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Publication numberUS2883980 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 28, 1959
Filing dateMar 1, 1957
Priority dateMar 1, 1957
Publication numberUS 2883980 A, US 2883980A, US-A-2883980, US2883980 A, US2883980A
InventorsStorz Jr Charles R
Original AssigneeStorz Instr Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Physician's headlight
US 2883980 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 28, 1959 c. R. STORZ, JR

PHYSICIANS HEADLIGHT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 1, 1957 oodooobooo 00 1 April 28, 1959 c. R. STORZ, JR 2,833,980

PHYSICIAN'S HEADLIGHT Filed March 1, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. 36 g. U4M m$ United States Patent PHYSICIANS HEADLIGHT Charles R. Storz, Jr., St. Louis, Mo., assignor to Storz Instrument Company, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Application March 1, 1957, Serial No. 643,457

16 Claims. (Cl. 12823) This application is a continuation in part of an earlier application filed May 26, 1955, Serial No. 511,224.

The invention relates to headlights such as are used by physicians, surgeons, or dentists, and the invention consists in a band, applicable to the head of the user, and a lamp mounting carried by the band for firmly holding an electric lamp in various positions relative to the users head. Among the objects of the invention is to make it possible for the surgeon to readily adjust the band and apply it to his head and to adjust the lamp from one position to another position, all without necessitating the manipulation of screws, clamps, etc. with the fingers and thereby impair the sterile condition of the users gloved fingers during an operation.

It is an object to be able to move the lamp toward and from the users head as Well as to adjust its height and the angularity of the reflected beam of light.

In one form of the invention, the reflector forming a part of the headlight may be shifted angularly both horizontally and vertically. In another form of the invention, the reflector may be tilted up and down relative to the headband, but may not be directed to ditferent angular positions horizontally relative to the headband.

Another object is to insure a firm positioning of the lamp in adjusted position without necessitating the loosening and tightening of clamps each time the lamp is adjusted.

Another object is to facilitate circulation of air between the lamp mounting and the users head.

Another object is to facilitate the removal and replacement of the reflecting mirror and the lamp for different types of beam, or for replacement if broken, without returning the entire assembly to the factory.

These and other detailed objects as will appear from the following description are attained by the structure illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure .1 is a top view of the device with the lamp and its mounting shown in one position in full lines and in another position in broken lines and being sectioned in part on the line 1-1 of Figure 2.

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the structure shown in Figure 1 being sectioned in part on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a detailed section taken on the line 33 of Figure l and drawn to an enlarged scale.

Figure 4 is a detailed section taken on the line 44 of Figure l and drawn to an enlarged scale.

Figure 5 is a view of the rear portion of the headband taken approximately on the line 5-5 of Figure 2 and drawn to an enlarged scale.

Figure 6 is a top view of the forward portion of a headband attached linkage and a reflector and lamp mounting member, another form of the invention in which all the links are movable in a substantially vertical direction only and the mirror may not be inclined horizontally relative to the headband.

Figure 7 is a side elevation of the structure shown in Patented Apr. 28, 1959 Figure 6 and shows the lamp in different adjusted positions.

Figure 8 is a view of the back of the mirror mounting shown in Figures 6 and 7.

Figure 9 is a view of the front of the mirror mounting. Figures 8 and 9 are drawn to an enlarged scale and illustrate elements normally holding the mirror in solid lines and the same elements in mirror releasing position in broken lines.

The device is mounted upon the users head by means of a resilient, form-retaining band 1 of plastic or like material fitted with a head-contacting band 2 of flexible textile material readily applicable to and removable from band 1 and mounted on the latter by hooks 3 and clips 4 and 5 so as to provide areas A between plastic band 1 and fabric band 2. Hooks 3 are selectively applied to any one of a series of perforations 6 at the rear portion of band 1. The flexible band 2 is stitched to form upright pockets for clips 4, which are slidable along plastic band 1. Clips 5 project rearwardly from a base plate 7 firmly secured to band 1. A gap between the ends of vertically aligned clips 5 permits the flexible band portion 2a to be hooked and unhooked readily.

Band 1 is an elongated strip bent into a circular form with its ends overlapping, as indicated in the section portion of Figure 1. A slide 8 includes ends 8a riveted to band end 1a and forming with the remaining portion of the band a slide receiving the band end 111. Secured to the extreme end of band end 1b is a latch piece 9 forming with the band a chamber slidably receiving the adjacent band end 1a. Spring catches 18 on latch piece 9 seat in apertures 11 in band end 1a and securely hold the band in adjusted position. The spring catches are so shaped that the ends may be moved to reduce the diameter of the band by relatively light pressure against opposite sides of the band applied in the direction of the arrows X. Accordingly, after the band has been applied to the head of the user by an attendant, the user may hold a sterile towel in his two hands and press against the opposite sides of band 1 so as to slide the overlapping ends over each other to adjust the tension exerted by band 1 on fabric band 2 and comfortably but firmly seat the band on the users head.

Extending forwardly from base plate 7 are three rigid brackets 12 and 13, here shown as being struck out from the metal of the base plate. Brackets 12 are disposed vertically. Bracket 13 is disposed horizontally. Relatively short links 14 are riveted -to brackets 12 by horizontal rivets 15, the rivets being sufliciently loose to permit the links to swivel thereon when manual pressure is applied to the links or to the parts carried thereby, but sufficiently tight to resist swiveling by the normal thrust exerted by the weight of the lamp and reflector.

Relatively longer links 16 and 17 extend forwardly successively from links 14 and are connected to the latter and to each other by vertical rivets 18 which frictionally grip the interconnected parts similarly to rivets 1S and accommodate relative movement of links 16, 17 from the full line position shown in Figure 1 to the broken line position.

Similarly a short link 24 is secured to bracket 13 by vertical rivet 25. successively longer links 26 and 27 are secured to the outer end of link 24 and to each other respectively by horizontal rivets 28 and extend forwardly from the band and may shift from the full line position shown in Figure 2 to the broken line position.

Relatively short links 29 and 30 extend forwardly from the outer ends of links 17 and 27, respectively, being frictionally assembled therewith by rivets 31 and 32, respectively, corresponding in the disposition of their axes to rivets 18 and 28 respectively.

Short. links 29 and 30 are connected at their outer ends by rivets 33, 34 to brackets 35, 36 projecting from a parabolic mirror back member 37 having two clips 38 for seating the lower portion of the mirror 39.

A bracket 40 projects from the upper portion of back 37 and terminates in an arcuate rack segment 41. A clevis arm 42 is pivoted at 43 to rack segment 41 and journals the shaft 44 of a worm 45 having a thumb wheel 46 by which the worm may be rotated to feed clevis 42 around the axis of rack 41 to cause the clevis to assume difierent angles relative to mirror back 37. Clevis arm 42 mounts rigid conduits 47, the lower ends of which mount socket 48 for a lamp 49 supplied with current by an electric cord 50 passing through conduits 47 to socket 48 and leading from a plug 51 which will be inserted in a suitable source of supply, usually a transformer connected to a house light circuit. Depending from clevis arm 42 is a stifi spring finger 52 terminating in a coil 53 adapted to bear against the upper portion of mirror 39 and hold it to its seat 38 on back 37. When the parts are in the position shown in Figure 2, thumb screw 46 may be rotated to move the lamp bulb toward and from the mirror to provide diverging, parallel, or converging rays of light. Thumb screw 46 may be rotated further to shift clevis arm 42 from the full line position shown in Figures 2 and 3 to the broken line position shown in Figure 2, which will move spring finger 52 away from the mirror far enough to permit its ready dislodgment from seats 38 for cleaning or replacement and it is unnecessary to return the assembly to a factory for replacement of the mirror and obviously it is unnecessary to provide a second device for use while the first one is being repaired.

With the construction described, the mirror is readily tilted into and out of either functioning position shown and angularly adjusted horizontally, or moved forwardly or rearwardly from base plate 7 to direct the reflected light rays as may be desired. The angular adjustment of the mirror may be effected in any position irrespective of the distance between the mirror and base plate 7. The mirror and mirror back are shown with wide slots S which accommodate vision by the operator through the slots when the mirror is in the position shown in full lines in Figure 2. The numerous frictional joints assure the retention of the mirror in any selected position solely by the frictional engagement of the riveted parts. Because of the numerous joints, it is unnecessary for the friction of any joint to approach the friction of a single ball and socket joint mounting as has been done previously. Such a mounting usually requires a large bearing and a screw adjustment which must be loosened when the mirror is to be shifted and subsequently tightened to hold the mirror in adjusted position. If the lamp and mirror are to be positioned above the line of sight, as indicated in broken lines in Figure 2, the slots are unnecessary. If desired, the slotted mirror may be removed and an unslotted mirror inserted. This is done readily by turning screw 46 to move finger 52 away from the mirror, whereupon it is readily unseated and removed and an unslotted mirror substituted. The present structure provides an angular and a lazy tong connection between the headband and mirror back and possessing sufficient frictional resistance to shifting to maintain the lamp in one position while yielding to manual pressure to readily adjust the lamp to a different position.

The structure shown in Figures 69 shows a headband 60 to which a bracket base plate 61 is readily applied and removed. Three links 62, 63, 64 have pivots on plate 61 and extend generally forward from the headband. Links 65, 66, 67 each have one end pivotally connected to links 62, 63, 64 respectively and have their outer end pivoted to a mirror mounting or backing 68. All of the link pivots are disposed horizontally so that the links move only vertically and in parallel planes. Since the link pivots to the bracket base plate are spaced apart vertically and transversely, there is provided a stable positioning of the mounting irrespective of the height or angle to which it is moved.

The lamp 70 and its support and adjustment device, indicated generally at 71, correspond to that previously described. Mirror 75 is the same as previously described, but it is retained on mounting 68 by a pair of clips 79, fixed on mounting 68 at one side of the axis of mirror 75, and by a pair of jaws 78 at the other side of the mirror axis and formed on the outer ends of spring arms 76 having a common frictional pivot 77 on mounting 68 so that the arms may swing between the positions indicated in Figures 8 and 9. The arms are readily movable to the broken line position and release the upper edge of the mirror, which then may be readily slipped upwardly and out of engagement with clips 79 at the lower edge of the mirror.

Arms 76 take the place of spring finger 52, best shown in Figure 3, and constitute the mirror mounting and retaining elements in a single unit independently of the attachment for the lamp as shown in Figures 1-3.

The reflector may not be adjusted in as many directions as that previously shown, and this may be considered ad vantageous by some users.

The details of the device may be varied substantially without departing from the spirit of the invention and the exclusive use of those modifications coming within the scope of the claims is contemplated.

What is claimed is:

1. A physicians headlight comprising an elongated strip of normally form-sustaining, but resilient, material having a generally circular shape, with overlapping end portions slidably secured to each other to adjust the effective circumference of the strip, a fabric strap secured at its ends to said strip near the overlapping portions of the latter and extending chordally of said strip throughout a portion of its length at a point spaced from the overlapping ends, and a lamp mounted on the outer face of said strip intermediate its overlapping end portions.

2. A physicians headlight comprising an elongated strip of normally form-sustaining, but resilient, material with overlapping ends slidably assembled, there being readily releasable catch means automatically holding said ends in selected overlapping relation as they are moved to contract the strip, a flexible fabric band of less length than said strip and having its ends anchored to said strip near the overlapping portions of the latter, clips on said strip at intervals, said band extending from its ends chordally of the strip to said clips and adapted to engage the head of the user to frictionally hold the band in place with the forward portion of the strip spaced from the users head, and a lamp mounted on the exterior of the forward portion of said strip.

3. A physicians headlight comprising a band for surrounding and frictionally gripping the head of the user, a plurality of links pivoted to said band to swing sub stantially at right angles to each other, other links pivoted to the swinging ends of said first-mentioned links to swing in transverse directions respectively to the swinging movement of the associated first-mentioned links, a mirror supported from the outer ends of said second-mentioned links, the link pivots forming a plurality of mirror-supporting frictional joints between said band and mirror.

4. In a physicians headlight, a band adapted to surround and to be frictionally supported upon the head of the user, a mirror back, interpivoted linkage mount-' ing said back upon said band, the link pivots forming frictional joints yieldably maintaining the links in adjusted back-supporting position, an arm pivoted on said.

them toward and from the mirror and back as it is r0- tated in opposite positions.

6. A physicians headlight comprising a headband for application to the users head, a mirror mounting member provided with a lamp, and a lazy-tong extending between and having connections to said headband and mirror mounting member, each connection comprising a pair of pivots with vertically and horizontally disposed axes respectively, and accommodating movement of the mirror and headband to and from each other in vertical and horizontal directions and angularly of each other.

7. In a physicians headlight, a headband, a series of at least four interpivoted links arranged end to end with one end of the series having a vertical axis pivot connection to said band, a mirror back having a vertical axis pivot connection to the other end of said series, the links of the series having horizontal axis pivotal connections to each other, another series of at least four interpivoted links arranged end to end with one end link of the series having a horizontal axis pivot connection to the band and the other end of the series having a horizontal axis pivot connection to said back, all of the links of the second-mentioned series having vertical axis pivotal connections to each other, said pivotal connections of both series being of a frictional nature to maintain the links in a selected pivoted position but yielding to manual pressure for ready adjustment of the back and mirror relative to each other by angularly shifting the links on their pivots.

8. A physicians headlight according to claim 7 in which one of the series of interpivoted links is duplicated between the headband and the mirror back.

9. In a physicians headlight, a mirror back, a bracket projecting therefrom and terminating in an arcuate toothed segment, an arm pivoted to the bracket at the center of the toothed segment arc, a worm journaled in said arm and meshing with the segment teeth, a finger projecting from said arm downwardly and toward the mirror back and movable forwardly from and rear- Wardly toward the mirror back by rotation of said worm in opposite directions, and a mirror seated against said back and held :to its seat by said finger when the latter is moved rearwardly but readily removable from the back when the finger is moved away from said back.

10. In a physicians headlight, a mirror mounting, a bracket projecting therefrom and terminating in an arcuate toothed segment, an arm pivoted to the bracket at the center of the toothed segment arc, a worm journaled in said arm and meshing with the segment teeth, a member projecting from said am forwardly of the mirror and provided with a lamp base on its outer end, said base being movable forwardly from and rearwardly toward the mirror mounting by rotation of said worm in opposite directions to control the beam of light reflected from a lamp in said base by a mirror on said mounting.

11. In a physicians headlight, a band adapted to surround and to "be frictionally supported upon the head of the user, a mirror back, interpivoted linkage mounting said back upon said band, the link pivots forming frictional joints yieldably maintaining the links in adjusted back-supporting position, an arm pivoted on said back and extending forwardly thereof and mounting a lamp in front of said back, a mirror seated against said back, and means releasably holding said mirror on said back.

12. A physicians headlight comprising a headband for application to the users head, a mirror mounting member provided with a lamp, and a plurality of lazy-tong linkages extending between and having pivotal connections to said headband and mirror mounting member, the links of different linkages folding in at least two planes substantially at right angles to each other and the terminals of the linkages being spaced apart transversely of a line between the headband and mirror mounting member whereby the mirror mounting member may be adjusted laterally, vertically and angularly relative to the headband, the pivotal connections of the links to each other and to the headband and mirror mounting member having suflicient friction to maintain a selected adjustment against the weight of the apparatus.

13. In a physicians headlight, a band adapted to surround and to be frictionally supported on the head of the user, a plurality of links pivoted to said band to swing in substantially parallel vertical planes, additional links each pivoted at one end to the outer end of one of said first-mentioned links to swing in a corresponding vertical plane, a mirror mounting supported on the outer end of the second mentioned links by pivots providing for relative vertical movement of the mounting and links in a vertical direction, the joints of said pivots affording frictional resistance to relative movement of the interpivoted parts to support the mirror mounting in adjusted position.

14. A physicians headlight according to claim 11 in which the axes of all of the frictional joints are disposed substantially horizontally so that the mirror may be readily adjusted to difierent vertical positions relative to the band and to different angular positions about a horizontal axis, but is held against movement relative to the band in a horizontal direction.

15. A physicians headlight comprising a concave spherical-segment mirror of glass or the like and a concave spherical-segment mounting of metal or the like, having spaced lugs at one side of the mirror-mounting axis projecting from the concave side of the mounting for engaging the edge of the mirror, there being an arm pivoted at one end to the mounting at the opposite side of said axis to swing in a plane transversely of said axis and having an inwardly facing jaw at its outer end to swing with the arm toward and away from the edge of the mounting to receive the edge of the mirror and mounting and hold them assembled.

16. A physicians headlight comprising a concave spherical-segment mirror of glass or the like and a concave spherical-segment mounting of metal or the like, having spaced lugs at one side of the mirror mounting axis projecting from the concave side of the mounting for engaging the edge of the mirror, there being a pair of arms having adjacent ends pivoted to the mounting at the opposite side of said axis and extending divergently from their pivot outwardly beyond the periphery of the mounting and terminating in inwardly facing jaws movable about the pivot toward and away from the periphery of the mounting and adapted'to receive the edge of the mirror and mounting and hold them assembled.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 745,374 Ordway Dec. 1, 1903 2,371,712 Scholl et a]. Mar. 20, 1945 2,651,301 Allyn et al. Sept. 8, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 17,950/34 Australia July 9, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US745374 *Apr 9, 1903Dec 1, 1903Benjamin F OrdwayBracket for mirrors or electric lamps.
US2371712 *Mar 6, 1942Mar 20, 1945Scholl Mfg Co IncHelmet construction
US2651301 *Nov 1, 1951Sep 8, 1953Welch Allyn IncHeadlamp for physicians and surgeons
AU1795034A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4516190 *Dec 29, 1983May 7, 1985Luxtec CorporationFor use between the eyes
DE3535019A1 *Oct 1, 1985Apr 2, 1987Riester Kg RudolfHeadband with mounting for medical diagnostic instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/248, 362/105
International ClassificationA61B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B3/0008
European ClassificationA61B3/00B