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Publication numberUS2886321 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1959
Filing dateJan 9, 1957
Priority dateJan 9, 1957
Publication numberUS 2886321 A, US 2886321A, US-A-2886321, US2886321 A, US2886321A
InventorsJr Franklin E Tarte
Original AssigneeJr Franklin E Tarte
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary pocketed target
US 2886321 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 1 2, 1959 F. E. TARTE, JR 2,886,321

ROTARY POCKETED TARGET Filed Jan. 9; 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 May 12, 1959 E. TARTE, JR

' ROTARY ,BOCKETED TARGET Filed Jan. 9, 1957 May 12, 1959 F. E. TARTE, JR 2,836,321

' ROTARY POCKETED TARGET Filed Jan. 9, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 AN A! III! United States Patent ROTARY POCKETED TARGET Franklin E. Tarte, In, Media, Pa.

Application January 9, 1957, Serial No. 633,353

15 'Claims. (Cl. 273-105) The present application constitutes a continuation-inpart of U.S. application Ser. No. 371,603, filed July 31, 1953. and now abandoned.

This invention relates to game devices in which target receptacles are provided and scoring plays are made by throwing or tossing a missile, such as a ball, through the target receptacles.

One object of this invention is to provide a novel game device which afiords recreation and amusement and which is conducive to the development of skill on the part of the players. The device is adaptable for use in public places and it may be coin-controlled if desired.

Another object of the invention is to provide a rotatable target receptacle apparatus which has a plurality of integral target receptacles through which a missile, such as a ball, may pass, resulting in scoring plays.

A further object of theinvention is to provide a game device wherein a variable test of skill is possible. One means of varying the skill required is to provide target openings of the target receptacles which can be easily and quickly varied to accommodate the skill and wish of the player or players, thereby making the target openings of the target receptacles either larger or smaller. In this arrangement the target is preferably maintained stationary during use. Alternatively, however, a moving target is employed and such a target may provide a variable test of skill simply by variation of the speed of movement even with openings of equal size.

A further object of the invention is to provide an arrangement whereby the rotatable target unit may be variously driven to bring the target receptacles successively into a target position in confronting relation to a playing position. Alternatively, the rotatable target unit may be continuously driven to provide a moving target.

Other objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is aperspective view of a game device according to the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view taken centrally of the device;

Fig. 3 is a sectional plan view taken on line 33 of 2;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of one of the basket rims;

Fig. 5 is a face view of one of the spring detent devices employed to removably retain each basket rim;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken on line 6-6 of Fig. 5';

Fig; 7 is a sectional elevational view of the driving mechanism for the rotatable target unit;

Fig. 8 is a bottom view of the mechanism shown in Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 7; and

Fig. 10 is a sectional plan view similar to Fig. 3 but showing a modified form of the invention.

Referring first to Figs; 11 andi3, in the form of the device shown a rectangular baseboard 10 is mounted on side supporting rails 11 and serves to support the entire structure of the device. Asmay be seentin Fig. 2,. the rear- 2,886,321 Patented May 12, 1959 ward portion of the baseboard 10 is horizontal while the forward portion is slightly declined forwardly to serve as a runway for the returning missiles, such as balls, used in the playing of the game. At the front end of the baseboard there is a retaining wall 12 to stop the returning missiles.

At the rear portion of the baseboard 10 there is a housing 13, which is closed at its top, bottom, sides and rear, but which has a relatively large rectangular opening 14 in its front wall 15. Disposed mainly within the housing or enclosure 13 is a rotatable target unit designated generally by reference numeral 16. The target unit comprises a hollow structure 17 which includes an upstanding wall of polygonal shape horizontally, which structure 17 is mounted for rotary movement about a substantially vertical axis. In the form shown, the upstanding wall is of pentagonal shape horizontally so that it has five vertical faces designated respectively 18 to 22. At its bottom the structure 17 is provided with a mounting hub 23 which is secured to a rotatable vertical shaft 24 as by means of pin 25. The top of structure 17 is apertured to receive a fixed stud 26 held by a set screw 27 in a supporting bracket 28 which is secured to the front wall 15 of housing 13, as by means of securing bolts 29. The supporting shaft 24 is driven by means of a drive mechanism designated generally by reference numeral 30, which will be described later.

The upstanding wall of structure 17 serves to support a plurality of target receptacles, there being five such receptacles in the illustrated embodiment designated respectively 31 to 35. Preferably, the target receptacles are in the form of baskets which are substantially replicas of the basket commonly employed in the game of basketball. The baskets are secured to the respective vertical faces 18 to 22 of structure 17, which faces serve as backboards for the baskets. Preferably, the baskets are of progressively decreasing size so that they have target openings .of progressively decreasing size. Extending from the structure 17 entirely about the same is an outwardly declined apron 36 having apertures therein through which extend the lower portions of the baskets. Extending radially from the apices of the pentagonal structure 17 are vertical walls 37 to 41 which serve cooperatively with the apron 36 to provide individual alcoves for the baskets, as may be clearly seen in Fig. 1.

As may be seen in Figs 1 and 2, a forwardly declined platform 42 extends forwardly from the front wall 15 of housing 13, and at the front of the platform 42 there is a transverse elongate opening 43. The platform 42 has an arcuate edge 44 at which there is mounted an arcuate wall or baffle 45 which is in close proximity to the outer edge of apron 36. Beneath the platform 42, and extending rearwardly from the opening 43 is a forwardly declined runway 46. As may be seen in Fig. 3, the runway 46 has rearward extensions 47, the purpose of which will be explained presently.

In operation of the device, the target unit 16' is rotated to bring the target receptacles or baskets successively into a target position in confronting relation to a playing position in front of the device. In the position of the target unit shown in the drawings, basket 31 is in the target. position in confronting relation to the playing position. It is desired that anindication be given whenever a thrown missile passes through a target receptacle, and for this purpose micro-switch 48 (-see Figs. 2 and 3) is mounted on runway 46 by means of a bracket 49. The micro-switch is actuated by a lever 50 pivoted at 51 on wall 15. The lever 50 has an arcuate portion 52 which underlies the path of movement of the baskets forwardly of the wall 15. A missile, or. ball, passing through a forwardly disposed. basket. will drop to the front of the device. continuously, the arcuate portion 52 of the switch-actuating lever will assure that the switch will be operated be seen.

' quarters of play is declared the winner.

1 3 onto the arcuate portion 52 of lever 50 and thus actuate switch 48. After striking the arcuate portion 52 the missile will drop onto the runway 46 and roll forwardly If the target unit is driven throughout the range of said portion. The switch may serve to energize an indicating lamp 53 which may be mounted on bracket 54 behind a window opening 55 in wall 15. However, the switch may also serve to operate an electrical counter.

The purpose of extensions 47 on runway 46 may now drop onto one of the extensions 47 and roll forwardly.

In accordance with a further feature of the invention, the baskets are readily removable to enable revshown in Figs. 4 to 6. Each basket comprises a rim 56 having extending parallel arms 57 terminating in pin portion 58 each having a groove 59 therein. Each of the basket-supporting faces of structure 17 has a pair of apertures 60 to receive the pin portions 58 of the basket rim, and on the inside of each face in association with the apertures there is mounted a spring retainer 61 of the form shown inFig. 5, the .retainer being held by a screw 62. It will be seen that the retainer has two inwardly extending arms 63 which are adapted to seat in the grooves 59 when the pin portions 58 are inserted through the wall apertures. Thus, the spring retainer 61 serves to lock the rim to the wall until such time as the rim is removed. While a particular removable mounting is provided for each basket, as just described, the invention contemplates any suitable arrangement.

, Before considering the structure and operation of the drive mechanism 30 (Fig. 2) for moving the target unit, it is advisable to have clearly in mind the preferred way of using the device in the playing of the game. In the illustrated embodiment there are five baskets which de crease in size progressively beginning with the largest basket 31 and ending with the smallest basket 35. Baskets 31 to 34 may represent the four playing periods or quarters of a basketball game, and basket 35 may represent an additional playing period or quarter which is only played in the event of a tie. Starting with the largest basket in target position, as shown in Figs. 1 to 3, each player or team of players takes a prescribed number of shots at the basket 31. In making the shots the ball may be tossed or thrown in any desired manner, for example in the manner of tossing or throwing darts. If desired the throwing or tossing of balls may be done by a mechnical device rather than directly by the players. After all of the players or teams have completed their shots at basket 31, thus completing the first quarter of playing, the same procedure is followed with each of the baskets 32, 33 and 34 in the target position. The player or team having the highest score at the end of the four In the event of a tie an extra quarter may be played with the fifth target 35 in target position.

The game may be played using various modes of actuation of the rotatable target unit which are afforded by the drive mechanism 30 shown in Figs. 7 to 9. The target unit may be actuated in response to any one of four control switches to give any one of the following five operations:

(1) Movement of the target unit from one position to another to move one'basket out of target position and to move the next basket into target position.

(2) Automatic intermittent movement of the target unit to effect automatic movement thereof from position If a thrown ball should drop from a basket at about an end of the arcuate portion 52, the ball may to position, with each basket remaining in the target position for a predeterminedtime interval.

(3) Continuous slow movement of the target unit through a complete revolution, so that the baskets move continuously at a slow rate of travel and move successively through the target position.

(4) Continuous rotation of Y the target unit through more than one revolution.

(5) Continuous rotation as in either paragraphs 3 or 4 abovebut with the speed of movement variable.

Referring now to Figs. 7 to 9, the drive mechanism 30 (Fig. 2) for supporting the driving shaft 24 of the target unit may take the form. shown, as now to be described. The lower end of shaft 24 is supported in a sleeve bearing 64 which is seated in a recess 65 in a supporting base member 66 formed of insulating material such as wood. The lower end of the shaft rests on a ball 67 disposed atthe bottom of the recess, which serves as a' thrust bearing. The shaft extends vertically through a casing 68 which has an aperture 69 to accommodate the upwardly extending shaft. Within the casing 68 the shaft has an enlarged portion 70 providing upper and lower shoulders against which the hubs 71 and 72 of gear 73 and member 74 abut. The latter are loose on the shaft for a purpose presently to be described. Collars 75 and 76 are secured to the shaft, as by means of screws, and serve cooperatively with the above-mentioned shoulders to retain the gear 73 and member 74 against movement longitudinally of the shaft.

Mounted in spaced relation to the shaft 24 is a short vertical shaft 77 which is journaled in bearing 78 supported by a bracket 79- Secured to the upper end of shaft 77, as by meansof a screw, is a double gear member 80 having gear sections 81 and 82. Secured to the lower end of shaft 77, as by means of a screw, is a member 83 having a crank arm 84 which forms with member 74 a Geneva drive. Fixedly secured to bracket 79 is an upwardly extending pin 85 which serves to rotatably support a gear member having a pinion section 86 and a worm gear section 87, said member being rotatable on a sleeve bearing 88 The worm gear 87 meshes with a worm 89 on the shaftof a driving motor 90 which is mounted on bracket 91.

It will be seen that gear 73 is driven continuously by the motor 90 as long as the latter is in operation, and the crank arm 84 is also driven continuously by the motor. Thus, gear 73 is driven through the train of gears comprising pinion 86 and' gear sections 81 and 82. The crank arm 84 is driven through pinion 86 and gear 81.

The crank arm 84 has a depending pin 92 and a sector 93. In association therewith is the other part 74 of the Geneva drive. As will be understood, in this known form of drive, rotation of the crank arm 84 efiects rotary stepping movement of member 74 each time the pin 92 enters one of the slots 94. In the intervals between the stepping movement of member 84 the latter is held stationary by engagement of the sector 93 with one of the arcuate surfaces 95.

It will be seen from the foregoing that as long as the motor 90 is in operation, the gear 73 is continuously ro tated while member 74 is actuated in a step-by-step movement. It will be recalled that gear 73 and member 74 are loose on shaft 24, and as now to be described, an arrangement is provided for selectively coupling gear 73 and member 74 to the shaft, thereby to effect either continuous rotary movement of the shaft or intermittent movement thereof. The hubs 71 and 72 of gear 73 and member 74 respectively are provided with recesses 96 and 97 which are adapted respectively to receive pins 98 and 99 on a slidabl'e coupler 100. The latter is slidable on the enlarged portion 70 of the shaft and is splined thereto by a spline projection 101 on the shaft engaging a splinerecess on the coupler. The coupler has spaced flanges 102 and 103 between which a shifting pin 104 is disposed. The-pin is eccentrically disposed ona circular head 105 at the inner end of a shaft 106, the said end being rotatably supported in a stationary support 107. As may be seen in Fig. 2, the shaft 106 extends forwardly of the game device to the front thereof, through apertures in walls 15 and 12 by which it is rotatably supported. At the front end of the shaft 106 there is provided a knob 108 by means of which the shaft may be manually rotated. The knob 108 is adapted to be posiioned in three discrete positions at right angles to one another as indicated by the indicia on the front of wall 12 in Fig. 1. As shown in Fig. 7, the knob 108 carries a spring-pressed indexing ball 109 which is biased forwardly by spring 110 and which is adapted to enter a recess provided in wall 12 at each of the above-mentioned positions. When the knob 108 is in the vertical position, as shown in Fig. 7, the coupler 100 is not in engagement either with the gear 73 or with member 74, and, therefore shaft 24 is not driven. When the knob is moved to its right-hand position, the coupler 100 engages gear 73 and couples it to the shaft 24. When the knob is moved to its left-hand position, the coupler 100 engages member 74 and couples it to the shaft 24.

The electrical elements and connections for control-ling the operation of the motor 90 are shown in Fig. 7. Intermittent actuation of shaft 24, is effected through operation of relay 111 and the Geneva drive above-described. Remembering that there are five targets on the target unit in the illustrated embodiment, there are correspondingly five sections on the member 74 of the Geneva drive. In the stopped condition of the device prior to commencement of a game, the target unit is preferably in the position shown in Figs. 1 to 3, and the parts of the operating mechanism are in the positions shown in Figs. 7 and 8. Rotation of knob 108 to its ileft-hand position as above-described elfects coupling of shaft 24 to the Geneva drive. Closure of push-button switch 112 energizes relay 111 through a circuit extending from terminal 113, through the relay winding, through switch 112, and through closed contact elements 114, 115 and 116 to the other supply terminal 117. Contact elements 114 and 1161 are stationary elements, While switch element 115 is in the form of a disk mounted on shaft 106 and insulated therefrom, the disk constantly engaging element 116 and having a button 115a which engages element 114 only when the knob 108 is in its left-hand position. The closure of the contacts 118 of relay 111 completes an energizing circuit for motor 90, which circuit extends from terminal 113 to the motor and then through contacts 118 and the closed contact elements 114, 115 and 116 to the other terminal 117. As soon as the motor starts, the crank arm 84 commences to rotate counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 8, and pin 92 leaves an aperture 119 in a stationary metal disk 120 supported by screw 121 which .is held by the base member 66. Engagement of the lower end of pin 92 with the disk 120 completes a circuit branch about the switch 112 through connection 122 and the metal parts of the mechanism and through closed contact elements 123 and 114. Element 123 is a pin on shaft 106 which engages element 114 when the knob 108 is in its left-hand position. Thus, it is only necessary to hold switch 112 closed for a very short interval until pin 92 moves out of the aperture .119 and completes a branch circuit about the switch as just described. The operation of the Geneva drive eifects movement of the target unit from one position to the next position. At the end of a complete revolution of crank arm 84, pin 92 again enters to the next position in the manner just described.

When it is desired to effect automatic intermittent movement of the target unit from one position to another,

switch 124 is closed andremains closed until such time as it is desired to stop the operation. This switch shortcircuits switch 112 and also renders the above-described 'branch'circuit ineffective. The relay 111 isenergized through a circuit extending from terminal 113 through the relay Winding, through switch 124, and through the closed contactelements 114, 115 and 116 to terminal 117. The relay remains energized until such time as switch 124 is opened, and the Geneva drive moves the target intermittently, each basket remaining in the target position for a predetermined period of time depending upon the speed of rotation of arm 84. Upon opening of switch.124, the mechanism will .stop when pin 92 arrives at-aperture 119.

When it is desired to'efiect continuous movement of the target unit through one complete revolution, the knob 108 is turned to its right-hand position, and push-button switch 125 is closed. This switch completes an energizing circuit for relay 126, which circuit extends from terminal 113, through the relay winding, through switch 125, and through closed contact elements 127, 115 and 116 to terminal 117. Element 127 is a stationary contact element which is engaged by the button 115a of element 115 whenever knob 108 is in its right-hand position. The closure of relay contacts 128 completes an energizing circuit for motor which extends from terminal 113 through the motor, through closed contacts 128 and through elements 127, and 116 to the other terminal 117. As soon as the motor starts, the rotation of gear 73 effects closure of a micro-switch 129 which was held open by a projection 130 on the side of gear 73. Closure of the microswitch 129 closes a circuit branch about switch which may then open. The energizing circuit for relay 126 then extends from terminal 113 to the relay winding, through conductor 131 to switch 129, and through the contact elements 127, 115 and 116 to terminal 117. The target unit then rotates slowly through a complete revolution until switch 129 is opened bythe projection cm gear 7 3.

Continuous rotation of the target unit through more than one revolution may be effected by closing switch 132 which'is connected in shunt relation with switch 129. Relay 126 is then energized independently of switch 125 through a circuit which extends from terminal 113, through the relay winding, through conductor 131, through switch 132 and through the closed contact elements 127, 115 and 116 to terminal 117. The target unit will then rotate slowly until such time as switch 132 is opened and the projection 130 on gear 73 opens switch 129.

The modified arrangement shown in Fig. 10 wherein all of the baskets are of the same size is particularly adapted to this last form of continuous movement. As will be seen by a comparison with Fig. 3, all parts are the same as in Fig. 3 except the baskets which are designated 31, 32, 33', 34, 35 and all of which are the same size. Thus, in this case where the skill involved is not merely hitting a target but hitting a moving target, particularly, where time of play is unlimited, it is of advantage to keep the baskets the, same size. An element of variation can still be provided, however, by providing a multiple speed drive, through a gear shifting arrangement, multiple speed motor, etc., and such an arrangement can'even provide for periodic automatic increases in speed of rotation.

As shown by the foregoing description, the first four switches. 112, 124, 125 and 132 control the four modes of operation of the target unit. These switches may .be located on wall 12 at the front of the game device, as shown in Fig. 1. Switches 112 and 125 are push-button switches which are spring-biased to open position so that they open upon release. Switches Y124 and 132 may be conventional toggle switches. Additional switching will, of course, have to be provided for multiple speed operation, but various means of accomplishing this will readily occur to those skilled in the art.

From the foregoing description .it will be seen that the present invention provides a game device embodying desirable features, and the movable'target unit of which may I be variously operated as above-described. While a particular embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described, the invention is not limited thereto, but

contemplates such further embodiments and modifica- 7 tions as may occur to persons skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. In a game device having a unique playing position, a target unit mounted for rotary movement about a substantially vertical axis spaced from said playing position,

a plurality of target receptacles on said unit in surrounding relation to said axis having target openings disposed substantially horizontally which are brought successively into a target position in confronting relation to the playing position by rotary movement of said unit, whereby a player in the playing position may throw one or more 'missiles at each target opening, vertical walls on said unit defining individual alcoves for said receptacles and having deflecting surfaces by which the missiles may be deflected into the target openings, and a housing shielding at least half of the rotatable target unit from the playing target receptacles are in the form of baskets.

6. In a game device having a unique playing position, a target unit mounted for rotary movement about a substantially vertical axis spaced from said playing position, said unit comprising a structure of substantial depth and including an upstanding wall, baskets mounted on said upstanding wall in circumferentially spaced relation about said substantially vertical axis so as to be brought successively into a target position in confronting relation to the playing position upon rotation of said unit,

whereby a player in the playing position may throw one or more missiles at each basket, and a housing shielding at least half of the rotatable target unit from the playing position.

7. The game device of claim 6 in which the target openings are all of the same size and are adapted to be continuously moved during the course of play.

8. The game device of claim 6 'in which the target openings are of progressively decreasing size.

9. A game device according to claim 6, further comprising an outwardly declined apron extending from said structure entirely about the same and having apertures through which the lower portions of the baskets extend, and vertical walls extending outwardly from said upstanding wall in circumferentially spaced relation about said substantially vertical axis and serving cooperatively with said apron to provide individual alcoves for the baskets.

10. In a game device, a target unit mounted for rotary movement, a plurality of targets on said unit which are brought successively into a target position in confronting relation to a playing position by rotary movement of said unit, drive means to impart rotary movement to the target unit, means to establish discrete positions of said unit in each of which a target is in the target position, manually-operable means to initiate movement of said unit, means responsive to operation of said last means to efifect movement of said unit from one discrete position to a second discrete position so as to move one target out of target position and to move the next target into target position, means associated with the drive means assuring that each successive target will stop in target position, and means operative upon arrival of said unit at said second position to automatically stop the movement of said unit.

11. In a game device, a target unit mounted for rotary 8 brought successively into a target position in confronting relation to a playing position by rotary movement of said unit, drive means to impart rotary movement to the target unit, means to establish discrete positions of said unit in eachof which a target is in the target position,

means associated with the drive means assuring that each successive target will stop in target position, a push-button, means responsive to manual operation of said push-button to effect movement of said unit from one discrete position to a second discrete position so as to move one target out of target position and to move the next target into target position, and means operative upon arrival of said unit at said second position to automatically stop the movement of said unit.

12. A game device according to claim 11, wherein the means for moving said unit includes a motor-operated Geneva drive mechanism.

13. In a game device, a target unit mounted for rotary movement, a plurality of targets on said unit which are brought successively into a target position in confronting relation to a playing position by rotary movement of said unit, a motor for driving a target unit, manually operable means to initiate movement of the motor and a Geneva drive coupling the target unit to the motor in order to effect automatic intermittent rotary movement of said unit to effect positioning of each target in said target position for a predetermined time interval, said coupling assuring that every target will stop in succession in target position.

14. In a game device, a target unit mounted for rotary movement about a substantially vertical axis, a plurality of target receptacles on said unit in surrounding relation to said axis having respectively difierent sized target openings disposed substantially horizontally which are brought successively into a target position in confronting relation to a playing position by rotary movement of said unit, a motor for the target unit, manually operable means to initiate movement of the motor, and a Geneva drive coupling the target unit to the motor-in order to effect automatic intermittent rotary movement of said unit to effect positioning of each target in said target position for a predetermined time interval, said coupling assuring that every target will stop in succession in target position whereby a player in the playing position may throw one or more missiles at each target opening.

15. In a game device having a unique playing position, a target unit mounted for rotary movement about a substantially vertical axis spaced from said playing position, a plurality of target receptacles on said unit in surrounding relation to said axis having target openings disposed substantially horizontally which are brought successively into a target position in confronting relation to the playing position by rotary movement of said unit, manually operable means to initiate movement of said unit, means responsive to operation of said first means for driving said unit slowly through a single complete revolution to effect movement of each target slowly through said target position, whereby a player in the playing position may throw one or more missiles at each target opening, means operative upon the arrival of said unit at its starting position to automatically stop the movement of said unit, the means for automatically stopping movement being inaccessible to the player, and a housing shielding at least half of the rotatable target unit from the playing position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,211,379 Maisch Jan. 2, 1917 1,559,140 Wolkenhauser Oct. 27, 1925 1,574,201 Lynch Feb. 23, 1926 1,616,270 Madden Feb. 1, 192.7 1,695,937 Welch Dec. 18, 1928 2,617,653 Keller Nov. 11, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 976,896 France r Nov."1', 1950

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Referenced by
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US3112109 *Aug 12, 1960Nov 26, 1963Young Lyman WMissile shooting toy
US3599976 *Oct 13, 1969Aug 17, 1971Paul S Krajac JrGame boards with clamping means
US3612528 *Mar 28, 1969Oct 12, 1971Marvin Glass & AssociatesDeformable projectile and target having a variable opening
US3862760 *Dec 13, 1973Jan 28, 1975Davis F DarellMiniature golf game
US4202543 *Sep 1, 1977May 13, 1980Collins Andrew PRecreational basketball court facility
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US4268029 *Feb 11, 1980May 19, 1981Collins Andrew PRecreational basketball apparatus with multiple moving goals
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US6508730 *Mar 6, 2001Jan 21, 2003Delbert Clarke PileApparatus for a retractable basketball backboard and hoop assembly
US6736741 *Jan 16, 2003May 18, 2004Delbert Clarke PileApparatus and method for a retractable basketball backboard and hoop assembly
US7094165Mar 2, 2004Aug 22, 2006Delbert Clarke PileApparatus and method for a retractable basketball backboard and hoop assembly
US7393292Jul 14, 2006Jul 1, 2008Delbert Clarke PileApparatus and method for a retractable basketball backboard and hoop assembly
US7887059 *May 27, 2009Feb 15, 2011James Edward KiernanBag toss golf game and game target
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/368, 273/354, 273/375
International ClassificationA63F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0243
European ClassificationA63F9/02B3