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Publication numberUS2883063 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1959
Filing dateMay 11, 1955
Priority dateMay 11, 1955
Publication numberUS 2883063 A, US 2883063A, US-A-2883063, US2883063 A, US2883063A
InventorsLouis Baren
Original AssigneeLouis Baren
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laboratory rack
US 2883063 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A ril 21-, 1959 LABORATORY RACK Filed May 11, 1955 f INVENTUR:

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Loud 1 5012 1222 United States Patent LABORATORY RACK Louis Baren, Chicago, Ill. Application May 11, 1955, Serial No. 507,620

Claims. (Cl. 211-78) This invention relates to racks for storing laboratory glassware such as graduated cylinders. More particularly this invention relates to improvements in such racks affording organized storage compartments for accommodating a plurality of objects such as glass cylinders of various sizes in inverted position for the draining and drying of the same.

It is will known that in the modern laboratory a large variety of equipment and apparatus is normally and frequently utilized. Various types of glassware, including graduated cylinders for measuring ingredients, chemicals and solutions are constantly used and re-used. Good laboratory practice dictates the immediate washing, rinsing, drying and accessible storage of each such graduated cylinder after every instant of use of the same. Convenient, organized, readily accessible storage of such graduates is essential since'the laboratory technician oftentimes, during experiment, analytical or production Work, requires the immediate use of a particular graduated cylinder although time or prevailing conditions prevent him from exercising any selective thought other than substantially automatic selection. Obviously only well-organized, systematic storage of such apparatus enables the technician to automatically select the desired graduated cylinder without waste of time or eifort.

Since it is likewise important that each graduated cylinder be ready for instant use without necessitating immediate preliminary cleaning or Washing to rid the same of any chemicals which it may previously have contained, it is equally important that the graduated cylinders be stored in such a manner that after washing they will antomatically drain and dry themselves without requiring the application of any auxiliary drying means such as towels or the like. Obviously the only practical way for accomplishing such drying and draining is by storing the graduated cylinders in an inverted position to permit any fluids to drain from the inverted open mouth of the same.

Since the graduates are made from glass, it is obvious that any storage means must be such as to provide safe storage with minimum breakage of the cylinders. Thus the cylinders must be retained in such a manner that they may not readily be inadvertently or accidently removed from the storage means, but notwithstanding this the cylinders must be readily accessible and easily removable when desired.

Heretofore various rather crude and oftentimes makeshift devices have been introduced from time to time attempting to provide satisfactory storage means for such graduated cylinders and the like. In most cases such devices have comprised wooden strips or boards with holes drilled in them of various sizes for accommodating the cylinders therein. Such devices have not proven to be very satisfactory and in most cases were incapable of universal application to accommodate varying conditions existing in laboratories of different types and sizes.

It is, therefore, an important object of this invention to provide a novel drainage, drying and. storage rack for.

ice

graduated cylinders which will overcome all of the disadvantages mentioned hereinabove.

Another object is to afford a revolving storage rack having means for accommodating a plurality of glass cylinders of varying sizes. An object relating thereto is to afiord a revolving support enabling instant selection of any size cylinder required.

A further object is to provide a supporting rack of the character described having convenient, organized storage compartments of varying sizes and located in convenient positions for storing therein in readily accessible inverted position a substantial number of graduated cylinders of various sizes.

Another object is to provide a rack of the type described which will store a maximum number of glass cylinders in a compact minimum area.

Still another object is to atford a laboratory rack of the character described made of long-lasting metal but coated with resilient cushioning material to insure against excessive breakage of the glass cylinders.

Still a further object is to provide a storage rack having means for collecting the drained liquids and exposing the same in such a manner that they readily evaporate.

Yet another object is to afford a storage rack for glass cylinders in which storage compartments are so arranged that regardless of the number or size of cylinders positioned therein, the rack is always substantially balanced so that it revolves readily at all times and is practically incapable of being tilted or upturned.

Yet a further object is to provide a rack for laboratory glassware of simple inexpensive construction, yet sturdy, attractive and highly functional.

With the foregoing and other objects in View which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, arrangement and a combination of parts hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and particularly pointed out in the appended claims, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion,

size and minor details of the structure may be made without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

For the purpose of facilitating an understanding of my invention, I have illustrated in the accompanying drawings a preferred embodiment thereof, from an inspection of which, when considered in connection with the following description, my invention, its mode of construction, assembly and operation, and many of its advantages should be readily understood and appreciated.

Referring to the drawings in which the same characters of reference are employed to indicate corresponding or similar parts throughout the several figures of the drawings:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a laboratory rack embodying the principles of my invention showing several graduated cylinders of various sizes, some in operational position and others in slightly raised position;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary partially-sectional elevational view showing certain details of construction;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a support base and shaft showing the same in inclined or tilted position;

Figs. 4-7 inclusive are diagrammatic views of the four shelves or racks illustrating the manner in which the storage compartments are staggered or arranged for balancing glass cylinders stored therein; and

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on the plane of line- 8-8 in Fig. 1 of the drawings and indicating a detail of construction.

Referring-to Fig. l of the drawings, reference numeral 10 indicates generally a glass cylinder support rack comprising a drum indicated generally by reference numeral ,12rotatably mounted on a vertically-extending shait v14,

3 said shaft supported by a base 16. A drainage pan 18 is likewise rotatably mounted on the shaft 14 and is positioned below the rack 12 and rests on the base 16.

The drum 12 may be formed with a plurality of tiers or shelves. In the embodiment chosen for illustration they are four in number, viz., 2t), 22, 24 and 26 arranged in spaced relationship one above the other as shown in Fig. l of the drawings.

Each of the shelves may be formed with a pair of concentric metal rings such as 28 and 30, with the bottom shelf 26 having three additional concentric rings 32, 34 and 36, each of successively smaller diameter.

The top ring 20 and the bottom ring 26 may each be formed with four equidistantly spaced radiating spokes such as 38, 40, 42 and 44 which extend from the outer ring 30 to a centrally apertured disc such as 46 positioned at the center of each of the shelves.

The top two shelves, 20 and 22, are further formed each with a centrally positioned ring 48 and four rings such as .50 equidistantly spaced and connected to the central ring 48 and the concentric ring 28. Four spokes such as 52 are further provided on shelf 22 connecting the outer concentric ring 30 to the inner ring 48. The purpose of the above-described construction will become apparent as the description proceeds.

A plurality of vertically extending rods 54 spaced equidistantly about the circumference of each of the circular shelves and connecting the same one to the other, may be provided as shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings. These rods 54 afIord bracing support for tying together all four of the shelves.

Protruding from the outer ring 30 of some of the shelves 20, 22, 24 and 26 are a plurality of novel graduate support members 56 which will now be described in some detail. Each of these support members 56 comprise lengths of wire rod bent in U-shaped formation to afford outwardly extending legs such as 58 and 60 connected by an integrally formed arm 62. It will be noted that the outer ends of the legs 58 and 60 are bent upwardly in an inclined plane as at 64 and 66.

It will further be noted in Fig. l of the drawings that the support members 56 of the construction described hereinabove are positioned only on the top shelf 20 and the third shelf 24. Positioned on the other two shelves are retaining members such as 68 of somewhat different construction. These retaining members 68 are similarly formed with outwardly protruding legs such as 70 but it will be noted that the ends of these legs 70, instead of being bent upwardly, are bent inwardly in the same plane at inclined angles as shown at 72. It will further be noted that the third shelf 24 in addition to having a number of support members 56 also has three retaining members 68 aflixed thereto. The purpose thereof will likewise become apparent as the description proceeds.

Referring now to Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings, it

will be noted that the bottom end of the shaft 14 is affixed to the base 16. This base may comprise a heavy metal ring 74 having a pair of straight rods such as 76 positioned diametrically across the same with the end of the shaft 14 affixed between the rods 76. The ends of the rods 76 are in turn aifixed as by Welding to the ring 74 at diametrically opposed positions as shown at 78. A pair of bent rods such as 80 are likewise joined as by welding at 82 to the base ring 74. It will be noted that the vertical plane in which the rods 86 lie is positioned at right angles to the plane of the rods 76. It will further be noted that these rods are bent with upwardly inclined segments such as 84 terminating in a horizontally disposed segment 86 which is positioned in spaced relationship with the base ring 76. The shaft 14 is braced and aflixed between the segment 86 of the rods 80 as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings.

The drip pan 18 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 14 over vthe base 16 as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 of the d awings. This .drip pan 18 is formed with acentrally raised portion 88 having the same configuration as the base wire rods 80. Thus it is formed with a horizointally disposed raised central bottom portion 90 with intermediate inclined portions 92 sloping downwardly and outwardly to an annular marginal bottom portion 94 and terminating in an outer upstanding wall 96. It will be obvious that such construction insures that the drained liquid runs down to the outer lowermost portion 94 of the pan. This being the most exposed portion of the pan, it is obvious that the liquid is more readily evaporated from this location in the drainage pan.

In assembling the rack, the shaft 14 is inserted through a central aperture 98 and the pan 18 is permitted to drop down until it is supported on the base 16. The drum 12 is then assembled or mounted on the shaft 14 by means of the central openings such as 100 formed in the discs 46. Again the apertures are sufliciently large so that the shaft 14 fits freely therethrough and permits ready rotation of the drum. The top end of the shaft 14 protrudes above the top disc 46 and the drum is retained thereon by means of a retaining nut such as 102 threaded thereover.

In order to insure free and easy rotation of the drum 12, a plurality of spacing washers such as 106 may be mounted on the shaft 14 between the bottommost disc 46 and the top segment 90 of the bottom of the pan 18.

Upon examining Fig. 1 of the drawings it will be noted that the support members 56 and retaining elements 68 are so positioned that each glass graduated cylinder C is mounted on the rack by at least one of each. In each case the top compartment is a support member 56 and the bottom compartment is a retaining element 68. Thus aligned below each support member 56 is a retaining element 68.

It will further be noted that the rings 50 of shelves 20 and 22 are aligned one with the other so that large graduates may be positioned therethrough and retained thereby with the mouth of the graduate resting on the bottom shelf 26. The additional concentric rings such as 32, 34 and 36 of the bottom shelf 26 afiord support for such large graduates.

In Fig. 8 of the drawings it will be noted that the entire drum is formed from steel rod material such as 110, which in turn is coated with a highly resilient cushioning material such as neoprene rubber 112. This of course afiords the necessary cushioned support for the glass cylinders which thereby insures against excessive breakage of the same. It will further be noted that the particular design of the storage compartment is such that the glass cylinders are readily positioned therein but securely retained without, however, interfering with the ready removal of the cylinder when desired.

From the above description and drawings it will be noted that I have provided a novel glass cylinder support made of strong durable steel rod material coated with a layer of resilient cushioning material such as neoprene rubber. The support is provided with a revolving drum having outwardly-protuding, readily-accessible, convenient storage compartments so organized as to make maximum efficient use of the available space and to provide designated relative positions for each size graduated cylinder. The rack is designed to accommodate cylinders ranging in size from 5 to 1.000 ml. The rack is further designed to provide efiective drainage, drying and storage means for laboratory graduated cylinders with a drainage pan made of rustproof material acting as a receptacle forcollecting the drained liquid from all of the cylinders mounted in the rack. The storage compartments are so arranged that the unit is always in balance regardless of the number or size of graduated cylinders positioned at any one time in said rack. Finally by affording a revolving rack of the construction described hereinabove, means is provided for compactly storing a maximum number of glass cylinders in a minimum of space and inthe most accessible position for the laboratory technician.

It is believed that my invention, its mode of construction and assembly, and many of its advantages should be readily understood from the foregoing Without further description, and it should also be manifest that while a preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described for illustrative purposes, the structural details are neverthless capable of wide variation within the purview of my invention as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A laboratory storage rack for graduated glass cylinders comprising a stationary base, a vertical shaft mounted on said base, a circular drainage pan having a centrally raised bottom and intermediate sloping portions adapted to conduct drainage water to an annular marginal outer trough, a storage drum rotatably mounted on said shaft above said drainage pan, said drum having a plurality of storage compartments adapted to securely store glass cylinders in inverted organized readily-accessible relationship, said drum comprising a plurality of steel rod shelves covered with neoprene rubber, each of said shelves comprising a plurality of concentric rings connected by radius rods, the top two of said shelves having a plurality of intermediately positioned rings, the rings of said lower shelf aligned with the rings of said upper shelf, said top and bottom shelves each having a centrally apertured mounting disc mounted at the center thereof, a plurality of support rods connecting said shelves in spaced relationship one above the other, each of said storage compartments comprising an upper supporting member and an aligned lower-positioned retaining member.

2. The laboratory storage rack of claim 1 in which each of said upper supporting members comprises a U- shaped member having a pair of outwardly protruding legs, the ends of said legs bent obliquely upwardly, and each of said retaining members comprises a U-shaped member having outwardly protruding members having end portions bent obliquely inwardly.

3. A laboratory storage rack for graduated glass cylinders comprising; a stationary base, a vertical shaft mounted on said base, a drainage pan rotatably mounted on said shaft and supported on a raised portion of said base, and a storage drum rotatably mounted on said shaft above said drainage pan, said drum comprising a plurality of open-work Wire shelves positioned one above the other in spaced relationship, said shelves designed to permit ready drainage from any one through any of the others into said pan, support means connecting said shelves together, a plurality of support members adapted to engage the inverted bases of said cylinders and a plurality of aligned lower-positioned retaining members adapted to embrace lower portions of said cylinders, said support members and retaining members extending and opening outwardly from the periphery of said shelves.

4. The laboratory storage rack of claim 3 in which 55 each of said shelves comprises a plurality of concentric metal rings spaced one from the other, the top two of said shelves having a plurality of intermediately positioned rings, the rings of said lower shelf aligned with the rings of said upper shelf to afford drainage storage space for large graduated cylinders.

5. A laboratory storage and drainage rack for graduated glass cylinders comprising a stationary base, a vertical shaft mounted on said base, a circular drainage pan having a centrally raised bottom and intermediate sloping portions rotatably mounted on said shaft and supported on a raised portion of said base, said sloping portions adapted to conduct drainage water to an annular marginal trough for facilitating evaporation thereof, a storage drum rotatably mounted on said shaft above said drainage pan, said drum comprising a plurality of rubber-covered steel rod shelves, each of said shelves comprising a plurality of concentric rings connected by radius rods, the top two of said shelves having a plurality of aligned intermediately positioned rings, the bottom of said shelves having a greater number of concentric rings, said bottom shelf and aligned intermediately positioned rings cooperating to provide a support shelf and retaining compartment respectively for large glass cylinders, a centrally apertured mounting disc mounted in the center of each of the top and bottom of said shelves, a plurality of support rods connecting said shelves in spaced relationship one above the other, a plurality of storage compartments mounted on the periphery of said shelves, each of said storage compartments comprising an upper supporting member and an aligned lower-positioned retaining member, each of said upper supporting members comprising a U-shaped member having a pair of outwardly protruding legs, the ends of said legs bent obliquely upwardly, and each of said retaining members comprising a U-shaped member having outwardly protruding legs, the ends of said legs bent obliquely inwardly, said support members adapted to support the base of a cylinder, said retaining members adapted to embrace a portion of the wall of said cylinder.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 322,600 Hazelton July 21, 1885 391,186 Parker Oct. 16, 1888 532,953 Grimes Jan. 22, 1895 663,838 White Dec. 11, 1900 929,897 Taylor Aug. 3, 1909 1,445,029 Orrill Feb. 13, 1929 1,712,577 Moffa May 14, 1929 1,743,570 Russian Jan. 14, 1930 2,163,865 Bitney June 27, 1939 2.707,566 Eaton et al. May 3, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 243,768 Germany Feb. 21, 1912 339,524 Italy Apr. 23, 1936

Patent Citations
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US322600 *Jul 21, 1885 Umbrella-displayer
US391186 *Oct 16, 1888 Territory
US532953 *Jul 3, 1894Jan 22, 1895 Rack for umbrellas or canes
US663838 *Jun 11, 1900Dec 11, 1900James Bert WhiteDisplay-stand.
US929897 *Jan 4, 1909Aug 3, 1909John Edgar TaylorDisplay-rack.
US1445029 *Sep 20, 1922Feb 13, 1923Orrill Edgar PImplement holder
US1712577 *Apr 13, 1928May 14, 1929Moffa John JPortable revolving motor-oil stand
US1743570 *Jun 18, 1927Jan 14, 1930Michael RussianShop-tool rack
US2163865 *Apr 21, 1938Jun 27, 1939Union Steel Prod CoDish draining rack
US2707566 *Jun 23, 1952May 3, 1955Charles EatonHosiery display stand
*DE243768C Title not available
IT339524B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3452880 *Aug 30, 1966Jul 1, 1969Wide Range Ind IncDisplay stand
US3854590 *Nov 20, 1972Dec 17, 1974Bender DWine rack
US4753340 *Jan 17, 1986Jun 28, 1988Jerry BlakemanDevice for storing and carrying medicine and other items
US6502707 *Aug 31, 2001Jan 7, 2003Andrew SullivanShoe carousel device
US8292096 *Oct 14, 2008Oct 23, 2012Thompson Alan SSpice rack for mini spice containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/78, D07/704, D24/228
International ClassificationB01L9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01L9/00
European ClassificationB01L9/00