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Publication numberUS2882898 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1959
Filing dateMar 28, 1955
Priority dateMar 28, 1955
Publication numberUS 2882898 A, US 2882898A, US-A-2882898, US2882898 A, US2882898A
InventorsRalph R Holmes
Original AssigneeRalph R Holmes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Supporting means for needles for intravenous injections
US 2882898 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 21, 1959 R. R. HOLMES 2,882,893

Q SUPPORTING MEANS FOR NEEDLES FOR INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS Filed March 28, 1955 Q in 2 Y 5 FIG.1 F|G 4 M FlG.5

INVENTOR Zn FW United States Patent SUPPORTHIG MEANS FOR NEEDLES FOR INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS This invention relates in general to equipment for intravenous injections and relates more particularly to supporting means forthe needles utilized in'such injections.

The use of intravenous injections of different fluids is quite common today, for both intravenous feedings and transfusion of blood. In such injections, the fluid to be injected is fed from a bottle or other container through a length of flexible tubing to a hypodermic needle communicating with the veing into which the fluid is to be injected, usually in the patients arm. Since the injection may extend over a considerable period of time, it is de sirable that the needle and tubing be quite securely and stably attached to the injection area so as to permit some freedom of movement of the patients aim without interference with the injection. Heretofore, the needle has been secured to the injection area by lengths or strips of adhesive tape passing over the needle and secured to the skin area adjacent thereto. However, this method has the disadvantages that, owing to the relatively small cross-sectional area of the needles, the adhesive has a minimum of contact with the needle, and the needle is accordingly not securely held in one position. Consequently, movement of the patients arm. often causes. the needle to puncture the veing again, with a resultant leakage of fluid and blood and the attendant hazard and discomfort to the patient.

The disadvantages may be overcome in accordance with the present invention by utilizing a supporting member which is attached to the needle and which has a base section extending from the needle to provide supporting means in contact with the skin area adjacent the injection site. More particularly, the present invention contemplates a supporting member for a needle used in intravenous injections having a clamping section which clampably surrounds at least a portion of the needle and a base section extending from the clamping section to rest on the skin area adjacent the injection site and provide a relatively large surface to which an adhesive member may be aflixed. In one form of the present invention, the supporting member comprises a clamping section of generally U-shaped configuration, with the U- shaped portion inverted and clamped or clipped on the hub of the injection needle. The base section comprises a pair of leg members extending laterally on either side of the needle and preferably disposed at an acute angle to the longitudinal axis of the needle. These leg members rest on the skin surface adjacent the injection site and have a sufliciently large surface in contact with the skin to insure that when adhesive is placed over the leg members and adjacent skin, the supporting member and the needle will be securely and stably aflixed to the injection area.

The supporting member is preferably of unitary construction as an aid in manufacture, and may be made of any suitable material such as plastic, rubber, or metal. The material preferably has sufiicient resilience so that the clamping section may be made slightly smaller than ice v the portion of the needle to which it is to be clamped 1 and 2m supporting a and may be enlarged and slipped over the needle to provide for quick attachment and yet insure firm contact with the supporting member and the needle.

In an additional form of the invention, the needle and supporting member are fabricated as a unitary structure, with a base section extending from the needle hub or other suitable portion to form supporting means adapted to rest on the skin adjacent the injection area.

Additional features of the invention will be apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which,

Fig. 1 is a top view of one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is an end view of the device illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 illustrates the operation of the device of Figs.

tion;

, Fig. 4 is a top view of an alternate embodiment of the present invention; and

Fig. 5 is an end view of the device illustrated in Fig. 4. Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 by character of reference, number 11 designates generally one embodiment of the supporting member of this invention. Member 11 comprises a central clamping section 12 having a generally U-shaped cross-section for clamping to a portion of an injection needle. As shown in Fig. 2, the legs of the U in section 12 preferably converge slightly at their ends so that when the supporting member is slipped over the needle, the clamping section firmly engages the needle. Member 11 further comprises a base of a pair of leg members 13 extending from clamping section 12 and adapted to rest on the skin adjacent the injection site. As shown in Fig. 1, leg members 13 are preferably disposed at a fairly acute angle to the longitudinal axis of the needle.

Fig. 3 illustrates the disposition and operation of the embodiment illustrated in injection in a point of the body designated by reference number 14. The fluid to be injected is fed from a suitable container (not shown) through a length of flexible tubing 15 to an injection needle 16 which penetrates the skin and is in communication with the vessel into which the fluid is to be injected. Needle 16 is of the type provided with a hub portion 16a of generally square or rectangular cross section over which the clamping section 12 of member 11 is adapted to fit. Needle 16 also has a shank portion 16b having a passageway therethrough communicating with the chamber in hub 16a and the hollow needle portion 160. In the particular embodiment illustrated in Fig. 3, tubing 15 fits into an opening in hub portion 16a.

Supporting member 11 is attached to needle 16, with clamping section 12 firmly engaging the hub portion 16a, and leg members 13 rest on the skin adjacent the injection site. One or more strips of adhesive 17 are then passed over leg members 13 and needle portion and secured to the patients skin. Since leg members 13'present a relatively large surface for engagement with adhesive 17 and since needle 16 is firmly secured to supporting member 11, needle 16 is very stably secured to the injection area, thus permitting the patient some freedom of movement without interference with the injection.

The size of supporting member 11 relative to the size of the needle may vary within relatively wide limits in accordance with this invention, the important feature being that suificient surface area is available on leg members 13 to insure that the needle may be securely fixed to the injection area. Similarly, although the illustrated embodiments disclose the attachment of the clamping section to the needle at the hub thereof, it will be readily apparent that such attachment may be made at any other needle in an intravenous injec-- section consisting" Figs. 1 and2 in an intravenous 3 suitable portion of the needle or at the hubs of needles of different shapes by suitable design of the configuration of the clamping section, the'important feature being that the clamping section firmly engage the needle to provide the required stability. a Similarly the angle at which leg members 13 extend from clamping section 12 may vary within wide limits. In the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, leg members 13 are disposed at a fairly acute angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of needle 16, and I believe that this is the preferred disposition of these elements, since it affords a great deal of longitudinal and transverse stability to the assembly and permits the adhesive to be wrapped around the patients limb and be secured to both the needle and 'leg members 13. However, it will be understood that the leg members may be disposed in any other suitable manner, such as at right angles to or at an obtuse angle to the longitudinal axis of the needle.

Figs. 4 and illustrate an alternate embodiment of the present invention, involving a supporting member 21 having only one leg member in the base section. Member 21 is provided with a clamping section or portion 22 which, as before, is provided with a generally U-shaped cross-section, with the legs thereof converging to firmly grip the needle hub or shank. A single leg member 23 extends from clamping section 22 and isadapted to rest on the skin adjacent the injection site to provide a relatively large surface to which adhesive may be aflixed to stabilize the needle during the injection.

The above description relates primarily to a supporting means which may be attached to conventional needles for the purposes stated, but it will be apparent that the present invention can also be embodied in a unitary construction comprising a needle and supporting leg members extending therefrom. That is, the device could be fabricated in the form of a unitary element with the base section extending from a suitable portion of the needle. In such a case, the leg member or members forming the base section could be secured to the needle portion 16c by welding or other means if desired.

Although but a few embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

Iclaim:

1. A device for attachment to a needle used in intravenous injections to provide supporting means to which an adhesive member may be secured comprising a clamping section adapted to resiliently clamp said needle, and

a base member comprising a pair of legmembers extending from opposite sides of. said clamping section at an acute angle to the longitudinal axis of said needle and adapted to rest on the skin adjacent the injection site to provide a relatively large surface to. which said adhesive member may be'attached for stabilizing said needle.

2. A device for attachment to a needle used in intravenous injections to provide supporting means to which an adhesive member may be secured comprising a resilient U-shaped clamping section adapted to resiliently clamp said needle, and a base member comprising a pair of leg members extending from opposite sides of said clamping section at an acute angle to the longitudinal axis of said needle and adapted to rest on the skin adjacent the injection site to provide a relatively large surface to which said adhesive member may be attached for stabilizing said needle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,474,322 Ducorron Nov. 13, 1923 1,929,843 Gaus Oct. 10, 1933 2,057,726 Landis Oct. 20, 1936 2,077,774 Rudder Apr. 20, 1937 2,402,306 'Iurkel June 18, 1946 2,449,882 Daniels Sept. 21, 1948 2,632,477 'Weibel Mar. 24, 1953 2,725,058 Rathkey Nov. 29, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 427,072 Great Britain Apr. 15, 1935 689,131 Great Britain Mar. 18, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1474322 *Sep 1, 1922Nov 13, 1923Ducorronrich Engineering CompaBottle holder
US1929843 *Dec 16, 1932Oct 10, 1933Gaus George EWire bale-tie
US2057726 *Aug 13, 1934Oct 20, 1936Landls Richard PBlood transfusion syringe
US2077774 *Feb 19, 1934Apr 20, 1937Rudder Fred FTransfusion apparatus
US2402306 *Oct 7, 1943Jun 18, 1946Turkel HenryRetaining guard guide for needles
US2449882 *Feb 8, 1947Sep 21, 1948Amy J DanielsHolder for intravenous apparatus
US2632477 *Jun 10, 1950Mar 24, 1953Curtis Lighting IncChannel strip with snap on holder
US2725058 *Dec 29, 1952Nov 29, 1955Rathkey Arthur SIntravenous needle
GB427072A * Title not available
GB689131A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4129128 *Feb 23, 1977Dec 12, 1978Mcfarlane Richard HSecuring device for catheter placement assembly
US4981475 *Feb 22, 1989Jan 1, 1991B. Braun Melsungen AgDevice for fastening a catheter
US5382239 *Apr 24, 1992Jan 17, 1995Becton, Dickinson And CompanyRepositional catheter fixation device
US6270480Oct 5, 1998Aug 7, 2001Cancer Technologies, Inc.Catheter apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/174, 128/DIG.260
International ClassificationA61M25/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2025/024, A61M25/02, Y10S128/26
European ClassificationA61M25/02