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Publication numberUS2887243 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1959
Filing dateAug 19, 1957
Priority dateAug 19, 1957
Publication numberUS 2887243 A, US 2887243A, US-A-2887243, US2887243 A, US2887243A
InventorsMurdock Sr Forrest L
Original AssigneeMurdock Sr Forrest L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescoping tank
US 2887243 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 19 1959 F. L. MuRDocK, sR 2,887,243

TELESCOPING TANK Filed Auz. 19, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENToR., For/*ea* 4. Maf/06, 5f:

TELESCOPIN G TANK Forrest L. Murdock, Sr., Tulsa, Okla.

Application August 19, 1957, Serial No. 678,833

2 Claims. (Cl. 220-8) `This invention relates to portable receptacle construction and more particularly, to a collapsible fluid-receiving tank which may be readily transported in its collapsed condition and then erected in an upright position ready for immediate use in a short period of time.

The collapsible tank herein presented is especially adapted for use by oil well cleaning and reconditioning contractors wherein it is necessary that they have available a large capacity liquid tank and which may be collapsed and transported from well to well in a minimum of time and at a relatively small cost.

As the producing life of a flowing or pumping well is extended, the rate of production will be reduced at a rate commensurate with reduction of reservoir pressure and gas depletion, the amount of caving that has occurred, the restriction of sand drainage which is caused by deposition of paraffin and other residues on the surfaces of the well pores, and the proximity of salt water. Many of these factors can be overcome and remedied by cleaning and reconditioning of the well and there are many companies now engaged in the full-time occupation of cleaning and reconditioning clogged and` similarly constricted wells which have ceased to flow or cannot be pumped at an adequate rate.

The precipitation of mineral salts from oil eld water and the deposition of mud, silt, waxy and asphalt materials cause st production in the oil well and it is frequently necessary to remove parain from the well so that it may be brought back into normal production. The term paratiin as commonly applied Yby field men and oil well operators includes mud, silt, sand, asphalt and some water and mineral matter in addition to natural paralin wax. e

Many types of cleaning and reconditioning operations have been suggested and such processes includetblo`wing the well with dynamite and nitrog'lycerine,` as well as mechanical reconditioning including hailing, sand-pumping, re-drilling, and reaming, but in many instances these processes are completely unsatisfactory and it is wmore desirable to utilize methods wherein solvents or other iluids are directed into the well casing so as to loosen, dissolve, or otherwise remove the deposits from the well which are preventing normal flow and which preclude pumping of the oil from the well. t t

Various liquid methods of cleaning and reconditioning oil wells are known and utilized including introduction of solvents such as hot oil, kerosene, gasoline or a mixture of gas-oil and benzine into the well in order to dissolve the paraiiinic substances, the introduction of steam or hot water into the well casing under pressure, circulating hot oil or water through the well, as well` as the introduction of certain acids into the well between the casing and the tubing. Other methods of a similar nature which are utilized, include the introduction of heat-producing chemicals such as sodium hydroxide, Icalciumcarbide and water, and aqueousaluminnm `compositions into the well.

Manifestly, these methods just referredto involving` the utilizationV of liquids, require that the lreconditioning con- United States Patent O 2,887,243 Patented May 19, 1959 2 tractors have available relatively large liquid-receiving tanks wherein the materials may be stored for ready use at the exact moment needed. Such large tanks are frequently not available at the well site and it, therefore, becomes necessary for the contractor to transport such tanks with his equipment. This involves a considerable number of additional vehicles, as well as a number of men which are needed to erect and disassemble sectional tank assemblies. Although the operators could transport onepiece tanks of considerable volume, this has been found substantially impractical because of the fact that it is usually desirable to mount the tanks upon a tractortrailer and this necessarily limits the over-al1 height of the tanks which are disposed upon the trucks because of obstructions encountered such as bridges or the like.

It is, therefore, the most important object of this invention to provide a portable tank which is constructed of a plurality of normally upright, tubular sections disposed in telescoped relationship and which are adapted to be moved to extended positions so as to present an elongated, collapsible fluid-receiving tank.

It is a further important object of this: invention to provide a portable tank of the type described which includes structure for moving the telescoped. sections into their extended positions under the influence `of fluid pressure so that the tank may be erected in a very short period of time.

Another importantobject of the invention relates to the provision of a collapsible tank as referred to wherein the telescoped sections are movable to and from extended positions with `proximal adjacent ends thereof disposed in partial overlapping relationship and wherein there is provided sealing means between the overlapped portions of the sections so as to prevent loss of duid. between the ends when the tank is iilled with liquid or the like.

Another important object relates to the provision of interengageable means 0n the partially overlapped portions of the sections which operate to limit the extent of movement of the telescoped sections with respect to each other and which also receive the sealing means therebetween so as to prevent loss of liquid from the tank.

Other important objects of the invention relate to structure for moving the telescoped sections into their extended positions and whichis located externally of the tank so that if desired, the structure may be utilized to move the sections of a plurality of tanks into their extended positions; to the provision of a slightly modified tank which includes iioat elements thereon so that `the telescoped s ectlons are automatically moved into their extended posit1ons as the tank is filled with liquid; and to the provision of` a `exible, imperforate liner within another modified form of the tank which falls down into the outermost section of the tank as the inner telescoped. sections are moved downwardly into the outer section.

In the drawings:

Fig. `1` is a central, vertical, cross-sectional view of a collapsible, portable tank made in accordance with one form of the instant invention, certain parts being broken away to illustrate details of construction.

Fig. 2 is a plan View of the tank illustrated in Fig. l;

. Fig. 3 isa side elevational view of the tank shown in Fig. l, the tank being illustrated in its collapsed condition with the inner sections thereof telescoped within the outer section and certain parts thereof broken away and in section to reveal details;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary, enlarged cross sectional detailed View of a portion of the tank shownin Fig. l and illustrating more clearly the construction of overlapped, adjacent ends of a pair of the sections `of the tank;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary, enlarged cross sectional view ice` faken on une v-J-v of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of a modied form of the instant invention showing a pair of collapsible, portable tanks;

Fig. 7 is another modified form of the invention illustrating a second way in which structure forming a part of the invention may be utilized to extend the telescoped sections of a plurality of tanks;

Fig. 8 is a central, vertical cross sectional view of another modified form of the invention; and

Fig. 9 is a similar, vertical, central cross sectional view of still another form of tank embodying the concepts of the invention.

The preferred form of the invention which is shown in Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive, comprises a collapsible tank generally designated 10 and which includes a plurality of tubular, upright sections 12, 14 and 16 which are normally disposed in telescoped relationship as shown in Fig. 3, it being noted that section 14 may move into and out of section 16 while section 12 is reciprocable to and from a position within section 14. The extended positions of sections 12 and 14 are illustrated in Fig. 1, wherein it can be seen that the lowermost portion 18 of section 12 partially overlaps the uppermost portion 20 of section 14 and by the same token, the lowermost portion 22 of section 14 overlaps the upper end portion 24 of section 16.

The lowermost end of section 16 is closed by a circular bottom wall 26 and an annular channel member 28 is welded to the uppermost end of section 12 on the innermost face thereof. A plurality of radially extending spokes 30 are secured to a centnal hub 32 and to the innermost face of annular member 28. Secured to the lowermost part of hub 32 is a circular pressure plate 34 and a plurality of angularly disposed Ibracing members 36 are secured to the lowermost part of annular member 28 and extend radially toward the axis of section 12. An upright tubular sleeve 38 is secured to the innermost ends of members 36 and is located on the vertical axis of section 12.

Means for moving sections 14 and 12 into their extended positions, as illustrated in Fig. 1, comprises structure broadly designated by the numeral 40 which includes a plurality of elongated, tubular members 46, 48 and 50 disposed in telescoped relationship, it being noted that there is a tubular member for each of the sections 12, 14 and 16 respectively.

The uppermost end of tubular member 46 is secured to pressure plate 34 and the lowermost end of tubular member 50 rests on and is secured to bottom wall 26. A plurality of angularly disposed, radially extending brackets 52 are located within section 16 and extend from and are secured to bottom wall 26 and are welded to tubular member 50 so as to support the same on the vertical axis of section 16. An inlet conduit 54 passes through bottom wall 26 and communicates with tubular Vmember 50 and a check valve 56 is located in conduit 54 for controlling flow of iiuid therethrough. r[he inside vdiameter of tubular sleeve 38 is substantially equal to the outside diameter of tubular member 50 and, therefore, when sections 12 and 14 are telescoped within section 16, sleeve 38 operates to maintain section 12 in correct alignment with respect to section 14 during transportation of tank 10'.

Outwardly extending annular flanges 58 are secured to the lowermost portions 18 and 22 of sections 12 and 14 respectively, and inwardly extending iianges 60 are welded to the uppermost portions 20 and 24 of sections 14 and 16 respectively. As is clear from Fig. 4, anges 58 and 60 are substantially triangular in transverse cross section and the angular surface of flange 58 is configured so as to substantially conform with the corresponding surface of flange 60. A sealing ring 62 is provided on each of the flanges 58 and is preferably disposed in a circular groove 64 so that when the annular surfaces of iilanges 58 and 60 are brought into proximal relationship, sealing ring 62 is pressed therebetween.

Also, as is evident from Fig. 5, the lowermost ends of tubular members 46 and 48 respectively are provided with a pair of spaced, outwardly extending circumferential flanges 66 and 68 yand the uppermost ends of tubular members 48 and 50 are provided with inwardly extending, circumferential anges 70. Each of the lower ends of tubular members 46 and 48 is provided with .sealing means between iianges 66 and 68 thereof which preferably comprises ya series of spaced, circular sealing rings 72 which are disposed in circumferential grooves 74 formed in tubular members 46 and 48 respectively. The rings 72 are of sufficient cross sectional area to engage the innermost face of a corresponding tubular member 4S and 50 and thus preclude leakage of fluid from within structure 40.

As heretofore noted, tank 10 is particularly `adapted to be disposed upon tractor trailers or similar type vehicles and inasmuch as it is usually ldesirable to permanently mount tank 10 upon the bed of the vehicle, an opening is provided in the bed of the truck (not shown) so that conduit 54 may pass therethrough and thereby allow wall 26 to lie fiat on the truck bed.

Tank 10 is normally transported in the collapsed condition illustrated in Fig. 3 and after the vehicle has reached the well site and it is desired to move sections 12 and 14 into their extended positions as shown in Fig. l, fluid under pressure, either air or water, is directed into structure 40 after check valve 56 has been opened. As pressure builds up within structure 40 and against pressure plate 34, tubular member 46 initially moves upwardly within tubular member 48 until flange 58 on section 12 and flange 66 on tubular member 46 engage the ange 60 and the flange 70 on section 12 and tubular member 48 respectively. When this occurs, continued upward movement of sections 46 and 48 causes section 14 to move upwardly from within section 16 until the flange 58 on section 14 and the ange 66 on tubular member 48 engage iiange 60 and flange 70 on section 16 and tubular member 50 respectively. When sections 12 and 14 have been moved into their extended positions illustrated in Fig. l, check valve 56 is closed and the pressure maintained within structure 40 operates to retain sections 12 and 14 in their extended positions. The use of pressurized fluid to move sections 12 and 14 is particularly convenient because well cleaning contractors have available a large amount of equipment for directing fluids under pressure to desired locations and it is only necessary for such operators to connect their compressing or pumping equipment to conduit S4 and thus quickly move sections 12 and 14 to the position shown in Fig. 1. Also, sections 12 and 14 may be quickly collapsed into the telescoped position shown in Fig. 3 by merely opening check valve 56 and allowing the fluid therein to flow through conduit 54 to a point of outlet. The weight of sections 12 and 14 is sucient to push the fluid out of stnucture 40 and the sections 12 and 14 automatically telescope.

Although portable tank 10 has been illustrated and described as being open at the top thereof, it can be appreciated that the uppermost end of section 12 may be closed by any suitable means and that inlet and outlet openings be provided in the top thereof. In lieu there.- of, conduit means may also be connected to section 16 adjacent the lowermost part thereof so that uid material may be directed into and removed from tank 10.

A modified form of the invention is illustrated in Fig. 6 wherein it can be seen that there is provided a pair of portable, collapsible tanks 110, each of which includes a plurality of upright, tubular sections 112, 114 and 116 disposed in telescoped relationship, it being noted that each of tanks is provided with interengageable flange means at those portions normally disposed in partially overlapped relationship when sections 112 and 1 14 have been moved to their extended positions. Tanks 110 are also provided with a bottom wall (not shown) and a circular top Wall 176 at the uppermost end of section 112. Means for moving sections 112 and 114 into their extended positions includes a pair of spaced structures 140 which are located between tanks 110 externally thereof. Each of the structures 140 includes a plurality of tubular members 146, 148 and 150 which are disposed in telescoped relationship and which are essentially of the same i lconstruction as tubular members 46, 48 and 50 of tank 10.

A pair of parallel, elongated tie bars 178 are secured to the top walls 176 of each of tanks 110 and also to the uppermost end of a corresponding tubular member 146. Fluid supply conduits (not shown) are connected to each of the structures 140 respectively and when fluid under pressure is directed into the structures 140, tubular members 146 and 148 of each of structures 140 is moved into its extended position and which in turn moves sections 112 and 114 into extended positions similar to the positions of sections 12 and 14 of tank 10. A check valve is also provided in the supply conduits connected to structures 140 to thereby control the flow of uid thereinto. Operation of structures 140 is similar to the operation of structure 40 of tank`10.

Another modiiied form of the invention which utilizes iluid pressure to extend the sections of the portable tanks is illustrated in Fig. 7, wherein three collapsible tanks 210 are disposed in spaced, linear alignment and each of the tanks 210 includes a plurality of upright, tubular sections 212, 214 and 216 disposed in telescoped relationship in the same manner as the sections 12, 14 and 16 of tank 10. Interengageable ange means is also provided on the adjacent ends of sections 212, 214 and 216 which are partially overlapped when sections 212, 214 and 216 are moved into their extended positions and sealing means is provided between the flanges for preventing loss of fluid from each of tanks 210.

Apparatus for moving the sections 212 and 214 of each of the tanks 210 into their extended positions preferably comprises four spaced structures 240 which are similar in construction to the structures 40 of tank 10. 'I'.he uppermost end of each of the sections 212 is closed by a top wall 276 and secured to the top walls 276 is a substantially rectangular frame designated generally by the numeral 280 which includes a pair of spaced, elongated, parallel rods 282 extending linearly with the line of tanks 210 and spaced therefrom. A plurality of cross bars 284 interconnect rods 282 and as clearly apparent in Fig. 7, there is a cross bar 284 for each of the tanks 210 and a corresponding cross bar 284 is secured to the top wall 276 of each of the tanks 210. Structures 240 are disposed at the corners of the rectangle formedvby rods 282 and the end cross bars 284 and the uppermost end of each of the innermost telescoped, extensible members of the structures 240 are secured to frame 280 so that when iluid under pressure is directed to the structures 240 hom conduit means (not shown) and the extensible members of the structures 240 are moved into their extended positions, the sections 212 and 214 of each of the tanks 210 are moved into their extended positions in the manner previously described with respect to tank 10. Check valve means (not shown) is also provided in the conduit leading to structures 240 to control flow of fluid into and out of the structures 240, thereby permitting controlled extension of sections 212 and 214.

A fourth modied form of the invention is illustrated in Fig. 8 of the drawings, wherein a collapsible, portable tank designated generally by the numeral 310, includes a plurality of upright, tubular sections 312, 314 and 316 disposed in telescoped relationship, section 312 being movable to and from a position within section 314 and section 314 being reciprocable to and from a location within section 316.

The lowermost end of section 316 is preferably closed with a circular bottom wall 326 but the uppermost end of section 312 is preferably left open to allow escape of air as liquid is directed into tank 310. The lowermost portions 318 and 322 of sections 312 and 314 respectively are provided with relatively narrow, outwardly extending annular flanges 358 and, by the same token, the uppermost portions 320 and 324 of sections 314 and 316 are likewise provided with relatively narrow, inwardly extending annular anges 360 disposed in a position to interengage with a corresponding ange 358 when sections 312 and 314 are moved into their extended positions as illustrated in Fig. 8. Circular sealing rings 362 are disposed on each of the flanges 358 in a position to be pressed between corresponding flanges 358 and 360 when the flanges are moved into proximal relationship -to thereby preclude loss of liquid between adjacent ends of the sections 312, 314 and 316.

A oat 386 is mounted on the lowermost portion 318 of section 312 and a somewhat larger oat 388 is mounted on the lowermost portion 322 of section 314. A liquid conduit 354 is connected to section 316 and communicates with the interior thereof adjacent bottom wall 326 so that liquids under pressure may be directed into section 316. Assuming that sections 312 and 314 are disposed in telescoped relationship within section 316 and it is desired to move sections 312 and 314 -into their extended positions as illustrated in Fig. 8, liquid under pressure is directed into section 316 and when the level of such liquid rises within section 316 to a level where the buoyancy of oat 388 tends to move section 314 upwardly, it can be seen that both sections 312 and 314 are initially moved upwardly under the influence of iloat 388. During the time that section 314 is being moved upwardly by float 388, section 312 is also lifted by sect-ion 314 because of the outwardly extending flange 390 engaging the flange 360 of section 314. When the ilange 358 on section 314 engages the ange 360 on section 316, continued introduction of liquid into tank 310 causes section 312 to be moved upwardly under the influence of oat 386. It can now be ascertained that the sections 312 and 314 are maintained in their extended positions by the buoyancy of lloats 386 and 388 and because of the addedweight which must be supported by float 388, this oat must be considerably larger than oat 386. It can also be appreciated that as the level of liquid falls in tank 310, the sections 312 and 314 will successively move downwardly into telescoped relationship proportional to the`level of liquid within tank 310. Sealing rings 362 between each of the flanges 358 and 360 precludes lloss of uid from sections 312 and 314 and the seal will be maintained until the level of liquid falls to a position below the uppermost edge of a respective section 314 or 316. In this respect, it is to be noted that the floats 386 and 388 must be of sucient volume so that sections 312 and 314 are maintained in their fully extended positions by the buoyancy of oats 386 and 388 so that sections 312 and 314 respectively will not move downwardly into the section therebelow until the level of liquid has fallen below the uppermost edge of the section located therebelow.

A fth modication of the instant invention comprises a tank designated generally 410 and which is illustrated in Fig. 9 of the drawings. Tank 410 includes a plurality of upright, tubular sections 412, 414 and 416 disposed in telescoped relationship, section 412 being reciprocablc to and from a position within section 414 and section 414 likewise being movable to and from a location within section 416. The lowermost end of section 416 is preferably closed by a circular bottom wall 426 while the uppermost end of section 412 may be closed with a circular top wall 476. The lowermost portions 418 and 422 of sections 412 and 414 respectively are provided with relatively narrow, outwardly extending annular anges 458 and the uppermost portions 42|!) and 424 of sections 414 and 416 are similarly provided with narrow, inwardly extending annular flanges 460 which are adapted to interengage with flanges 458. Disposed on each of the flanges 458 is a circular sealing ring 462 which is in a position to be pressed between corresponding anges 458 and 460 when section s412 and .,414 have been moved into their extended positions as shown in Fig. 9.

Located within collapsible tank 410 is an elongated, tubular `liner 492 which is formed of substantially imperforate, llexible material such as polymerized synthetic resin and the lowermost end of liner 492 is closed with a bottom 494. As is apparent in Fig. 9, liner 492 is of suiiicient length to extend from bottom Wall 426 upwardly into section 412 when sections 412 and 414 are located in their fully extended positions. The upper marginal edge 496 of liner 492 is secured to the innermost face of section 412 around the entire circumference thereof adjacent portion 418 and substantially the entire area of the lowermost face of bottom 492 is secured to the uppermost face of bottom wall 426 by suitable means such as an adhesive. Also, that part 498 of liner 492 which is normally adjacent portion 422 of section 4141, is joined to the innermost surface of section 414 around the entire circumference thereof.

A fluid supply conduit 454 passes through bottom wall 426 and bottom 494 and communicates with the interior of liner 492. As hereinabove noted, if it is desired to mount tank 410 on a truck bed or the like, an opening may be provided in the truck bed to accommodate conduit 454.

Therefore, when sections 412 and 414 are disposed in telescoped relationship within section 416 and it is desired to direct uid under pressure into tank 410 to store the uid, and the capacity of fluid to be stored is greater than the volume of section 416 so that sections 412 and 414 must be moved into their extended positions as illustrated in Fig. 9, suicient pressure is placed on the fluid being introduced into tankv410 so that the pressure on top wall 476 initially moves section 412 into its extended position and then section 414. Successive extension of sections 412 and 414 is accomplished in the same manner as described with respect to tank but it is again pointed out that section 412 initially moves upwardly within section 414 until flange 458 on portion 418 engages flange 460 on portion 420 whereby upon continued upward movement of section 412, section 414 is moved upwardly until ange 458 on portion 422 engages ange 460 on portion 424.

A check valve (not shown) may also be provided in conduit 454 to control flow of uid into and out of tank 410. It is apparent that as fluid is allowed to leave tank 410, the sections 412 and 414 will successively telescope into the sections 414 and 416 respectively.

Because of the exible, imperforate nature of liner 466, `lluid is retained within the liner and section 412 and thus leakage of iluid from tank 410 is substantially precluded, but as an added safety measure, it is usually desirable to provide sealing rings 462 between corresponding flanges 458 ,and 460, sealing rings 462 also operating to cushion the engagement of flanges 458 with flanges 460.

Tank 410 is especially advantageous when it is desired to store either gaseous fluids under pressure or a combination of gaseous iluids and liquids, and also, where chemicals which react with metal are to be employed. In this respect, it may be pointed out that a exible liner 492 may be provided in tank 410 which covers all of the normally exposed innermost surfaces of tank 410 and thereby preclude any corrosion of the metal used in constructing tank 410.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. In portable receptacle construction, a plurality of upright, tubular sections normally disposed in telescoped relationship, the lower end of the outermost section and the upper end of the innermost section being closed, and the remaining sections and said innermost section being movable to and from extended positions with proximal adjacent ends of the sections disposed in partial overlapping relationship, there being interengageable means on said adjacent ends of the sections for limiting the extent of movement of said remaining sections and the innermost section with respect to each other as the same are moved to their extended position to thereby present a collapsible elongated tank; a ilexible, elongated, tubular liner disposed within said sections, the normally uppermost end of the liner being secured to said innermost section and Vthe lowerrnost end of the liner being closed and secured to the outermost section; and means communicating with said liner for directing fluid under pressure thereinto whereby the sections are successively moved into their extended positions as the tank is lled.

2. Receptacle construction as set forth in claim 1, wherein the transverse cross sectional diameter of the liner is approximately equal to the inside diameter of said innermost section.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,296,742 Bevington Mar. 11, 1919 2,367,497 Gruening Ian. 16, 1945 2,803,224 Wilson Aug. 20, 1957

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Classifications
U.S. Classification220/8
International ClassificationF17B1/00, B65D8/14, B65D8/04, F17B1/007
Cooperative ClassificationF17B1/007, F17B1/00
European ClassificationF17B1/00, F17B1/007