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Publication numberUS2886919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1959
Filing dateAug 18, 1955
Priority dateAug 18, 1955
Publication numberUS 2886919 A, US 2886919A, US-A-2886919, US2886919 A, US2886919A
InventorsGlass Marvin I, Pearson Jr Charles
Original AssigneeGlass Marvin I, Pearson Jr Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy device which simulates the actions of a radarscope
US 2886919 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1959 M. GLASS ET AL TOY DEVICE WHICH SIMULATES THE ACTIONS OF A RADARSCOPE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 18, 1955 y 1959 M. l. GLASS ET AL 2,886,919

TOY DEVICE WHICH SIMULATES THE ACTIONS OF A RADARSCOPE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Li W Filed Aug. 18, 1955 I. GLASS ET AL HIGH SIMULATES THE ACTIONS OF A RADARSCOPE May 19, 1959 M. TOY DEVICE W 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 18, 1955 I VENTORS. flrfi yzazwa ay/J45 2407150 1 74 w OP- *2 l. GLASS ET AL M. TOY DEVICE WHI May 19, 1959 2,886,919

' 7 CH SIMULATES THE ACTIONS OF A RADARSCOPE 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 18, 1955 l. GLASS ET AL M. TOY DEVICE WHICH SIMULATES THE ACTIONS May 19, 1959 OF A RADARSCOPE Filed Aug. 18, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 ZZ(J( MEMO Kl United States Patent 2,886,919 Patented May 19, 1959 TOY DEVICE WHICH SIMULATES THE ACTIONS UP A RADARSCUPE Marvin I. Glass and Charles Pearson, Jiu, Chicago, llll.

Application August 18, 1955, Serial No. 529,115

4 Claims. (Cl. 46-427) This invention relates to a toy device which simulates the actions of a radarscope.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a toy which simulates the actions of radar instruments in detecting planes in flight and projecting them on a screen for viewing,

Another object of this invention is to provide a toy device of the foregoing character which has means for signaling or indicating whether a plane viewed on the screen belongs either to the United States or a friendly country or to that of an enemy country.

The toy includes a frosted viewing screen on which a series of planes of various types and of different countries are projected individually and successively in silhouette form as though they were picked up by radar instruments in flight and projected on a screen, which planes move across the screen as though in flight. It also includes means for selecting any of the planes and viewing same individually and by indicating means determining whether said selected plane viewed is either an American or friendly nation type or an enemy type.

Another object of this invention is to provide a compact toy device of the foregoing character which provides great play value as well as educational value.

Other objects will become apparent as this description progresses.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a front perspective view of the toy.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary rear perspective view showing the lighting case.

Fig. 3 is a front elevational view.

Fig. 4 is a vertical section taken on lines 44 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a view taken on lines 5-5 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a view taken on lines 66 of Fig. 5, and

Fig. 7 is a schematic view of the wiring diagram.

The housing or casing is generally indicated at 10 and is made preferably of plastic material. The right side of the unit or the scanning portion will be first described.

The front panel of the housing has an enlarged square shaped front opening 11 within which is secured a ground glass frosted screen 12 which is designated as the viewing screen.

Suitably journalled as at 13 and 14 in the front and rear walls of the housing is a shaft 15 which has fixedly secured thereto a scanning plate or disc 16 made of clear plastic material which has peripheral teeth 17. Suitably impressed or formed circumferentially around the scanning plate 16, as best shown in Fig. 6 are representations of various types of planes generally designated by the numeral 18, which planes are in silhouette form and are adapted to be projected on the viewing screen 12 as said scanning disc is rotated, as will be subsequently described. As shown, there will be about eighteen different types or styles of planes. They may be pictures of the planes or engravings of same impressed on the scanning plate.

Suitably journalled as at 19 and .20 in the front and rear walls of the housing is a shaft 21 which has fixedly secured thereto a pinion 22 in engagement with the teeth 17 of the scanning disc 16. Also fixedly mounted on the shaft 21 forwardly of the pinion is a gear 24 which is in engagement with a worm 26 on the drive shaft 28 which is driven by a small electric motor 30 which in turn is suspended and supported from the top of the housing.

Fixed on the shaft 21 adjacent the front thereof is a gear 32 which is in engagement with teeth 34 of a clear plastic disc 36 to rotate same. The disc 36 is rotatably mounted as at 38 on a clear plastic panel 4i) positioned rearwardly of the viewing screen 12. The plastic panel 40 is suitably secured to the front of the housing.

The clear plastic disc 36 has milled thereon a pointer or bar 42. Thus as the scanning disc 16 is rotated, the disc 36 and pointer 42 is rotated but the pointer rotates at twice the speed of the scanning disc 16 due to the difference in gear arrangement.

The rear wall of the housing is provided with an enlarged opening 41 which through a collar 42 supports a condensing lens 44 rearwardly of the scanning disc 16. A housing generally designated by the numeral 46 is detachably secured as by spring fingers 47 to suitable openiugs 48 in the rear wall of the housing. The housing 46 supports a socket 49 which supports a small electric bulb 5t! which is positioned in axial alinetnent with the condensing lens 44.

Suspended from the top of the housing is an arm 52 which supports a magnifying lens 54 forwardly of the scanning disc 16 in axial alinement with the condensing lens 44.

Supported on the top of the housing is a hollow stem 56 within which is rotatably supported a spindle 5a which extends through an opening in the top of the housing and which supports a gear 60 at the lower end thereof which is in engagement with a worm gear 62 fixed on the shaft 21 to rotate the spindle 58. The upper end of the spindle supports a simulated radar antenna 64.

When the motor 30 is operating it will through the worm gear 26 rotate gear 24 to rotate the shaft 21 which rotates pinion 22 to rotate the scanning disc 16. As the scanning disc 16 rotates, the planes 18 on said disc will be moved into alinement with the condensing lens dd and magnifying lens 54. The light rays from the bulb 50 will be intensified and concentrated by the condensing lens and will be projected through the scanning disc and through the magnifying lens 54 which enlarges the image of each of the planes 18 and projects it through the plastic disc 36 and plastic panel 40 and on the frosted viewing screen 12 where it is visible from the front. The silhouetted image of the plane on the viewing screen 12 is approximately one and one-half times the size of the silhouette figure on the scanning disc 16. As the scanning disc rotates a different plane is constantly projected on the viewing screen and each plane moves across the screen as though in flight.

As the shaft 21 rotates it will through gear 32 drive the clear plastic disc 36 which has a pointer finger 42 which rotates at a faster rate of speed than the appearance of the successive planes on the scanning disc. As the pointer 42 rotates it likewise is projected on the viewing screen 32. Thus the pointer is sweeping around as the individual planes are projected on the viewing screen.

Simultaneously as the shaft 21 is rotating, the worm gear 62 thereon will through gear 60 rotate the spindle to rotate the simulated radar antenna 64 giving the impression that the antenna is picking up planes in the sky and projecting same on the viewing screen 12.

The housing 1 3 to the left of that described supports a manually rotatable clear plastic disc 66 substantially of the same size as scanning disc 16 and disc 66 has a series of planes 18a imprinted or impressed thereon in silhouette form as the planes on the scanning disc 12 and in the same order. The disc 66 is fixed to a shaft 68 which is suitably journalled in the front wall of the housing. The shaft 68 extends through the front wall or panel and has secured thereto a knob 71 for manually rotating the disc 66. The front panel of the housing has a square shaped opening 72 of a size through which one plane 18a at a time may be viewed.

The disc 66 is provided with an outer series of spaced openings 74 and an inner series of spaced openings 76. There is an opening either of the outer series or inner series for each of the planes 18a and said openings are radially alined with said planes. The outer series of openings 74 are used to designate friendly planes and the inner series of openings 76 are used to designate enemy or foe planes. Thus for example the opening 74a which is in radial alinement with the plane 13b will he a friendly plane, which plane will be a representation of an American make, and the planes in radial alinernent with the inner series of openings such as plane 180 in alinernent with opening 760 will depict planes of a foreign enemy country.

The front panel of the housing is provided with two small vertically alined openings and within the top opening is mounted a green colored plastic translucent disc 78 and within the bottom opening is mounted a red colored plastic translucent disc 79. Said discs are designated as friend and foe signal lights respectively. The outer series of openings 74 on the disc 66 are circumferentially spaced to be in alinernent with upper disc signal 78 and the inner circumferentially spaced openings 76 will be in alinernent with the lower disc signal 79. A light bulb Sill is secured in the housing rearwardly of the manually rotatable disc 66. When the disc 66 has been rotated manually by the knob to bring one of the planes in registry with the panel opening 72 for viewing, one of either of the series of openings 74 or 76 will be in alinernent with either of the disc signals 73 or 79. When the bulb Si) is lit, as will be subsequently described, the light therefrom will pass through the opening in alinernent with one of the disc signals and said signal will light up, thus when any of the outer series of openings 74 are in alinernent with the disc 78, the light from the bulb will pass through the opening in the disc and the green disc 78 will glow. When any of the inner series of openings 76 are brought in alinernent with the lower opening 79, the light will pass through so that the red disc glows, thus instantly indicating whether the plane in view in opening 72 is a friendly or enemy plane.

The educational and play value of the toy will be readily apparent. As the child sees the planes 18 move across the viewing screen 12 he concentrates on any plane he sees to determine whether it is an American or friendly plane or an enemy plane. To determine this he rotates the knob 70 to bring into view through the panel opening 72 the identical plane 18a on the disc 66. When this is done the child will depress the key which closes the circuit to illuminate the bulb 80, thus either one of the signal discs 78 or 79 will be illuminated to signal which type of plane has been sighted.

The top of the housing has an opening which s-lideably receives a vertical rod 82 simulating an antenna rod. Mounted inside the housing is a. right angled bracket 83 having an opening to slideably receive the rod. A manually rotatable member 84 transversely positioned on said bracket makes frictional contact with said rod and said member extends through an opening in the front panel of the housing and has a knob 85 for rotating same. By rotating the knob 85 the rod 82 is raised or lowered. A dummy horn 86 is secured on the top of the housing. A buzzer is operated however as will be subsequently described.

The lower front or apron of the housing, as best seen in Fig. 1, is provided with four slots 88. Within each slot is a manually operated lever or key for the purpose of closing the circuit to' operate the various parts. Each of these levers is pivotally mounted (Fig. 5) so that it can be depressed in the slot to close the circuit. Each key except the key for operating the bulb 50 is spring biased so that it will return to its elevated position when released. The key for operating the bulb :31) however must be elevated manually for the reason hereinafter explained.

As best shown in Fig. 1 and the circuit diagram of Fig. 7, there are four levers or keys identified as follows; numeral 90 identifies the key for closing the circuit to operate the buzzer; numeral 92 identifies the key for closing the circuit to the bulb 80 which illuminates either the friend or foe indicator; numeral 94 identifies the key for closing the circuit to operate the motor 30, which key when depressed operates the motor to turn the scanning disc 16 so that the planes may be projected on the viewing screen 12, also the radar antenna 64 is simultaneously rotated. While the scanning disc 16 is being rotated the planes would not be visible on the viewing screen 12 until the light bulb 50 behind the scanning disc is illuminated. For closing the circuit to the light bulb 50 the key 96 is depressed and the light rays will project the planes on the viewing screen 12. Also supported adjacent the front panel is a telegraph key 98.

The wiring diagram illustrated in Fig. 7 will now be described. Supported within the housing are three dry cell batteries, A, B and C and arranged as shown in Fig. 7.

To operate the motor 30, the key 94 is depressed closing the switch 103. The current will flow through line 100 connected to the positive pole of the battery A, through line 102, through switch 103, line 104, to the motor 30 and line 166 to the negative pole of battery A. The operation of the motor will operate the parts as previously described to operate the scanning disc 16, the radar antenna and the disc 36 carrying the pointer 42. For the purpose of viewing the planes on the viewing screen 12 the light bulb 50 is illuminated.

With the plug D in the socket E and the key 96 in its elevated position, the light 50 will not be illuminated as the contacts of switch 122 will be separated by an insulator 122a. By depressing the key 96 the insulator 122a will be moved so that the contacts of switch 122 engage each other to close the circuit to the light 50. The key 96 will remain depressed until it is manually raised to its elevated position thus again separating the contacts of switch 122 and breaking the circuit. With the key 96 depressed the current will flow from the positive pole of battery C, through lines 111, 112, 117, socket E, finger 118 of plug D, line 119 to bulb 50, through line 119a, finger 120, socket E, line 121, switch 122, lines 123, 124, 125 and 109 to the negative side of battery B, through conductor to the negative side of battery C.

To illuminate the friend or foe indicators 78 and 79 respectively, the light bulb 80 must be energized. The light bulb is supported in the housing behind disc 66 in alinernent with said indicators. To illuminate the light bulb 80 the key 92 is depressed closing switch 114. The current will flow from the positive side of battery C, lines 111, 112, 117, 113, through switch 114, lines 115, 151), 107 to the bulb 80, line 109 to the negative side of battery B, through conductor 110 connected to the positive side of said battery to the negative pole of battery C.

To operate the alarm sound the alarm key 90 is depressed closing the switch 131. The current will then flow from the negative pole of battery B through lines 109, 125, 124, through switch 131 to lines 130, 129 to contact 132 through vibrator 134, through conductor 128 to winding 127, line 126 to socket E, lines 117, 112, 111 to the positive pole of battery C, through conductor 110 to positive pole of battery B. When vibrator 134 operates a buzzing sound is produced.

The telegraph key 98 is operated by depressing same closing switch 136. Current then flows from the negative pole of battery B through line 109, through switch 136, lines 138, 140, 142 and 144 to conductor 128 to winding 127 to line 126 to socket E, lines 117, 112, 111 to the positive pole of battery Cthrough connector 110 to the positive pole of battery B.

It will be understood that various changes and modifications may be made from the foregoing without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a device of the character described, a viewing screen, a scanning disc having a plurality of planes in silhouette form annularly arranged thereon, a light source positioned rearwardly of said scanning disc and adapted to project the silhouette planes on said viewing screen successively as said scanning disc is rotating, a sweep arm positioned rearwardly of said viewing screen and rotated simultaneously with said scanning disc and visible on said screen, said sweep arm being rotated at a faster rate of speed than the successive appearances of said planes on said viewing screen, a simulated radar antenna, and means for simultaneously rotating said simulated radar antenna as said scanning disc is rotating.

2. In a device of the character described, a viewing screen, a rotatable disc having a plurality of representations of various planes circumferentially positioned on said rotatable disc, means for projecting said planes on said viewing screen with each plane being projected individually and successively as said rotatable disc rotates, a rotatable sweeping arm adapted to be projected on said viewing screen and means for rotating said sweeping arm faster than the appearance of said planes on said viewing screen.

3. In a toy device of the character described, a viewing screen, a scanning disc having a plurality of planes annularly arranged thereon, a light source positioned rearwardly of said scanning disc and adapted to project the planes on said viewing screen successively as said scanning disc is rotating, a sweep arm positioned rearwardly of said viewing screen and rotated simultaneously with said scanning disc and visible on said screen, said sweep arm being rotated .at a faster rate of speed than the successive appearance of said planes on said viewing screen.

4. In a toy device of the character described, a viewing screen, a scanning disc having a plurality of planes annularly arranged thereon, a light source positioned rearwardly of said scanning disc and adapted to project the planes on said viewing screen successively as said scanning disc is rotating, a transparent disc positioned rearwardly of said viewing screen, said transparent disc having a sweep arm thereon, said transparent disc being rotated simultaneously with said scanning disc and said sweep arm being visible on said screen, said sweep arm rotating at a faster rate of speed than the successive appearance of said planes on said viewing screen.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,661,757 Jones Mar. 6, 1928 1,686,615 Balnojan Oct. 9, 1928 1,698,013 Zeng Jan. 8, 1929 1,887,708 Cameron Nov. 15, 1932 2,500,899 Leahan Mar. 14, 1950 2,507,215 Miltenberg May 9, 1950 2,545,381 Prentice Mar. 13, 1951 2,584,421 Brenchley Feb. 5, 1952 2,766,552 Odenkirchen Oct. 16, 1956

Patent Citations
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US1661757 *Dec 19, 1924Mar 6, 1928Eastman Kodak CoMobile color projector
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US1698013 *Sep 13, 1924Jan 8, 1929Zeng Standard Company DeProjection device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3012368 *Jan 15, 1959Dec 12, 1961Friedman SolSpaceship navigation game apparatus
US3251599 *Mar 9, 1964May 17, 1966Louis MarkelToy with light ray projector simulating tracking of satellites
US4285158 *Jul 30, 1979Aug 25, 1981Randall L. CourtsToy for detecting magnetic fields with electrical compass contacts
US4338742 *Jul 23, 1981Jul 13, 1982Outtrim John EArmadillo toy
US5057051 *Nov 29, 1990Oct 15, 1991Babicz Amy HNight light toy apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/242, 353/11, 359/441, 446/485, 359/798
International ClassificationA63H33/30
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/3027
European ClassificationA63H33/30F