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Publication numberUS2887005 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1959
Filing dateJul 24, 1957
Priority dateJul 24, 1957
Publication numberUS 2887005 A, US 2887005A, US-A-2887005, US2887005 A, US2887005A
InventorsRobert Fromm
Original AssigneeW & R Fromm Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elastic boot lace
US 2887005 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. FROMM 2,887,005 ELASTIC BOOT LACE Filed July 24, 1957 r INVENTOR. Y ROBERT FROMM B The present invention relates to' an 2,887,005 ELAsnc noor LACE Robert Fromm, Plandome, N.Y., assignor to W & R

FrommCorporation, Glen Cove,,N.Y., a corporation of New York a Application July 24, 1951, Serial No. 673,820 3 Claims. C1. s7 1 v elastic lace especially adaptedfor use on ski boots.

It is of paramount importance that a skiers boot be securely and snugly fitted so as to avoid any play or slip of the foot within the boot. In this way the boot acts as one with the foot in the control of the skis. An important factor in achieving suc fitting is the boot lacing fortably fasten the boot onto the skiers foot, (2) that it will not loosen or unfasten in use, (3) that it is easily applied, (4) that it is strong and durable, and (5) that it will not suddenly break while in use.

In a constant attempt to improve the fitting of a ski boot many lacing arrangements have been tried with varying degrees of success. One such arrangement employs a number of hooks arranged longitudinally along the flaps of the ski boot. An elastic material in its stretched condition is then laced about the hooks. contraction of the elastic lace fastens the boot securely about the skiers foot.

This lacing arrangement was initially received with great enthusiasm by the skiing fraternity because it admirably complied with the first three of the abovelisted criteria. It soon became apparent, however, that the elastic boot laces heretofore employed were seriously deficient in complying with the latter two criteria. Thus the boot laces required frequent replacement due to their lack of strength and durability. In addition, and of more serious concern, they were subject to sudden breakage due to the extreme strains applied thereto. Such breakage was extremely dangerous if it occurred while the skier was in motion. For these reasons the use of this otherwise highly desirable lacing arrangement has faded into relative obsolescence.

Accordingly, it is the primary object of the present invention to provide an elastic boot lace which complies with all five of the above-stated criteria, and which in particular is extremely strong and durable, and without danger of sudden breakage while in use.

To this end the elastic boot lace of the invention is provided with a core comprising a multiplicity of longitudinally arranged elastic strands. This core is enveloped by a longitudinally extensible braided textile sheath preferably woven from nylon and cellulosic fibers. The boot lace thus formed is then impregnated with an elastomer which is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural and synthetic rubber. In effecting such impregnation the boot lace is preferably dipped within a latex of the elastomer while under tension. Thus the elastomer will impregnate all of the interstices of the braid. The impregnated boot lace is then heated at a temperature value and for a time duration selected to cure the elastomer employed.

The invention can be best understood by referring to the following drawings in which:

Fig. l is a diagram of a ski boot lacing arrangement employing an elastic boot lace;

with an elastomer; and

Fig. 2 is a cut-away diagram of an elastic boot lace in accordance withthe invention prior to its impregnation with an elastomer;

Fig. 3 is a cut-away diagram of an elastic boot lace in accordance with the invention after its impregnation F1g. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4 4 of Fig. 3. Fig. 1 illustrates the way in which an elastic boot lace 1 is employed to fasten a ski boot 2. The flaps of the boot arejprovided with a number of longitudinally arsecurely about the skierfs foot. I

Thei im'proved bootl'a'ce of the invention 'prior to impregnation with an elastomer is illustrated in Fig. 2. The lace basically comprises an inner core shown generally at 10 and an enveloping sheath shown generally at 11. The inner core 10 is made of a multiplicity of longitudinally arranged elastic strands 12. These strands are preferably of natural or synthetic rubber. However, any synthetic material having the resiliency and elasticity of rubber may be employed. It has been found that the use of approximately fifty-five such elastic strands, each having a diameter of approximately twenty thousandths of an inch, provides an extremely strong core with the proper overall diameter for the lacing application.

The braided textile sheath 11 may be fabricated on standard braiding machines. The braiding makes the sheath longitudinally extensible so that it may be stretched along with the elastic strands when applied to the hooks of the ski boot. Preferably the braided sheath is made of interwoven strands of nylon 13 and cellulosic fibers 14. The cellulosic fiber, commonly cotton, is used because of its adhesive properties. Nylon is employed and resistance to chafing. Nylon is herein defined as a high molecular weight polyamide. Various nylons can be employed including nylon 66 which is prepared from the polymerization of adipic acid and hexamethylenediamine, or nylon 6 which is prepared from the polymerization of epsilon caprolactan.

As illustrated in Figs. 3 and impregnated with an elastomer 20 selected from the group consisting of natural and synthetic rubber. The elastomer acts to hold the lace together as one unit and to prevent slippage of the lace past the hooks of the boot. In effecting such impregnation the boot lace is preferably stretched under longitudinal tension and then dipped into a latex of the elastomer. In this way the latex fully impregnates the interstices of the braided sheath to provide a continuous elastomer surface. The impregnated lace is then heated for .a length of time and under an appropriate temperature to cure the elastomer employed.

The improved boot lace of the invention has proved to be far stronger and durable than the elastic laces heretofore employed. In addition, breakage in the improved boot lace, even under conditions of great stress, is a gradual process thereby giving the skier warning of the need for replacement. Thus, by means of the present invention the highly advantageous elastic boot lacing arrangement is made practical for skiers due to its compliance with all five of the above-listed criteria.

A preferred embodiment of the invention has been described. Various changes and modifications may be made in the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The method of producing an elastic boot lace which comprises assembling a multiplicity of elastic strands in 4 the boot lace is then a longitudinal arrangement, enveloping said multiplicity of elastic strands with a longitudinally extensible braided textile sheath to form a lace, impregnating the said lace while under longitudinal tension with the latex of an elastomer selected from the group consisting of natural and synthetic rubber, and heating the impregnated lace at a temperature value and for a time duration selected to cure the said elastomer.

2. The method of producing an elastic boot lace which comprises assembling a multiplicity of elastic strands in a longitudinal arrangement, eneveloping said multiplicity of elastic strands with a longitudinally extensible braided textile sheath woven from nylon and cellulosic fibers to form a lace, impregnating the said lace while under longitudinal tension with the latex of an elastomer selected from the group consisting of natural and synthetic rubber, and heating the impregnated lace at a temperature value and for a time duration selected to cure the said elastomer.

3. An elastic boot lace comprising approximately fifty- 4 five longitudinally arranged elastic strands, each having a diameter of approximately twenty-thousandths of an inch, and a longitudinal extensible braided textile sheath woven from nylon and cellulosic fibers enveloping said elongated elastic strands, said boot lace being impregnated with an elastomer selected from the group consisting of natural and synthetic rubber.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 54,167 Hull Apr. 24, 1866 1,726,099 Chisholm Aug. 27, 1929 2,089,379 Johnson Aug. 10, 1937 2,091,999 Madge et al. Sept. 7, 1937 2,422,440 Severance June 17, 1947 2,824,485 Gregory Feb. 25, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 674,383 Great Britain June 25, 1 952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US54167 *Apr 24, 1866 Improved elastic webbing
US1726099 *Jul 1, 1927Aug 27, 1929Everlastik IncMethod for making covered elastic strands
US2089379 *May 15, 1936Aug 10, 1937Johnson William CElastic cord covering
US2091999 *Mar 7, 1936Sep 7, 1937Us Rubber Prod IncRacket string
US2422440 *Apr 19, 1945Jun 17, 1947Stanley SwitlikParachute and elastic suspension line
US2824485 *Nov 20, 1953Feb 25, 1958Gregory Francis JTennis string or like article
GB674383A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2992584 *Oct 10, 1958Jul 18, 1961Pepperell Braiding Company IncTie cord
US4754685 *May 12, 1986Jul 5, 1988Raychem CorporationAbrasion resistant braided sleeve
US5263831 *Feb 19, 1992Nov 23, 1993Cobe Laboratories, Inc.Peristaltic pump
US6283004 *Jan 12, 2001Sep 4, 2001Taiwan Paiho LimitedShoelace
US6796008 *Feb 10, 2003Sep 28, 2004Kae Sheng Webbing Co., Ltd.Reflectorized lace and the like
US7361185 *Jul 9, 2002Apr 22, 2008Canica Design, Inc.Clinical and surgical system and method for moving and stretching plastic tissue
US7429265 *May 9, 2001Sep 30, 2008Canica Design Inc.System and method for moving and stretching plastic tissue
US7827895 *Nov 14, 2008Nov 9, 2010Wen-Ching WangSafety elastic rope
US8105215 *Oct 21, 2009Jan 31, 2012Wen-Ching WangPull cord assembly for body stretching exercise
US8518077Aug 25, 2008Aug 27, 2013Canica Design Inc.System and method for moving and stretching plastic tissue
US8663275Feb 29, 2008Mar 4, 2014Canica Design Inc.Clinical and surgical system and method for moving and stretching plastic tissue
US20120144631 *Dec 7, 2011Jun 14, 2012Converse Inc.Multiple Material Tying Lace
WO2012078984A1 *Dec 9, 2011Jun 14, 2012Converse Inc.Multiple material tying lace
Classifications
U.S. Classification87/1, 87/6, 87/2
International ClassificationA43C1/02, A43C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C1/02
European ClassificationA43C1/02