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Publication numberUS2883690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 28, 1959
Filing dateMay 23, 1956
Priority dateMay 23, 1956
Publication numberUS 2883690 A, US 2883690A, US-A-2883690, US2883690 A, US2883690A
InventorsHoller Jr Edward J
Original AssigneeOwens Illinois Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid dispensing ball applicator
US 2883690 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 8, 1959 E; J. HOLLER, JR 2,883,690

FLUID DISPENSING BALL APPLICATOR Filed may 23, 1956 INVENTOR United States Patent FLUID DISPENSING BALL APPLICATOR Edward J. Holler, Jr., Toledo, Ohio, assignor to Owens- ]Jlinois Glass Company, a corporation of Ohio Application May 23, 1956, Serial No. 586,770 Claims. (Cl. --132.7)

This invention relates generally to an improved liquid dispensing package, and more particularly to an improved ball-type applicator and closure assembly for a liquid dispensing container.

An object of the present invention is the provision of a liquid dispensing package characterized by a ball-type applicator assembly, which permits the liquid contents of said package to be applied upon a selected surface in a smooth and uniform manner by the simple expedient of rolling the applicator lightly in contact with said surface.

Another object of the present invention is the provisionof a supporting fitment of unit construction for a ball applicator, simple in design, and capable of maintaining said ball applicator in secure assembled and spaced rela-' tionship relative to a liquid dispensing container.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a ball applicator assembly characterized in part by a ball having a resiliently deformable construction.

A particular object of the present invention is the provision of a ball-type applicator assembly comprising; a resiliently deformable ball applicator, a supporting fitment for said applicator, and a threaded closure for a dispensing container which is superimposable over said applicator and fitment, wherein said closure will cause said applicator to deform and mutually seal with said fitment as said closure is threadably secured to said container, and wherein upon removal of said closure from said container said seal will be broken, and said ball will resiliently resume its normal configuration and applicating position.

The specific nature of this invention, as well as other objects and advantages thereof, will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the annexed sheet of drawings on which, by way of preferred example only, are illustrated the various embodiments of this invention.

On the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a sectional elevational view in central section of the neck portion of a container, together with an improved ball-type applicator assembly and closure therefore; showing the functional aspect of the assembly and closure in its relative closed and assembled relationship.

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. l, but showing the functional aspect of the applicator assembly after the closure has been partially removed.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-3 in Fig. 2, the applicator ball being omitted for clarity of illustration.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but showing a modified form of the invention embodied in Figs. 1-3.

With reference to Fig. 2, there is illustrated the neck portion 10 of a conventional container suitable for retaining a liquid therein. The neck 10 has a generally cylindrical configuration, and define a dispensing opening 10a, illustrated in Fig. 1, extending axially therethrough and communicating with the hollow interior of the container. Integrally formed on the dispensing end of the neck 10, there is an outwardly protruding retaining lip 10b. Axially inward of the retaining lip. 10b an enlarged outer diameter portion 10c defines conventional external threads 10d.

A spherical ball 11, which may be constructed from plastic, rubber, or other suitable resiliently deformable material, is also provided for rolling liquid which may be dispensed from the neck 10 onto a selected surface, such as the skin of the human body. Preferably, the exterior surface of the ball 11 should have a relatively smooth and uniform outer surface substantially free from any sharp parting line or mold seam. To reduce material cost, this ball 11 preferably has a hollow construction, and may be fabricated from conventional blow molding. methods Well known to those skilled in the art. The use of a resilient plastic or rubber material will provide the ball 11, under proper fabricating procedures, with an applicating surface which may be rolled over the skin of the human body without discomfort and without the necessity of providing the surface of the ball 11 with an expensive ground and polished finish.

To maintain the ball 11 in an assembled and elevated dispensing relationship relative to the dispensing opening 10a, there is provided an annular ball fitment 12 which may be molded from plastic, rubber, metal, or other suit able material having similar properties. Formed on one end of the fitment 12, there is a hollow neck engageable end 12a which is suitably shaped to slip snugly over the neck 10, and be retained thereon by an interior recess 12d defined within said neck engageable end 12a, which is engageable wtih the retaining lip 10!) in a snap-fit relationship. The opposite end of the fitment 12, or outer end 12b, terminates in an inwardly projecting annular retaining lip 12e which defines a central orifice 12g communicating with the interior of the fitment 12. Interspaced between the ends 12a and 1212, there is an annular perforate partition 12] which projects into the interior of the fitment 12, and cooperates with the retaining lip 12e to define a ball socket 12c therebetween. As illlustrated in Fig. 3, the partition 121 has a centrally defined opening 12 and a group of spaced marginal ducts 12k extending obliquely therethrough. Although, four such ducts 12k are illustrated in Fig. 3, it is quite obvious that one such duct 12]: may be sufficient depending, in some measure, upon the viscosity of the liquid to be applied.

The upper surface 121 of the partition 12 is inclined radially toward the central axis of the fitment 12 and serves as a seat for the ball 11. It is also obvious that the configuration of the partition 12 may be altered considerably without departing materially from the intendment of this invention, and one such modification is represented in Fig. 4, wherein the annular unit construction shown in Fig. 3, is replaced by a group of spaced lugs 12h projecting radially into the interior of the fitment 12.

The ball 11, which functions as the applicator, is diametrically larger than the orifice 12g and may be deformed sufficiently by merely compressing the ball 11 to permit insertion thereof through the orifice 12g and into the ball socket 120. After the ball 11 has been thus introduced into the ball socket 12c the compressive force may be released; whereupon, the ball 11 will resiliently return to its normal spherical shape and be retained in socketed relationship with the ball socket 120. The ball socket 12c is so located with respect to the outer end 12b of the fitment 12 that a minor portion 11a of the ball 11 will protrude therefrom and define an applicator surface. However, the remainder of the ball 11, or the major portion 11b, will be nestably retained within the ball socket for free rotatable movement.

In this assembled position, the ball 11 is ready for applying the liquid contents of the container by merely inverting the container and rolling the minor portion 11a of the ball 11 in contact with the surface to be coated. When the. container is thus inverted the ball 11 wil1 aeeaeeo gravitationally shift into contact with the retaining lip He and prevent passage of the liquid through the orifice 12g until the minor portion 11a is brought into contact with the surface to be coated. After such contact however, a slight pressure exerted upon the minor portion 11a as its being rolled will be sufficient to lift the ball 11 out of contact with the retaining lip 12a, and permit the liquid flowing through the ducts 12k to be transferred from the surface of the ball 11 onto the surface to be coated in a smooth and uniform manner. Although, the ball 11 has a deformable construction, the slight pressure necessary to shift the ball 11 away from the orifice during the application of the liquid contents will not be sufiicient to deform the ball 11, to such an extent, as to interfere wtih the free and even application of the liquid. However, a substantially increased pressure upon the ball 11 will cause it to distort and restrict the amount of liquid transferred. Thus, even if excessive pressure should be applied to the ball 11, no objectionable excessive quantities of liquid will be dispensed. This feature is quite advantageous when and if the applicator falls into the hands of children unfamiliar with its usage.

A closure 13 having a generally conventional configuration is also provided for isolating the assembled ball 11 and fitment 12, as well as the liquid contents of the container, from the atmosphere during periods of nonuse. This closure 13 may be molded from glass, plastic, or other suitable material, and is internally threaded with conventional "threads 13a which are threadably engageable with the threads d externally formed on the container neck 10. As illustrated in Fig. 1, the closed end portion 13b, of the closure 13, is spaced the requisite distance from the threads 13a to permit the closed end 13b to depress the ball 11 as the closure 13 is threadably engaged with the neck 10. When the applicator surface, or minor portion 11a, is depressed in this manner the ball 11 will be compressed between the closure 13 and the partition 12 and distend laterally into peripheral sealing contact with an annular sealing area 12m of the fitment 12. As illustrated in Fig. 2, the resilient nature of the ball 11 will cause it to rapidly resume its normal spherical shape as the closure 13 is removed from the container, and thereby permit immediate use of the applicator upon complete removal of the closure 13.

It is to be noted, when the closure 13 deforms the ball 11 into sealing contact with the fitment 12 a double seal is provided, namely; an inner peripheral seal between the ball 11 and the fitment 12, and an outer seal between the threadably engaged portions of the closure 13 and the container neck 10. This double seal is particularly advantageous when the applicator is used for dispensing such liquids as perfumes and colognes, which in addition to having properties which cause them to evaporate readily, in many instances, are quite expensive. However, the aforedescribed applicator is not limited to use with such materials and is readily adaptable to the more viscid type of liquids and emulsions such as hand 10- tions, deodorant creams, cosmetic creams, and other similar preparations. In fact, the wide variety of liquids with which this improved applicator assembly may be utilized constitutes one of its distinct advantages.

A particular advantage of the present invention resides in the character of the novel ball applicator, which may be formed from resilient materials, such as rubber or plastic, having properties rendering the surface of the ball applicator non-abrasive to the skin of the human body without the necessity of finishing the applicator surface with an expensive ground and polished finish.

Another object of the present invention resides in the deformable character of the ball 11 which renders it readily adaptable to a ball structure having a hollow interior, thereby presenting a light weight ball applicator accompanied by a considerable saving in material cost.

Another advantage of this invention resides in the simple design of the ball 11, fitment 12 and the closure 13, which permits these parts to be rapidly molded by conventional methods well known to those skilled in the art.

Another distinct advantage of the present invention resides in the overall structure of this invention which permits the component parts to be fabricated from materials such as plastic, or rubber which are generally more resistant to chemical attack than most metals of comparable cost, while still providing a substantially rigid and durable assemblage of the component parts.

It will, of course, be understood that various details of construction may be modified through a wide range without departing from the principles of this invention, and it is, therefore, not the purpose to limit the patent granted hereon otherwise than necessitated by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A dispensing package comprising; a container having a neck defining a dispensing opening, said neck having an externally threaded portion and a peripheral fastening rim axially outward from and of less diameter than said threaded portion; an annular ball fitment having a neck engageable end, an outer end axially opposite said neck engageable end, and an interiorly situated perforate partition interspaced between said ends, said neck engageable end being cooperably engaged with said fastening rim to maintain said neck and said fitment in secured relation ship, said outer end having an inwardly projecting annular retaining lip defining an orifice, said partition and said lip cooperating to define a ball socket communicating with said orifice and said neck engageable end; a ball diametrically larger than said orifice and shiftably nesting within said socket, said ball being resiliently deformable to permit passage of said ball through said orifice, a major portion of said ball being within said socket and a minor portion of said ball protruding out wardly from said orifice to define an applicator surface; a closure threadably engageable with said threaded neck portion, and means on said closure for deforming said ball into peripheral sealing contact with said fitment.

2. A dispensing package comprising; a container having a neck defining a dispensing opening, said neck having an externally threaded portion and a peripheral fastening rim axially outward from and of less diameter than said threaded portion; an annular ball fitment having a neck engageable end, an outer end axially opposite said neck engageable end, and an interiorly situated perforate partition interspaced between said ends, said neck engageable end being cooperably engaged with said fastening rim to maintain said neck and said fitment in secured relationship, said outer end having an inwardly projecting annular retaining lip defining an orifice, said partition and said lip cooperating to define a ball socket communicating with said orifice and said neck engageable end, said ball socket including an annular sealing surface normally spaced from said ball; a ball diametrically larger than said orifice and shiftably nesting within said socket, said ball being resiliently deformable to permit passage of said ball through said orifice, a major portion of said ball being within said socket and a minor portion of said ball protruding outwardly from said orifice to define an applicator surface; a closure threadably engageable with said threaded neck portion, and means on said closure for distorting said ball into peripheral sealing engagement with said sealing surface.

3. A dispensing package comprising; a container having a neck defining a dispensing opening, said neck having thereon external fastening means and an annular ball fitment of lesser diameter than said external fastening means, said fitment defining an interior ball socket communicating with said dispensing opening; a resiliently deformable ball having a major portion loosely nesting within said socket and a minor portion protruding outwardly from said fitment to define an applicator surface;

a closure having fastening means cooperably engageable with said external fastening means on said neck portion; and means on said closure for deforming said ball laterally into peripheral sealing contact with said fitment.

4. A liquid dispensing package comprising; a. container having a neck defining a dispensing opening, said neck having thereon an annular ball fitment defining an internal ball socket communicating with said dispensing opening, said ball socket having defined therein an annular sealing surface; a resiliently deformable ball confined within said ball socket and freely rotatable therein; a perforate partition situated Within said fitment supporting said ball in spaced relationship with said sealing surface, and with a portion of the ball protruding from said fitment to function as an applicating surface, said partition being provided with at least one fluid passage by-passing said ball and communicating with said opening and said socket, said ball being adapted to rotatably transfer an adhering layer of the liquid contents of said container onto a selected surface when moderate applicating pressure is applied to said applicating surface, and to resiliently distend to sealingly engage said sealing surface when excessive pressure is applied to said applicating surface.

5. A dispensing packinge comprising; a container having a neck defining a dispensing opening, said neck having thereon external fastening means and an annular ball fitment of lesser diameter than said external fastening means, said fitment defining an interior ball socket communicating with said dispensing opening and further defining an annular sealing surface surrounding a segment of said ball socket; a resiliently deformable ball having a major portion loosely nesting within said socket and a minor portion protruding outwardly from said fitment to define an applicator surface; a closure having fastening means cooperably engageable with said external fastening means on said neck portion; and means on said closure for deforming said ball laterally into peripheral sealing contact with said sealing surface.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 586,038 Hope July 6, 1897 664,155 Houtman Dec. 18, 1900 1,977,414 Testa Oct. 16, 1934 2,390,636 Biro Dec. 11, 1945 2,571,010 Busch Oct. 1, 1951 2,700,784 De Brock Feb. 1, 1955 2,749,566 Thomas June 12, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 405,901 Great Britain Feb. 15, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US586038 *Oct 15, 1896Jul 6, 1897 Bottle and stopper
US664155 *Mar 8, 1900Dec 18, 1900Tjark J HoutmanMoistening device.
US1977414 *Apr 18, 1934Oct 16, 1934Anthony TestaPerfume dispenser
US2390636 *Jun 17, 1943Dec 11, 1945Jozsef Biro LaszloWriting instrument
US2571010 *Oct 10, 1946Oct 9, 1951Owens Illinois Glass CoNursing bottle
US2700784 *Sep 2, 1952Feb 1, 1955Owens Illinois Glass CoBall type liquid applicator and closure for same
US2749566 *Sep 4, 1952Jun 12, 1956Bristol Myers CoDispenser
GB405901A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3010139 *Dec 1, 1958Nov 28, 1961Parker Raymond HMarking devices
US3055041 *Jan 4, 1961Sep 25, 1962Owens Illinois Glass CoBall applicator assembly with shuttletype closure
US4571106 *Jan 9, 1984Feb 18, 1986Richard ScuderiSun lotion applicator
US5116156 *Jul 27, 1990May 26, 1992Landi Joseph VRoller-type material applicator
US5553957 *Nov 7, 1995Sep 10, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyProduct dispenser with enlarged non-dispensing application/distribution surface
US20090157153 *Dec 13, 2007Jun 18, 2009Sarah Anne LemkeSkin cooling system
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/213, 401/215, 215/360
International ClassificationA45D34/04
Cooperative ClassificationA45D34/041
European ClassificationA45D34/04B