353, 4/213, 4/381
International ClassificationE03D5/10, H01H35/18, E03D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01H35/18, E03D5/10
European ClassificationE03D5/10, H01H35/18