Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2886020 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1959
Filing dateOct 14, 1955
Priority dateOct 14, 1955
Publication numberUS 2886020 A, US 2886020A, US-A-2886020, US2886020 A, US2886020A
InventorsFred C Wolfe
Original AssigneeFred C Wolfe
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor idler jet control means
US 2886020 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1959 F. c. WOLFE 2,836,020 i v CARBURETOR IDLER JET CONTROL MEANS -1 Filed t. 14 1955 v 3 Sheets-Sheet l Z5 1 95 5 37 38 27 J J7 15 .24 INVENTOR.

May 12, 1959 F. c. WOLFE 2,386,020

CARBURETOR IDLER JET CONTROL MEANS Filed Oct. 14, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2.

IN V EN TOR.

May 12, 1959 F. c. WOLFE ,3

CARBURETOR IDLER JET CONTROL MEANS Filed Oct. 14, 1955 5 Sheets-sheaf. a

IN V EN TOR..

* United q States PatfitO 2,886,020 cAnn Rn'ro rn ER rm" CONTROL MEANS Fred C. Wolfe, Burbank, Calif.

Application October 14, 1955, Serial No. 540,372

19 Claims. (21. 123-124 This invention relates to carburetion control devices and more particularly to an improved and novel form thereof elfective to reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engines of automotive vehicles during the deceleration cycle with resultant elimination of the discharge of unburned fuel and consequent reduction of smog producing pollutants to the atmosphere and at the same time, realising the attendant saving of fuel.

It is now well settled, that the chief pollutants of th atmosphere which produce the conditiontknown as smog are the vaporized constituents of unburned gasoline which is discharged into the atmosphere. It is, equally well settled that except for improperly adjusted carburetors, the chief source of these pollutants derives from motor vehicles when they are coasting atspeeds above, say, fifteen miles per h'ourwith the throttle closed. These situations prevail at at least two principal times, viz., when With the foregoing objects in view, together with such additional object and advantages as may subsequently appear, the invention resides in the parts and in the construction, combination and arrangement of parts, described, by way of example, in the following specification of certain presently preferred modes of execution of the. invention; reference being had to the accompanying drawings which form a part of said specification and in which drawings:

Fig. l is a side elevation of a portion of the engine of a motor vehicle showing one embodiment of the invention applied thereto comprising a switch means operated by the throttle means and a second switch operated by a vane disposed in the cooling fan air stream and additionally showing in broken lines a modification. of that em bodiment,

a Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the vane shown in Fig. 1, Fig. 3 is an exploded view of the component parts of the idler jet control valve means employed in the present invention as a replacement for the idler jet needle valve screw, 0

mounted on a carburetor as a replacement for each of 1 the idler jet adjusting screwstogether with switch means responsive to throttle position and engine speed effective to cause the said electrically operated valve means to close the idler jets under conditions of a closed, or nearly closed throttleand an engine speed somewhat above the normal idling speed. a, j t t 0 Another object of the invention isto provide a solenoid operated valve construction which can serve "as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting needle valve.

A further object of the invention is to provide an operatingcontrol :for a solenoid operated idler jet valve including means actuated by the air pressure derived from the engine cooling fan of a motor vehicle.

Still another object of the invention isto provide an operating control for a solenoid operated idler jet control valve including an engine speed responsive device and throttle operated means for rendering said speed responsive device effective to operate .a switch for energizing and de-energizing said solenoid operated idler jet control valve. i

a A still further object of the invention is to provide a soi Fig. 4 is an enlarged medial sectional view of a manifold attached end of a carburetor and idler jet and showing also in medial section the solenoid operated valve for the idler jet applied thereto,

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevation of the engine of another motor vehicle in which the vane control means can not be conveniently applied and in which the idler jet control valve. is operated by a single switch through the combined action of a centrifugal force responsive means rotating with the engine and other means attached to the throttle, u t

2 Fig. 6 is an enlarged scale fragmentary elevation of the throttle carrying portion of the carburetor as viewed from the right hand side of Fig. 5 a

Fig. 7 is an enlarged side elevation of the centrifugal force responsive device and the parts of the control cooperating therewith,

Fig. 8 is an embodiment of the invention employing the centrifugal force device but with the modification thereof by the throttle eliminated,

Fig. 9 shows an embodiment of the form of the invention shownin Fig. '1 but with the throttle controlled switch replaced by means forrendering the vane operated switch operative or inoperative at will,

Fig. 10 is a circuit diagram of the form of the invention shown in Fig. 1 and showing a modification thereof in broken lines, and i Figs. 11, 12 and 13 are circuit diagrams showing the circuits of the embodiments of the invention disclosed inFigs. 5, 8 and 9, respectively. I a

Referring first to Figs 3 and 4 of the drawings, there is shown in detail the solenoid operated valve means of the invention, which valve means replaces the needle point screw commonly used to effect adjustment of the carburetor idler jet or jets. It will be understood that in each installation of a device embodying the invention there will be one of these solenoid operated valve devices for each idler jet in thecarburetor and thatwhere a plurality of idler jets is involved such solenoids may be connected either in series or in series parallel relation as best suits the convenience. of the installer. The solenoid operated valve means 1 comprises a tubular valve guide member 2 which is provided with external threads 3 at one end thereof for engagement with the threads T in the body of a carburetor C in whichthe adjusting screw for the idler jet I is received; the threads 3 beingof sufiicient length to permit adjustment of the device in the threads T incident to providing the proper operating clearance for the valve element. presently to be described. At its "other end the valve guide member is provided with a thin annular head portion 4 which is engagedbydne-end oftlie' solenoid coil housing sleeve saidend being" spun" inwardly over the head 4 as best shown in Fig. 3. The sleeve 5 contains and houses a solenoid coil 6 comprising a winding 7 carried by a spool Sfand exteriorly'surrounded by a covering sleeve 9; said spool and covering sleeve beingformed of suitable nonconductive material. The other end of the sleeve 5 is spun over a cover element 10' which secures the coil againstendwise movement and" which has an axially disposed clearance recess forming portion 11 for the end of theflreciprocable armature 12. The armature 12 at the end thereof extending toward the valve guide 2 carries a valve member comprising a rod 13 slidable in and extending beyond the threaded end of the'valve guide 2 and terminating in a needle point 14 adapted to engage the idler jet valve seat 5. The valve guide member 2 beyond the li'ead'portion 4 includes an axially disposed b'os's 15'which extends into the interior of the spool 8 and serves as an" abutment limiting travel of the armature 12 in a direction to cause the valve member to close theidler jet. The adjacent end of the armature 12 is'provided with an annular groove 16 and a light compression spring 17 surrounding the rod 13 and reacting between the end of the boss 15 and the'bottom of the groove 16 tends constantly to move the armature and valve member to the left as viewed in Fig. 3 with resultant opening of the idler jet. The device is screwed into the' carburetor body as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting screw and is secured in place by use of the compression spring 18 which is removed from the adjusting screw and a sleeve 19 loosely fitting over the valve guide member 2 and which provides an abutment for the spring at the point at which it was engaged by the head of' the replaced adjusting screw. The device is screwed into the carburetor body until the valve member, when withdrawn by the spring 17, effects the desired restriction of the. jet orifice and the force exerted by the spring 18 serves thereafter to maintain it in adjusted position. Also as shown in Fig. 3 the cover element 10 in the rim thereof is provided with a notch 20 through which the leads 21 and 22 of the coil 7' extend for connection to the controlling switch means. As before stated, this valve means is actuated'to close the idler jets under certain conditions of vehicle operation and the closure is effected against the force exerted by the spring 17 by energization of the coil 7.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 there is shown an embodiment of the invention in which both a spring biased vane 23and a switch 24 operated thereby and a second switch 25 operated by the throttle comprising the control for the solenoid operated valve are employed. In this embodiment of the invention, the vane 23 is located directly in'rear of the cooling fan F and is supported by one end of an arm 26 the other end of which is pivotally mounted on a pin 27 carried by a' bracket arm 28 for movement toward and away from the fan. The bracket arm 28 comprises an extension one of a pair of arms 29 and 30 rising from a horizontal member 31 which is carried by a bracket and clamp 32 attached to the generator G of the vehicle. Slidingly mounted in the arms 29 and 30 is a rod 33 which projects at one end'beyond the arm 29 and is connected to the vane carrying arm 26. The opposite end of the rod 33 projects beyond the arm 30 and is disposed in the axial line of an operating plunger 34 of the normally open, snap action switch 24 carried by a bracket arm 35 extending laterally from the rear face of the rod supporting arm 30. A compress'ion spring 36 surrounds the rod 33 between the arms 29 and 30 and reacts between the forward face of the arm 30 and a washer 37 secured on the rod 33 by a cotter pin 38 tending to move the rod 33 to the right as viewed in Fig. 1 to the extent permitted by the stop comprising the cotter pin 39 extending through the rod 33 between the cotter pin 38 and the rear face of' the arm 29 and allowing the vane to occupy the position shown in full switches.

lines in Fig. 1 unless moved against the bias of the spring 36 by the airstream generated by thefan F. One'of the mounting bolts for the carburetor C additionally secures a laterally and thence downwardly extending bracket 40 in the free end of which the normally open switch 25 is mounted; said switch comprising an externally threaded shank 41 extending through the bracket and being secured therein" by; lock nuts 42 at each side of the bracket affording. means for adjustment of the switch in the bracket; The switch is disposed in the line of the throttle rod endwhich is attached to the operating arm for the carburetor throttle valve V and includes a" spring biased plunger 43' extending from" the shank 41 which upon being-coutactedyas the throttle valve reaches closed position is depressed into the shank with resultant closing of the contact means within the switch body. This switch is one obtainable on the open market and further description is not deemed necessary. A lead 44 extends from a source of electrical energyto one side of the switch 24, a second lead. 45co'nnects the opposite side of the switch 24 with one side of the solenoid valve 1, a third lead. 46 extends from the sol'er noid to the switch 25, and a fourth lead 47 extends' from the opposite side of the switch 25" to the" ground; In practice one side of the switch is grounded, but 21 sep? arate ground is shown'for clearn'ess of-"illustration'; It isnot essential that the leads be thus arranged, the only requirement being that thetwo switches and the solenoid be connected in series relation. Also, if more than one: solenoid is employed they'can be connected in series'with each other and with the switches or in parallel as a group with the group beiug'connected in series with the The circuit of the above-described embodiment is shown in'Fig. 10 in which the throttle control and foot pedal are designated P.

Referring first to Fig. 1, the device'is shownunder operating conditions in which the engineis idling. The,

throttle is closed closing the switch 25, but the air-stream,- from the engine fan is insuflicient to displace the vane 23 from the position imposed by the spring 36 and con sequently, the switch 24 is open and the solenoid valve is not energized and the idler jet is open.- When the throttle is opened by pressure on the throttle pedal, the switch 25 isopened and upon'the engine reaching a speed which would be equivalent to motion of the vehicle at, say, 15 to 17 m.p.h., the airstream produced by the fan and imposed on the vane23 is suflicient to overcome the bias of the spring 36 and cause the movement of the vane to the dotted line position with resultant closing of the switch 24. However, the switch 25 having'been opened by the opening of the throttle, the circuit remains open and the idler jet remains open. When, however, the vehicle is moving at a rate sufficient to cause the fan tohold the vane 23 in position closing the switch 24 and the throttle is closed with resultant closing of the switch 25 as in coasting down a grade or coasting to a stop, the circuit is closed, energizing the solenoid and closing the idler jet or jets. This preventsthe'drawing of excess fuel intothe engine cylinders and'thec'onsequent expulsion of unburned fuel through'the exhaust; This unburned fiuel has been shown by-repeated experiments to be the most important component ofthe various elements of smog which have a deleterious efiect on health and on plant life.

It is to be noted that the invention does not aifect the ordinary operation of the carburetor andthat it comes into action only at those timesin which the'presence of the generally necessary idler jetsresults-in adverse effects as well as causing waste of fuel;

Also in Figs. 1 and 10 there is shown in broken lines the use of the device with theelimination of the throttle operated switch. This is achieved by connecting the lead 46 directly to ground as indicatedinthe-said broken lines designated 46. Under these conditions" the idler jets are maintained closed by the solenoid valveor valves This arrangement is as satisfactory as the two switch is difficult and in which there is room for flyball type of speed responsive instrumentality as, for example on the end of a pump or generator shaft.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the i drive pulley end of the shaft of the generator G carries a flyball type of device generally indicated as 48 and including a base element 49 secured to the end of the shaft by a screw 50; said base element hingedly supporting an L-shaped member 51 including a normally horizontally disposed leg 52 and a vertical leg 53. A tension spring 54 normally holds the L-shaped member with the legs thereof disposed at an angle to the said vertical and horizontal positions as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 7. Under the influence of rotation centrifugal force will bring the L-shaped member to the full line position shown in Fig. 7; the weight of the part and the strength of the spring being such as to cause this movement when the rotation of the generator shaft is such as occurs when the engine is rotating at a speed sufiicient to move the vehicle at about l517 mph The free .end of the leg 52 terminates in a point disposed in the axial line of the rotation of the device when it is moved to its maximum position by centrifugal force. p

Mounted on the generator and overhanging the drive end isa bracket arm 55 carrying a normallyopen switch 56 including an operating plunger 57 at the free end thereof. The bracket arm 55 further included a pair of depending arms 58 at the said free end which arms pivotally support a contact operating member 59; said member including a depending portion 60 extending into thepath of operation of the leg 52 of the flyball device and a portion 61 extending upwardly across the path of movement of the switch operating plunger 57. The plunger 57 is spring biased outwardly and by engagement with the portion 61 of the contact operating member it causes the member to follow the inward and outward components of the movement of the leg 52 of the flyball device. When the engine is operating in lower ranges of speed, the flyball device allows the plunger 57 to moveoutwardly to the dotted line position of the member 59 which causes the switch to open and break the solenoid operating circuit. Asthe speed increases, the plunger 57 is forced inwardly closing the switch. p t

Means for disabling the device when the throttle is opened is also provided; said means comprising a reciprocable cable means including aflexible sheath 62 anda wire 63 slidable therein. One end of the wire 63 is attachedto the valve operating lever arm V by a screw 64 and the opposite end of the wire 63 is connected to the free end of the portion 61 of the contact operating mem ber through an interposed spring65. When the throttle is opened, the wire 63 will be caused to move the contact member portion 61 toward the switch beyond the contact making position with resultant movement of the end portion 60 thereof to the position shown in dot and dash lines out of the range of movement of the flyball device; the spring 65 allowing the movement of the throttle beyond the initial opening position and consequentdisabling of the switch operating means. When the throttle is closed, the engine speed will control the opening and closing of the switch. A lead 66 connects theswitch with the battery or other source of energy, a second lead 67 connects the switch with one lead of the solenoid valve 1 and a third lead 68 connects the opposite leadof the solenoid with the ground. Thus when the switch is closed, the solenoid valve means will close the idler jets and allow them to be open when the engine speed drops below a pre-determined minimum. The

throttle operated disabling means may be omitted, if desired as shown in Fig. 8 in which the same general organization of elements is shown with the exception of the addition of the biasing spring 69 to insure that the contact operating means will follow the flyball device.- Other than this addition, the parts have been given the same numbers as inFigs. 5, 6 and 7 with the addition of the exponent a.

Referring finally to Fig. 9 there is disclosed an embodiment of the device which in general resembles the first disclosed form except for the omission of the throttle operated switch and the inclusion of a throttle operated vane disabling means as a substitute for the throttle switch. In view of the fact that many identical parts are employed, such parts have been given the same identifying numerals as in Fig. 1 with the addition of the exponent a and will not be further described except as necessary to the description of the other parts. i

In this embodiment of the invention the vane carrying arm 26a is provided with a laterally extending arm 70 at the opposite side of the pivot pm 2711. The throttle operating rod P carries a depending arm 71 clamped there to by a screw 72 and the free end of the arm is connected by an interposed tension spring 73 to one end of a flexible, reciprocable member 74 contained in and guided by a flexiblepsheath element 75 having one end secured in a bracket 76 securedby one of the carburetor connecting bolts and having its other end secured in a clamp member 77 extending laterally from the under side of the horizontal bracket member 31a. The clamp member 77 is positioned to locate the end of :the reciprocable member 74. for movement vertically and the member 74 extends through an opening in the arm 70 and thence through a guiding opening in the bracketportiou 78 formed in an upward extension of the bracket arm 28a.

The flexible member 74 carriesa stop collar 79 fixed thereto by a set screw 80, and disposed between the arm 70 and the guide in the bracket portion 78. Additionally, the bracket a-rm 28a carries a torsion spring 81 having one end thereof securedthereto by a screw 82 and havmg its other end extending beneath the set screw 80; said torsion spring being constantly operative to urge movement of the adjacent end of the flexible member 74 upwardly in opposition to the pull thereon by theopenmg of the throttle. The circuit connections are the same as in Fig. 10 except that the lead 46 is dispensed with and the lead 47a extends from the solenoid valve to ground.

As shown, the throttle is closedand the spring 81 is holding the collar 79 clear of the arm 70, wherefore, the vane 23;: is free to respond to the action of the fan F to open or close the switch 24a. When the throttle isopened, the spring 73 overcomes the spring 81 and pulls the flexible member until the collar 79 contacts the arm 70 and moves the vane outwardly .to the extent permitted by the cotter pin 39a. This takes place during the first pornon of throttle opening movement and further opening of the throttle serves merely to extend the spring 73. In closing the throttle the spring73 gradually relaxes and when relaxed sufficiently, the spring 81 which has been under load, moves the fiexiblemember and the collar upwardly with incident release of the vane to its controlling funct on as in said first described form of the invention.

Thls embodiment of the invention is equally. efficient as the said first described form and is intended for use where the installation of a throttle operated switch is used, it is more readily installed: The-fact that each embodiment has some advantages and some disadvantages not possessed by other embodiments, andt'he wide variety 7 ofengine constructions encountered makes it necessary to provide an equivalent variety of operating means for the solenoid-operated idler jet control valve.

"Finally, attention is especially directed to the fact that snap switches are employed to control the circuit. Ordinary makeandbreak contact switches'may be used, but such switches operate at the identical position of the operating member. They can be used in the present invention butimportant operating characteristics will be lost by so doing. The operating member of a snap switch is moved to one position storing power in a spring to movethe-switch contacts to one position and must be movedor allowed to move to another position before the switch contacts move to the other position. One desirable feature-of a snap action switch is the fact that the possibility of chattering contact is eliminated, but the above described movement of the operating member has amore important and less obvious advantage in connection with the invention which will now be described.

1 It will be noted that the invention makes use of normally open snap switches. Due to this choice of switches, the" closing of the'switch will occur at a somewhat higher rate of engine speed as represented by the operation of the fly'ball device'or airstream produced by the fan than will exist at the opening of the switch. Specifically, using Fig. 1- as anexample, the switch operating member 34 is shown in switch opening position.- The switch will not be closed until the plunger is depressed substantially to the face of the switch and it will remain closed until the plunger has returned to about the position shown. The result is that while the switch will be closed with resultant closing of the idler jets upon reaching the desired conditions of. speed and throttle position, the idler jets will not be re-opened by opening of the switch until a somewhat lower speed is reached than that which caused the opening of the idler jets. Thus, under conditions of coasting down a grade or rolling up to a stop in which the engine is serving as a retarding means, the

idler jets are not opened to discharge excess fuel into and through the engine as soon as would be the case were simple contact switches to be employed.

While in the foregoingspecification there have been disclosed certain presently preferred embodiments of the invention, it is not to be inferred therefrom that the invention is limited to the exact form thereof so disclosed, and it will be understood that the invention includes all such changes and modifications in the parts and in the construction, combination and arrangement of parts as shall come within the purview of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In an engine'speed responsive control for vehicle engine carburetors, a normally open, electrically closed solenoid operated v'alvemeans mounted in the carburetor as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting screw, means electrically connecting the solenoid of said valve means with an electrical system including a switch and means responsive to the speed of the engine effective to close said switch during all times when the engine is operating above a predetermined speed with resultant energization of said solenoid and closure of the idler jet by said valve means during said times, said switch and engine speed responsive means being effective to maintain said idler jet valve means closed until and unless the engine speed decreases to a predetermined extent below the speed at which said switch was closed.

2. In an engine speed responsive control for vehicle engine carburetors, a solenoid operated valve means operable upon energization of the solenoid component thereof to close the idler jet of the carburetor, means electrically connecting said solenoid component with an electrical system including a normally open switch, and devices for closing said switch with resultant energization of said solenoid component; said devices comprising a vane disposed closely adjacent to the downstream side of the. engine cooling fan and having a face exposed to 8 the air stream delivered by the fan, means-for supportingsaid vane including resilient'mea'ns urging said vane in.

opposition to the air stream, and means connecting said vane with said switch; said resilient means being proportioned to allow the air stream to move saidvane when the speed of the engine and consequent speed of the fan exceeds a predetermined value and said movement of said vane being effective to close said switch and energize said solenoid.

3. A control device for the idler jet of a carburetor comprising a solenoid operated valve means attachable to the carburetor as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting screw; said valve means comprising an elongated, hollow valve guide having exterior threads at one end thereof engageable with the threads for the idler jet adjusting screw of the carburetor andhaving a valve guiding bore extending longitudinally thereof, a solenoid coil carried by the opposite end of said valve guide and disposed in axial alignment with said bore, a valve member freely slidable in said bore and having a conical end extending beyond said threaded end of said valve guide and adapted to engage the upstream side of the idler jet, an armature attached to the opposite end of said valve member and disposed within said solenoid coil, spring means normally operative to move said armature and valve member out of contact with the idler jet, and means for limiting the extent of axial movement of said armature and valve member away from the upstream side of the idler jet.

4. In an engine speed responsive control for the idler jet of a vehicle engine carburetor, a solenoid operated valve means mounted in the carburetor as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting screw, means electrically connecting the solenoid component of said valve means with a source of energy including a first normally open switch disposed in proximity to the carburetor throttle operating means, devices operated by the throttle operating means effective to close said first switch when the throttle approaches closed position, a second normally open switch and operating devices therefor responsive to the air stream delivered by the engine cooling fan effective to close said second switch during all times when the engine speed and resultant force of the air stream delivered by the fan exceeds a predetermined value.

5. In an engine speed responsive control for vehicle engine carburetors, a solenoid operated valve means operable upon energization of the solenoid component thereof to close the idler jet of the carburetor, means electrically connecting said solenoid component with an electrical system including a normally open switch, and devices for closing said switch with resultant energization of said solenoid component; said devices comprising a vane disposed closely adjacent to the downstream side of the engine cooling fan and having a face exposed to the airstream delivered by the fan, means for supporting said vane including resilient means urging said vane in opposition to the air stream, means connectnig said vane with said switch; said resilient means being proportioned to allow the air stream to move said vane when the speed of the engine and consequent speed of the fan exceeds a predetermined value and said movement of said vane being effective to close said switch and energize said solenoid, and other devices connected to the throttle operating means eifective upon opening of the throttle beyond a predetermined extent to disable said vane from responding tothe airstream of the fan.

6. In an engine speed responsive control for vehicle engine carburetors, a solenoid operated valvemeans operable upon energization of the solenoid component thereof to close the idler jet of the carburetor, means electrically connecting said solenoid component with an electrical system including a normally open switch, and devices for closing said switch with resultant energization ofsaid solenoid component; said devices comprising a means responsive to centrifugal force fixed to and rotatable with a 9 rotatable component of the engine connected to and operated by rotation of the engine crankshaft and including a spring, an element movable against the bias of said spring in response to centrifugal force derived from rotation of said component above a predetermined rate from aposition nearer to said component to a position further from said component, a follower yieldingly engaging said element and movable therewith, and means connecting said follower with said switch effective upon movement of said follower derived from rotation of said component above said predetermined rate to close said switch with resultant energization of said solenoid and closure of the idler jet.

7. In an engine speed responsive control for vehicle engine carburetors, a solenoid operated valve means operable upon energization of the solenoid component thereof to close the idler jet of the carburetor, means electrically connecting said solenoid component with an electrical system including a normally open switch, and devices for closing said switch with resultant energization of said solenoid component; said devices comprising a means responsive to centrifugal force fixed to and rotatable with a rotatable component of the engine connected to and operated by rotation of the engine crankshaft and including a spring, an element movable against the bias of said spring in response to centrifugal force derived from rotation of said component above a predetermined rate from a position nearer to said component to a position further from said component, a follower yieldingly engaging said element and movable therewith, means connecting said follower with said switch effective upon movement of said follower derived from rotation of said component above said predetermined rate to close said switch with resultant energization of said solenoid and closure of the idler jet, and means connected to throttle actuating means and operative upon opening of the throttle beyond a predetermined extent to disable said follower element.

8. In an engine speed responsive control for vehicle engine carburetors, a normally open solenoid valve means mounted in the carburetor as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting screw and including mounting means having capacity for adjustment relative to the idler jet orifice to determine the extent of open position; said valve means including a valve element movable into and out of engagement with the upstream side of the idler jet orifice as it is moved into closed and open positions, respectively, a

solenoid coil, and a reciprocable, para-magnetic armature attached to said valve element and mounted for reciprocable movement within said solenoid coil and so positioned therein as to be caused to move said valve element a into jet closing position upon energization of said solenoid coil, an electrical circuit connecting said coil with an electrical system, and control means for said circuit comprising a normally open switch and devices responsive to engine speed above a predetermined rate to close said switch with resultant completion of said circuit and consequent energization of said coil and closure of the idler jet by said valve means. 7

9. A control means as claimed in claim 8 in which said switch closing devices include a yieldingly mounted vane disposed at the downstream side of the engine cooling fan effective to be moved to close said switch by the air flow from the fan when the engine speed reaches a predetermined rate.

10. A control means as claimed in claim 8 in which said switch closing means includes a device responsive to centrifugal force mounted on a rotatable component of the engine driven by the engine crankshaft and including a spring and an element movable against the bias of said spring in response to increasing centrifugal force, a follower contacting said element and devices connecting said follower with said switch effective to close said switch when the speed of the engine reaches a predetermined rate.

11. A control means as claimed inclaim 8 which it cludes disabling means for said switch operating devices comprising a reciprocable element having one end connected to the throttle operating means of the vehicle and the other end connected to said switch operating devices and effective upon opening of the throttle beyond a predetermined extentto render said switch operating devices inoperable to close said switch.

12. A control means as claimed in claim 11 in which saidreciprocable element at its said other end is connected to said vane and is effective to hold said vane moved out of switch operatingposition.

13. A controlmeans as claimed in claim 9 which includes a reciprocable element having one end thereof connected to the throttle operating means of the vehicle and the other end thereof attached to said vane and effective to hold said vane moved out of switch closing position at all times when the throttle is moved beyond a predetermined extent of open position. a

14. A control means as claimed in claim 10 which includes a reciprocable element having one end connected to the throttle operating means of the vehicle and the other end thereof attached to said follower and elfective to hold said follower out of engagement with said centrifugal force responsive element and in switch closing position during all times when the throttle is opened beyond a predetermined extent.

15. In an engine speed responsive device for controlling the idler jet of the engine carburetor, a solenoid operated valve means employing the upstream side of the idler jet as a valve seat, means electrically connecting said valve means with an electrical system including a switch, devices responsive to the engine speed elfective to cause said switch to effect energization of said valve means with resultant closure of the idler jet when. the engine reaches a predetermined speed; said switch thereafter remaining closed until and unless the engine speed decreases to a predetermined extent below the speed at which said switch was closed, and other devices connected to the vehicle throttle effective to disable said speed responsive devices at all times when the throttle is opened beyond a pre determined extent.

16. In an engine speed responsive means for controlling the idler jet of the engine carburetor, a solenoid operative valve means mounted in the carburetor as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting screw, means electrically connecting the solenoid of said valve means with an electrical system including a snap switch having a reciprocable operating member movableto. eifect opening and closing of the switch contacts at different points, respectively, in its path of travel, and engine speed responsive devices engaging said operating member to effect closing of said idler jet by said valve means when the engine speed reaches and exceeds a predetermined value and thereafter to maintain the idler jet closed until the engine speed drops to a predetermined speed lower than the speed at which the idler jet was closed by said valve means.

17. In an engine speed responsive means for controlling.

the idler jet of the engine carburetor, a solenoid operated valve means mounted in the carburetor as a replacement for the idler jet adjusting screw, means electrically connecting the solenoid of said valve means with an electrical system including a normally open snap switch having a reciprocable operating member movable to cause opening and closing of the switch contacts at dilferent points, respectively, in its path of travel, and engine speed responsive devices engaging said operating member operative to effect closing of said switch and consequent closing of the idler jet by said valve means when the engine speed reaches a predetermined rate and to maintain said switch closed until the engine speed drops to a predetermined speed lower than the speed at which it was closed by said speed responsive devices.

.18. The combination with a carburetor for internal combustion engines of, speed. responsive devices for controlling fuel flow through the idler jet of the carburetor; said devices comprising an electrically operated valve means disposed in the path of fuel flow through the carburetor idler jet, and devices for actuating said valve means including a snap switch having a reciprocableoperating member movable to cause opening and closing of the switch contacts at different points, respectively, in its path of travel, and engine speed responsive devices engaging said operating member to effect opening of the idler jet by said valve means when the engine speed reaches a predetermined value and thereafter to maintain the idler jet closed until the engine speed drops to a predetermined speed which is lower than the speed at which the idler jet was closed by said valve means.

19. The combination with a carburetor for internal combustion engines of speed responsive devices for controlling fuel flow through the curburetor idler jet; said devices comprising an electrically operated valve means disposed in the path of fuel flow through the carburetor idler jet, and devices for actuating said valve means including a normally open snap switch having a reciprocable operating member movable to cause opening and closing of the switch contacts at different points, respectively, in its path of travel, and engine speed responsive devices engaging said operating member operative to effect closing of said switch and consequent closing of the idler jet by said valve means when the engine speed reaches a predetermined rate, and to maintain said switch I closed until the engine speed drops to a predetermined rate which is lower than the speed at which it was closed by said speed responsive devices.

, References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1650482 *Oct 5, 1925Nov 22, 1927Clinton F SeccombeFuel-control attachment for carburetors
US1711767 *Apr 19, 1926May 7, 1929Fred BardenFuel-control attachment for carburetors
US2415336 *Aug 7, 1944Feb 4, 1947Carter Carburetor CorpCarburetor degasser
US2466090 *Mar 1, 1946Apr 5, 1949R D Fageol CoEngine attachment
US2506511 *Aug 1, 1946May 2, 1950Mallory Res CoCombined carburetor and degasser
GB261022A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3297103 *Mar 24, 1964Jan 10, 1967Brooks WalkerEngine fuel supply
US3575148 *Mar 21, 1969Apr 20, 1971Earl W WalterVacuum control apparatus
US3678911 *Jun 29, 1970Jul 25, 1972Chrysler FranceSwitching-off device for internal combustion engine fed by a dual-body carburetor
US3702603 *Nov 13, 1970Nov 14, 1972Brica Eng LtdInternal combustion engines
US3721221 *Feb 27, 1970Mar 20, 1973Nippon Denso CoInternal combustion engine exhaust gas controlling device
US3847125 *Jan 26, 1973Nov 12, 1974A MalherbeCarburetor
US3996908 *Feb 21, 1975Dec 14, 1976General Motors CorporationFuel shut-off valve assembly
US3996909 *Feb 21, 1975Dec 14, 1976General Motors CorporationFuel shut-off valve assembly
US4050436 *Mar 17, 1976Sep 27, 1977Crabtree Roger AIdle system blocking means
US4091777 *Apr 2, 1976May 30, 1978Societe Anonyme D.B.A.Electronic control circuit for a carburetor device
US4169450 *Mar 18, 1977Oct 2, 1979Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaInternal combustion engine for an automobile provided with an air-conditioner
US4183336 *Dec 19, 1977Jan 15, 1980Ecotroleum, Inc.Fuel-air control device
US4243002 *Jun 15, 1978Jan 6, 1981Audi Nsu Auto Union AktiengesellschaftFuel injection system for an internal combustion engine
US4304200 *Feb 28, 1980Dec 8, 1981Audi Nsu Auto Union AktiengesellschaftFuel injection systems for mixture compressing spark-ignition internal combustion engine
US4329969 *Mar 6, 1980May 18, 1982Mitsuji KawaiDirect air cooling device for the combustion chamber of the internal combustion engine in an automobile
US5337715 *Nov 13, 1992Aug 16, 1994Ford Motor CompanyEngine deceleration intake air flow reduction and fuel shut-off control
WO1984000194A1 *Jun 24, 1982Jan 19, 1984Prochazka AnezkaFuel control for internal combustion engines
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/585, 123/327, 180/335, 123/198.00D, 261/DIG.190
International ClassificationF02M3/045
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/19, F02M3/045
European ClassificationF02M3/045