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Publication numberUS2886699 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1959
Filing dateSep 23, 1957
Priority dateSep 23, 1957
Publication numberUS 2886699 A, US 2886699A, US-A-2886699, US2886699 A, US2886699A
InventorsDonald W Harling
Original AssigneeMc Graw Edison Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluorescent luminaire
US 2886699 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1959 D. w. HARLING FLUORESCENT LUMINAIRE Filed Sept. 25, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 lNVENT OR.

D naZd ZM HarZ/ky BY 5144/ fitter?? D. w. HARLING 2,886,699

FLUORESCENT LUMINAIRE May 12, 1959 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 23, 1957 I k n i iilllllli l 1m" a INVENTOR. DonaZa 2% fiaria'n [f BY fa 5 4 2% "him D. w. HARLlNG 2,886,699

FLUORESCENT LUMINAIRE May 12, 1959 Filed Sept. 25, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. .Dmmid ZU. 7hr? nited States Patent FLUORESCENT LUMINAIRE Donald W. Harling, South Milwaukee, Wis, assignor to McGraw-Edison Company, Milwaukee, Wis., a corporation of Delaware Application September 23, 1957, Serial No, 685,439

4 Claims. (Cl. 24025) This invention relates to fluorescent type luminaires and more particularly to fluorescent luminaires for street lighting and the like.

Fluorescent luminaires utilized for lighting highways are generally mounted on a pole and at a considerable distance above the ground. in both installation and maintenance, the lineman is working from a ladder or the like and, hence, ease of original installation, and ease of access to and handling of all parts of the fluorescent luminaire during maintenance is particularly important.

It is an object of this invention to provide a fluorescent luminaire which is particularly well adapted for easy installation to pole mounted supporting means by one man standing in an elevated position on a ladder or the like.

It is another object of this invention to provide a novel method of installation of a fluorescent luminaire wherein the parts may be individually mounted as .separate components, thus, afiording easy installation because of the relatively lighter weight of the individual components as compared to the total weight of the luminaire.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a novel method of mounting a fluorescent luminaire having outer housing means to a pole support comprising, mounting a portion of the housing upon the support means in an inverted position relative to its normal operating position upon the support means, then installing several of the components upon the housing portionprior 'to rotating the housing to its normal operating position, thus, the inverted housing affords a convenient easy place to rest tools and the like as well as allowing a workman to be working on top of rather than underneath the luminaire housing while installing the other components and making electrical connections, etc.

It is another object of this invention to provide a fluorescent luminaire having a separate component comprising unitary reflector assembly including junction block'terminals, lamp holders, lamps, reflecting surfaces, all of which may be quickly and easily attachably and detachably mounted as a unit relative to the rest of the luminaire when mounted on a pole in an elevated position.

Another object of the invention is to provide a luminaire as above set forth wherein the unitary reflector assembly is hingedly mounted relative to the rest of the .luminaire such that the entire subassembly may be pivo'tally swung away therefrom to provide access to electrical connections, ballast, mounting means, etc., Without necessitating the removal of lamps from the lamp holder thereby-reducing breakage of lamps and disturbance of the factory set optical relationships of lamp holders to reflecting surfaces.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a luminaire assembly wherein the electrical circuits may be conveniently checked without necessitating removal of the lamps from the reflector assembly.

A further object of the invention is to provide a luminaire as set forth above wherein the reflector assembly is latched into position by a manually operable spring loaded latch means that afiords "quick easy accesswithout 'the use of tools.

A further object of the'invention' is to-provide'in adevice of the type aforementioned, quick attachable and detachable electrical junction block means mounted on the reflector suba'ssembly' which aflfords both speedy and easy initial wiring as well as repair work all of which may be done without tools.

A further object of this inventionis to provide a reflector assembly as above described having a particular spacial relationship of lamps which provides aneven light pattern with a minimum of glare.

It is a further object of this invention to'provide a. luminaire as above described having spaced back-to-back parabolic reflecting surfaces which areconnected by an intermediate surface portion, said intermediate connecting surface portion being of a configuration adapted to concentrate radiant energy from lamps spaced therebelow in a manner to heat up said lamps to thereby increase the operational efliciency of the lamps when exposed to very cold temperatures and simultaneously eliminate hot spots 'of light below the luminaire.

Another object of the invention is to provide a luminaire for street lighting and the like which is shallow in height as respect to width, said relationship tending to keep the wind loading of the luminaire at a minimum to reduce'the size of support structure for the luminaire.

It is a further'object of this invention to provide aireflector assembly as above described which divides the outer casing of the luminaire into upper and lower l'chambers, said reflector assembly being adapted to prevent radiant heat from the lampsourcesfrom impinging upon the ballasts located inthe upper chambers to thereby not increase the temperature surroundingwthe said ballasts.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a luminaire as outlined above that is well adapted for. mass manufacture, is easy to assemble and maintain, isupleasing in appearance, has a long fieldlife and is otherwise well adapted for the purposes forwhich it was designed.

The novel features that .are characteristic of :the "invention are set forth with particularity in thexappended claims. The invention itself, however, "both as to its organization and its method of operation, together with additional objects iand advanta ges thereof will bCSKFlJB understood by the :followingrdescription of specific embodiments when read in connection with accompanying drawings inwhich:

Fig. '1 is a side view of a fluorescent .luminaire .for'st 'cet lighting purposes mounted in its normal operative position relative to a pole bysuitable mounting means, a portion of said v-iew being in section;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken alongline 2-2 of :Fig. 1, the mounting pipe being omitted;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view ofthe reflector assembly with the lamps removed therefrom, a portion ofthe electrical circuitry being shown in semi-diagrammatical form;

Fig. 4 is a so-calledreflection diagram of the optical characteristics of the reflector assembly shown in Figs.

1-3, inclusive;

Fig. 5 is a pictorial representation of the vertical and horizontal light patterns provided by a luminaire of the type shown in Figs. 1-4, inclusive;

Fig. *6 is a semi-diagrammatic view similar to Figs 4 showing a reflection diagram for an alternative emb odiment of reflector configuration;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Figs. 4 and 6 showing areflection'diagram for another alternative embodiment of reflector assembly;

Fig. '8 is .a view similar to Figs. 5 6.and 7 showinga reflection diagram of an alternative spacial relationship of lamps to each other as Rwell as toreflector, land in .addition' showing an alternative configuration of ireflector surfaces;

. plete assembly is rather bulky. :v the components may be readily handled by one man. -In order to provide an easy, one man field assembly of the junction block assembly which is mounted on the reflector assembly, said view showing the quick attachable and detachable electric connection means; Fig. is a bottom plan view of the upper housing shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the-reflector assembly, electrical components and globe assembly being removed;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view showing a col- -larassembly which coacts with the support means;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view showing the upper housing mounted in an inverted position as compared to its normal operating position prior to assembling the other components thereto in the initial installation of the luminaire.

; Before giving a detailed descriptionof the precise configuration and cooperation of the components of the fluorescent luminaire, a short enumeration of the major components and the novel method of their fieldassembly f shall be described.

The major components of the luminaire are the upper outer housing means 14, the detachable globe assembly means 15, the unitary reflector assembly 16 and electrical control means 19. The total weight of all the aforementioned components is relatively large and the com? However, individually the luminaire in an elevated position, a support means 12 is first positioned upon a suitable pole 11 at a predeter:

I mined elevated height such as 30 feet or the like above the street level. fixed at a predetermined angle generally transverse of the street that is to be lighted. As perhaps best shown in 1 Figs. 1, 10 and 12, thevsupport means 12 has an elon- The support means 12 is generally gated portion 12a which may take the form of a pipe or the like and a secondary depending supporting portion 12b. The electric input leads for the luminaire are preferably brought in through the interior of the support means 12.

In order to assemble the components in the field, the housing means 14 is formed with an aperture at one end, said aperture being adapted to receive the elongated portion 12a of thesupport means. The housing means 14 is preliminarily mounted in the up side down position shown in Fig. 12. A collar a which is fixed to the houslng means 14 adjacent the aperture in the housing provides a good suitable bearing for the pipe support 12a :at the housing wall. The end of the pipe support 12a is adapted to be positioned in a suitable connecting and levehng means 20 as shown in Figs. 10 and 12. The

-= leveling and connecting means 20 is fixedly attached to A the housing means 14 in a manner to be later described.

After the housing is mounted in the aforesaid up side down position, the electric input wires 13 are suitably attached to an electrical junction box assembly (not shown). The electric control means or ballasts 19 are then fixedly mounted in the housing while the latter is in the aforementioned inverted position and the electrical connections thereto are then made.

The next step in the field assembly is to hingedly attach the unitary reflector means to the housing means to the support 120.

Next the end collar 20b of the leveling means 20 is adjusted relative to a fixed plate 200 and the bolts 20f are tightened to thus provide longitudinal leveling, of the I luminaire.

The lamps 35 may then be installed in the reflector assembly 16. It is apparent that the lamps could also be installed simultaneously with the reflector assembly. The final step in the field assembly is to mount the outside globe assembly 15 upon the housing means 14. The reason for waiting until last on the installation of the lamps and the globe assembly is to reduce the chance of breakage. However, it is to be noted that the globe assembly also can be easily mounted to the housing means 14 prior to the revolving or rotation of the latter if desired.

It will also be noted that all of the mounting of the com ponent parts except for the aforementioned lamps and globes, as well as all of the electrical connections, may be performed while working on top of rather than below the component parts.- This, of course, is important to an installation man who is working 30 feet or so in the air because if any parts should be dropped they would fall into the housing as versus falling clear to the ground. Further, it is always easier to work on top of rather than beneath the work pieces.

Inasmuch as high output fluorescent lamp tubes are by nature greatly elongated, the luminaire tends to become quite bulky. Great care should be taken to keep the over-all luminaire as shallow as possible to reduce wind loading. It should be pointed out that the casing for the luminaire 10 is relatively shallow in vertical height (represented by the dimension B) as compared with the Width of the luminaire (represented by the dimension A). This relationship of height to width is most desirable for reduction in wind resistance. lt is further noted that the outer configuration of the housing and globe assem bly as seen in cross section, Fig. 2, has a somewhat streamlined efiect as to further reduce the wind loading upon the support means 12.

Turning now to a more precise description of the parts. The luminaire 10 in its final assembly, has an outer hollow casing which protects the internal portions from the weather. Broadly, the casing comprises two main parts as aforementioned, the upper housing means 14 and the detachable globe assembly 15. Intermediate these two casing parts is a unitary reflector assembly 16 which substantially divides the interior of the elongated hollow easing into two chambers, the upper internal chamber 17 and the lower internal chamber 18. As is apparent, most of the electrical components and the adjustable connections of the luminaire to the support means are disposed in the upper chamber 17 while the lamps and the reflecting surfaces are disposed in the lower chamber 18.

The upper housing means 14 comprises a housing member 14a which is preferably made from a single piece of aluminum which is formed into a substantially shallow inverted elongated cup shaped roof which is adapted to cover and weather proof the working parts or the luminaire. The perspective view, Fig. 12, shows the housing means 14 approximately out of normal operating position. The housing means 14 is preferredly made relatively thin for good heat dissipation purposes. To strengthen the thin housing, supporting ribs 21, which may be formed of square extruded aluminum, may be spacedly disposed transversely to the long dimension of the housing. The ribs 21 are formed in a manner to fit the inside of the housing as shown.

As shown in Figs. 10 and 12, the left end of the housing means 14 is formed with an aperture, there being a collar 20a surroundingly mounted to the aperture and suitably fixed to the housing. A set screw 20d is positioned on the collar for easy access from the open end of the housing means 14.

Fixedly attached to the left hand rib, as viewed in Fig. 10, is a downwardly projecting (from operating position of luminaire) plate 200 which is formed with a pair of parallel slots 20k and 20p. An end collar 20b is formed with threaded apertures spaced the distance of the slots 20p and 20k. A pair of suitable bolts 20 are disposed in said slots and in said apertures for adjustment of the assignee as the present invention.

" assassin end collar 20b relative to the fixed plate 266 110 "lon'gL tudinallylevel the luminaire. To keep out bugs, moisture, etc. sealing means 20 such" as neoprene, etc., may be disposed in the end collar 2012, the sealing means12lf being suitably pierced to allow the electrical input conductors 13 to extend theretnrough as shown in Fig. 2.

Electric control means 19, known in the artas ballasts, are fixedly disposed Within the upper chamber 17. It is to be noted that the ballasts are preferredly fixedly mounted by suitable fastening'means such as bolts 19a against the inner surface of the member 14a for heat dissipation purposes. The function of the ballasts and the electrical connections thereto from the power source connectors 13 are well known and therefore are not shown and will not be discussed further.

Near the open edges and along the long sides of the interior'of the housing member 14a, area pair of elongated L-shaped strips of .metal 22, one portion of member 22 firmly attached to the housing 14a and the other portion 22a extending inwardly as shown in Figs. 2, l0 and 12. Them-embers 22 are disposed on opposite sides of the housing means such that the inwardly extending portions 22a face each other as best shown in. Fig. 2. Pixedly attached to one of the inwardly extendingp'ortions 22a are a plurality of latch tab members 23 whieh may be suitably and spacedly attached by a screw, bolt or the like as shown on the left hand side of Figs. 2 and 10. The latch means 25 which is mounted upon the tabs 23 will be described later. Substantially opposite from the tab members 23 on the opposite inwardly extending portion 22a, i.e., on the right side as viewed in Fig. 2, are a plurality of spaced hinge tabs 24 which are configured in a manner to receive a detachable hinge member 34 as shall be more thoroughlydeseribed hereafter.

Turning now to the detachable globe assembly and the sealing means therefor, it is to be pointed out that the globe assembly 15 is hingedly mounted in place relative to the housing means '14 by suitable combination latch and hinge means 49. The precise configuration of the latch and hinge means and the sea-ling means surrounding the globe means 15 are more particularly described in. a copending application of Donald W. Harling and Philip '3. Clark, filed the 23rd day of September, 1957, and having Serial No. 685,438 and assigned to the same For purposes of this disclosure, suflice it to say that the globe assembly comprises a one piece elongated cup shape plastic globe member which is detachably hingedly mounted to both sides of the upper luminaire housing 140 such that it may be swung open from either side for aecc'ssto the interior of the luminaire 10 as shown in dotted lines in the far right hand side of Fig. 2.

Once the globe assembly is hingedly orcompletely detached relative to the housing, access is had to the re nflector assembly 16. The reflector assembly 16 is a unitary assembly in that it may be readily attached and detached from the housing member 14a as a separate subassembly as well as hing'edly swung to an open position for access to the upper chamber 17. p The main components of assembly 16 are the lamp holder means 29, elongated fluorescent type lamps 35, quick attachable and detachable electric junction block means 39, parabolic reflecting means 31 and strengthening rib means '32.

Turning now to the separate components, the'parabolic reflector means 31 may be formed out of a singlepiece of aluminum, the bottom surface being highly polished,

and configured such that a pair of spaced back-to-back parabolic reflecting surfaces 31a and 31b areformed to directlight from the light sources disposed at the focal point thereoflaterally outwardly of the lurn'ina'i-re-in opposite preferred directions. The surfaces 31a and31 b areconnected by an intermediate surface 31c all of which will be more particularly described in explanation of 'the deflection diagram.

'31 may be fixed'to and depend from'tran'sverse strengthening ribs 32. Any number of types of fasteningmeans of the ribs '32 to the reflector 31 may be'nsed, one such being screws 33. 'The rib means 32 are generally U- shap'ediin configuration and the side walls of the'left end of the rib as 'viewed in Fig. 3 are preferably formed 'at 3212 with suitable apertures to receive a cotter pin 34 which serves as a hinge. As shown, any number of ribs 32 and hinges 34 may be spaced along the top side of the reflector assembly 16. AH of the cotter pins 34 coact with the rib apertures 32b and with the hinge tabs 24 spaced along the open end of the housing means 14 to serve as aconvenient quick detachable hinge. It is, thus, apparent that the Whole assembly 16 may be rotated on the hinge 24, and if desired, the hinges themselves may be removed so as to take the entire reflector assembly 16 out of the housing 14 so that it may be worked upon on the ground and/or for substitution of a new assembly if that is desired. As aforementioned, the original field installation is exceedingly simple, merely requiring insertion of the hinge 34 in proper places while the housing is in the inverted position shown in Fig. 12.

' The-base portion of the right hand end of the ribs 32 as viewed in Fig. 3 may be formed with a pair of slots which are disposed in right angle relationship to each other. The long slot 32a runs along the long dimension of the ribs32 and the shorter slot 320 is generally transverse to the rib. The slots 32a and 32c are designed to cooperate with the spring loaded manually operable latch means 25 which is attached to latch tab 23.

The latch means 25 is operable to selectively engage and hold the reflector assembly 16 in operative position within the casing when the other end of the ribs 32 are hingedly attached by the cotter pin 34. The latch means 25' comprises a latch member having an enlarged ring type head portion"26, an elongated portion extending throughthe latch tab 23, a suitable coil spring 27 surroundingly mounted to the elongated portion, and a spring retaining collar 28. The head portion of the latch 26 is larger than the rib slot 320 and smaller than slot 32a. The alternative positions of the head portion of the latch means relative to the rib slots 32a and 320 'is shown in dot and dash lines in Fig. 2. -It will be apparent that an operator may pull the latch head portion 26 downwardly as viewed in Fig. 2 to rotate the latter so that it will cooperate with the respective desired slots formed in the rib to alternatively latch or unlatch one side of hinge reflector assembly 16 to the housing means 14.

' means 29a, as shown at the bottom of Fig. 3, has a first upper portion 29f and a depending portion 29c. The portlon 29f extends for attachment to the rib means'32 by the fasteningmeans 33 and the depending portion 290 is adapted to mount lamp receiving bases 29d. In the particular embodiment described, four lamp bases 29d are disclosed in horizontal alignment and mounted on the depending portion 290 of the lamp holder means.

On the other end of the reflector assembly 16 is the lamp holder means 2% having a first mounting portion 29g and a depending portion 2%. The depending portion 29h has corresponding lamp receiving base members 29k mounted in opposed relation to the lamp holders 29d in the usual manner. The lamp holder bases 29k have a spring loaded portion 29k which aid in mounting the lamps 35 in the bases 29k and 29d. It is to be noted that the lamp bases 29d and 29k are positioned below the reflector surfaces 31a, 31c and 31b so that a portion of the reflector surfaces are within one inch of the outer surface of each lamp when the lamps are installed in the bases. This is required for good starting of the fluorescent type tubes 35.

As best shown in'Fig. 3; quick attachable and detach-- ewes The perspective view, Fig. 9, shows a frictional type of quick attachable and detachable type of electrical connection that is preferred and which requires no tools in the making the connection between the male d and female 300 members. The ease of making electrical connections between the ballasts 19 and the lamps is particularly important when it is considered that the man assembling the luminaire in the field is standing considerable distance above the ground on a ladder or the like,

and, hence, the ease of attachment and disattachment be-- comes particularly important both in original installation and repair.

Returning now to the particular configuration of reflector 31 and the relative positional relationship of the 1 lamps 35 relative to the reflector 31 and to each other.

It will be noted that the reflector means 31, as shown in Fig. 4, is so configured as to form opposed back-to-back reflector parabolic surfaces 31a and 31b. Each surface 31a and 31b sends reflected light in a preferred direction as shown by arrows 36 and 37 from lamps 35a and 35d, respectively, disposed at the focal points of the parabolas. The reflected light from surfaces 31a and 31b is, thus refiected outwardly in a lateral direction to throw light generally transversely of the luminaire to light the street.

The parabolic surfaces 31a and 3112 are connected by an intermediate connecting portion 310 which serves as a heat trap and reduces light hot spots below the luminaire. It is to be particularly noted that the connecting area 310 is designed to reflect the light from the sources 35 back into themselves and the other light sources rather than to reflect the light between the light sources and onto the ground. For instance, most of the reflected light from the upper portion of light source 35b will be reflected in a manner so as to tend to impinge back upon itself or either upon the next adjacent light such as 350 or upon light source 35d. For example arrow 44 represents a light ray directed toward the refleeting surface 310 which returns to source 35b, then is directed off in greatly reduced intensity as shown by dotted arrow 40a. The intensity of the light ray 44 is reduced approximately 15 percent each time it impinges upon a reflecting surface. This energy is lost in the form of heat. The same relationship of reflected light is true of the other center light source 350. It also is to be noted that no baffles are interposed between the four lamps 35a to 35-12, inclusive and, hence, a certain amount of direct light is impinging upon the adjacent light sources. As aforementioned, the reason for the configuration of the center interconnecting surface 31c is twofold, one, it eliminates excessive hot spots of light immediately below the luminaire and, also, aids in tending to heat up the lamps for good cold weather operation. While there is a disadvantage to warm weather operation due to this extra heating effect of the reflected light, the disadvantage is more than compensated for by the great increase in efliciency during cold weather operation.

It will be noted that the lamps 3512 through 35d are in horizontal alignment and spaced such that a line from the center of each of the individual sources and tangential to the next adjacent source forms a direct light cutoff plane that is parallel to the preferred directions established by the parabolic surfaces 31:: and 31b, respectively.

More particularly a line drawn from the center of lam 35a tangential to lamp 35b establishes a plane 41 which is substantially parallel to arrow 37 which represents the preferred direction established by reflecting surface 31b. It will be noted that the cutotf planes established by lamps 35b and 350 relative to lamps 35c and 35d, respectively, which form planes 42 and 43 are similar and substantially parallel to the plane established by line 41. Conversely, lamp 35d has a cutoff plane 40 established by lamp 35c which is parallel to the plane represented by lines 36 which are in the preferred direction established by the parabolic reflecting surface 31a. The same holds true for the cutoff planes represented by lines 38 and 39 which are established by lamps 35a and 35b relative to lamps 35b and 350, respectively. It will be apparent that this particular relationship of the lamps to each other and the relationship to the reflector surfaces tend to make a luminaire which gives a very fine light pattern with minimum of glare as shown by the candle power distribution curve diagrams shown in Fig. 5.

More particularly the lateral distribution 46 and vertical distribution 45 are illustrative candle power curves of a 6-foot luminaire, curve 46 being taken at 60 through vertical at an ambient temperature of 24 centigrade in still air with four cool white fluorescent light tubes and curve 45 is a vertical distribution through lateral taken under the same conditions as curve 46.

Figs. 6-8, inclusive, show alternative reflection diagrams and reflector configurations as well as arrangements of lamps to reflector and each other all of which produce substantially the same results as set forth with reflector 31 just described. Similar parts have been marked with similar numbers but have been prefixed with different numbers to differentiate the particular figure involved, i.e., reflecting surface 31a of Fig. 4 is denominated 131a in Fig. 6, 231a in Fig. 7 and 331a in Fig. 8,

and other similar parts are likewise denominated with the same system.

For purposes of clarity the alternative embodiments shown in Figs. 6-8, inclusive will be discussed in comparison to Fig. 1, the differing relationships being explained rather than the parts that have the same relationship. More particularly, Fig. 6 shows a different form of intermediate connecting surface 131c which has both a concave and a convex surface, said intermediate connecting surface 1310 having substantially the same operational relationship to the lamps 135a to 135d, inclusive, as reflector portion 310 of Fig. 4 in that portion 131a will tend to reflect a large portion of the light back toward the various lamp sources in a manner to heat up same and to prevent a deleterious concentration of light immediately below the luminaire.

Fig. 7 shows a reflector configuration wherein the parabolic reflecting surfaces 231a and 231b extend downwardly to the cutoff planes as represented by the arrows, the planes represented by arrows 238 and 241 establishing the furthest downward limit that reflector surface 2310: may extend and the planes established by arrows 240 and 243 establish the furthest downward limit reflector surface 23ib may extend. The intermediate connecting surfaces 2310' and 2310" as shown are generally circular in shape and are designed to trap a good deal of the light in that they reflect the light directly back into the light sources 235b and 2350 for reasons aforestated.

Fig. 8 shows a slightly different configuration from the foregoing in that the lamps 335b and 335c are raised slightly above the horizontal alignment of lamps 335a and 335d. The two outer lamps, namely 335a and 335d, are still disposed at the focal points of the parabolic surfaces 331a and 331b, respectively; however, the cutofl plane between lamps 335b and 335a extends in the preferred direction 336 and the cutoff plane between lamps 335k and 335s relative to each other and 3350 to lamp 335d extends in the same direction as preferred direction 337. One difference in the reflector 331 shown in 9 Fig. 8 is that the cutoff planes established by the two outer lamps relative to the two inner lamps are not in the preferred direction.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that the luminaire hereinbefore described and the alternative embodiments thereof are particularly well adapted for providing good, elficient street lighting while being exceedingly easy to operate and maintain.

Although specific embodiments have been shown and described, it is with full awareness that many modifications thereof are possible. The invention, therefore, is not to be restricted except insofar as is necessitated by the prior art and by the spirit of the appended claims.

What is claimed as the invention is:

1. An elongated longitudinally recessed luminaire for area lighting having an exterior outer casing comprising housing means and globe means cooperable to form an enclosure, a reflector assembly disposed within said enclosure in a manner to divide same into upper and lower chambers, electrical ballast means disposed within said upper chamber, said reflector assembly comprising elongated parabolic reflector means, lamp holder means disposed within said lower chamber and fixedly supported from said reflector means, quick attachable electric terminal means disposed within said upper chamber and fixedly mounted relative to said reflector means and electrically connected to said lamp holder means, strengthening rib means disposed on the upper side of and fixedly mounted transversely to said reflector assembly, hinge means associated with one end of said rib means and with a portion of said housing means, manually operable latch means accessible from the lower side of said reflector means and cooperable with the other end of said rib means and with another portion of said housing means, elongated light source means disposed within said lamp holder means, whereby manual actuation of said latch means affords movement of said entire reflector assembly about said hinge means to provide quick easy access to said ballast means within said upper chamber of said luminaire enclosure and to said terminal means on the upper side of said reflector means.

2. An elongated longitudinally recessed luminaire for area lighting having an exterior outer casing comprising upper housing means and lower light transmitting globe means cooperable to form a luminaire enclosure, a reflector assembly disposed within said enclosure in a manner to divide same into first and second chambers, electrical ballast means fixedly disposed within said first chamber on said upper housing means, said reflector assembly com prising curvilinear elongated metallic reflector means, lamp holder means disposed within said second chamber and fixedly supported from said reflector means, quick attachable electric terminal block means disposed on said reflector assembly and one side thereof being electrically connected to said ballast means in said first chamber and the other side being electrically connected to said lamp holder means, a plurality of rigid strengthening rib elemerits separately disposed on the upper side of and fixedly mounted transversely to said reflector assembly, hinge means associated with one end of each of said rib elements and with a portion of said upper housing means adjacent thereto, manually operable latch means accessible from the lower side of said reflector means and co operable with the other end of said rib elements and with another portion of said housing means adjacent said other end of said rib elements, and elongated light source means disposed within said lamp holder means, whereby manual actuation of said latch means aifords movement of said entire reflector assembly about said hinge means on said rib elements to provide quick easy access to said ballast means disposed on said upper housing within said first chamber of said luminaire enclosure without removal of said lamp means from said lamp holder means.

3. A longitudinally recessed luminaire for area lighting having an exterior casing comprising housing means and translucent globe means co-operable to form a luminaire enclosure, a reflector assembly disposed within said luminaire enclosure in a manner to normally divide same into first and second chambers, said reflector assembly com prising reflector means, lamp holder means fixedly mounted relative to said reflector means, electrical control means fixedly disposed in said first chamber, quick attachable electric terminal means fixedly mounted relative to said reflector means and electrically connected to said lamp holder means and to said electrical control means, strengthening means for said reflector assembly, hinge means associated with said strengthening means and connecting said reflector assembly with a portion of said housing means, manually operable latch means also associated with said strengthening means and cooperable with another portion of said housing means, light source means disposed within said lamp holder means for cooperation with said reflector means whereby manual actuation of said latch means affords a pivotal swinging movement of said entire reflector assembly as a unit about said hinge means to provide quick easy access to said first chamber of said luminaire enclosure.

4. An elongated longitudinally recessed luminaire for area lighting having an exterior casing comprising housing means and translucent globe means co-operable to form a luminaire enclosure, a reflector assembly disposed within said luminaire enclosure in a manner to normally divide same into upper and lower chambers and having an open and closed position, said reflector assembly comprising elongated reflector means, lamp holder means fixedly mounted relative to said reflector means, electrical control means fixedly disposed in said upper chamber, quick attachable electric teminal block means fixedly mounted relative to said reflector means and electrically connected to said lamp holder means and to said electrical control means when said reflector assembly is in both its open and closed positions, strengthening means for said reflector assembly, hinge means associated with said strengthening means and connecting said reflector assembly with a portion of said housing means, manually operable latch means also associated with said strengthening means and cooperable with another portion of said housing means, elongated light source means disposed within said lamp holder means for cooperation with said reflector means whereby manual actuation of said latch means affords a pivotal swinging movement of said entire reflector assembly as a unit about said hinge means to provide quick easy access to said upper chamber of said luminaire enclosure while not breaking the electrical connection be tween said electric control. means and said lamp holder means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,327,552 Poehling Aug. 24, 1943 2,432,392 De Merritt Dec. 9, 1947 2,447,228 Boston Aug. 17, 1948 2,489,076 Bjontegard Nov. 22, 1949 2,606,998 Winkler et al Aug. 12, 1952 2,615,123 Guth Oct. 21, 1952 2,640,148 McCandless May 26, 1953 2,678,380 Westby May 11, 1954 2,731,227 Anderson Jan. 17, 1956 2,758,199 Yonkers Aug. 7, 1956 2,833,916 Foulds May 6, 1958 2,837,631 Lenze et al. June 3, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 670,709 Great Britain Apr. 23, 1952

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3064124 *Feb 4, 1959Nov 13, 1962Westinghouse Electric CorpFluorescent luminaire
US3065333 *Mar 13, 1961Nov 20, 1962SpauldingFluorescent lighting fixture
US3086106 *Aug 22, 1960Apr 16, 1963Marcellus Andrews AlvadoreLantern
US3093321 *Jun 16, 1961Jun 11, 1963Christy Howard LOutdoor fluorescent light holder
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US3109599 *Feb 4, 1960Nov 5, 1963Holophane Co IncLuminaire
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US3326112 *Jul 26, 1965Jun 20, 1967Westinghouse Electric CorpAir conditioning and lighting system
US7329026 *Nov 13, 2006Feb 12, 2008Jeffery John HaymanLighting fixture with smooth adjustable beam width
US7703939 *Feb 21, 2007Apr 27, 2010Ruud Lighting, Inc.Light fixture support assembly
US9157620Oct 12, 2012Oct 13, 2015Thorn Lighting Ltd.Mounting arrangement and method for mounting an optical member to an oblong luminaire
US20080198609 *Feb 21, 2007Aug 21, 2008Wilcox Kurt SLight Fixture Support Assembly
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EP2581652A1 *Oct 12, 2011Apr 17, 2013Thorn Lighting LimitedMounting arrangement
WO2013053875A2 *Oct 12, 2012Apr 18, 2013Thorn Lighting Ltd.Mounting arrangement
WO2013053875A3 *Oct 12, 2012Jun 20, 2013Thorn Lighting Ltd.Mounting arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/223, 248/219.1
International ClassificationF21S8/08
Cooperative ClassificationF21V21/116, F21S8/086, F21Y2103/00, F21V17/20
European ClassificationF21V17/20, F21V21/116, F21S8/08H2